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(CBS Chicago)   Have you ever heard of the "Viper Team"? Well you shouldn't have. They are elite and top secret. Here is exclusive video of them in action though   (chicago.cbslocal.com) divider line 136
    More: Obvious, Metra, nuclear and radiation accidents, nuclear tests, swarms  
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13680 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Mar 2013 at 9:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-17 12:39:54 PM  
This is a fluff piece about how sensitive ad far reaching our nuclear dection is.

It's like people who put the ADT sign in their front yard hoping that will scare criminals away
 
2013-03-17 12:46:39 PM  

Ravijn: Nefarious: Are they coming to vipe the vindows?

[i.imgur.com image 460x310]


I came for that reference.

/knowing is half the battle
 
2013-03-17 12:53:33 PM  

RacySmurff: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

No, they're named after:

Sea
[travelinginmyworld.files.wordpress.com image 594x250]

Air
[morganbeebe.files.wordpress.com image 300x213]

Land
[entropy2.com image 300x187]


S A L ?
 
2013-03-17 01:22:06 PM  
img51.imageshack.us
 
2013-03-17 01:23:45 PM  
Have we reached the point where all commenters are indistinguishable nutters and trolls?
 
m00
2013-03-17 02:05:37 PM  
I'm surprised he wasn't shot 48 times, and that we're not reading about how heroic TSA agents stopped a nuclear bomb threat.
 
2013-03-17 02:21:11 PM  

ourbigdumbmouth: This is a fluff piece about how sensitive ad far reaching our nuclear dection is.

It's like people who put the ADT sign in their front yard hoping that will scare criminals away


I know someone who set off the radiation alarms crossing the border from America's hat/the 51st state after recently having radiation treatments for cancer.

Of course, I bet the border patrol turned down the sensitivity on those things after a ton of false positives. Wouldn't want radiation alarms interfering with their day.
 
2013-03-17 03:07:59 PM  

RacySmurff: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

No, they're named after:

Sea
[travelinginmyworld.files.wordpress.com image 594x250]

Air
[morganbeebe.files.wordpress.com image 300x213]

Land
[entropy2.com image 300x187]


Umm... I bet you were posting that hoping to appear smart.
 
2013-03-17 03:45:50 PM  

Slartibartfaster: Ive had these tests done, twice.
I travelled 3 days later through Canada, US and China.

Carried the cards (I got one when I went for the morning the other when I went for the follow up that night)

Nobody detected SQUAT


The detectors are scattered and only in a few places. More in the DC area, less in Detroit. It's sort of like biohazard detectors, there are a pile of them in the Capitol area but not in the burbs.
 
2013-03-17 03:46:42 PM  

rohar: noitsnot: Tell us what that is

That's the PITA of transmitting moderate frequencies through changing atmospheric conditions.  Assuming you're in the MF/HF band, atmospheric inputs can dramatically affect where and how you can transmit.  If conditions are one way, you can transmit/receive over a very short area, line of sight at max.  If conditions are just right, you can send MF all the way around the world.

This is where a pile of math comes in.  Attenuation, absorption, deflection and diffraction must all be accounted for and transmission must be adjusted accordingly.


NOBODY does propagation forecasts in their head.  You need current information from ionospheric sounding stations , which is then crunched by supercomputers to give daily or weekly predictions called ionograms.  Propagation can be estimated by knowing generally how the ionosphere behaves during different times of the day and the year, but nobody (except communications engineers designing point-to-point HF links) does calculations in their head, or by hand, except perhaps once in school to help them understand the math.  And with ALE, I'm not even sure anyone even looks at the ionograms any more...the computer does it all. And then, of course, there are the satellite links... HF comms are rapidly becoming a thing of the past.
 
2013-03-17 03:47:44 PM  

ModernLuddite: What if a ton of people all bought some uranium and carried around major cities in their pockets? For the lulz?


It's generally not radioactive enough to detect. A truckload of bananas, on the other hand, is a moving target.
 
2013-03-17 04:17:05 PM  
rohar:
At the end of the day though, when they leave the teams they don't generally amount to much.  See all the news stories about the guys that went to get Bin Laden after they separated.  It's ugly.

Well, there's a lot going on there. For one thing, (and pardon me if I get the Navy part a bit off, was Army) the DA missions like this one attract the more wildassed. If it were SF, what you'd see is the guys that are rabid for DA have gravitated to ODAs that specialize in that, and those guys are generally (coff) very Bravo-ish. And I'd bet that the OBL teams were all whatever SEAL specialty correlates to Bravos, with a few exceptions you probably didn't read about in the news.

Those guys, in my experience, end up leaving the service and becoming cops, security guards or they run the shipping and delivery department, because weapon specialists are not in high demand in civilian life. We had a SEAL in sales at one point. Nice guy, picked on him all the time.

OTOH, if you go to SAIC, Titan, L3 or whatnot, you'll see a big contingent of Charlies and Echoes working as design and development engineers. Because engineering and electronics are a better basis than a Bravo for getting a civilian job.

SOCOM operators tend to have a longer reintegration period, too, there's a sort of short woohoo period up front followed by a long period of what's sort of like separation anxiety, you've been with the same guys more or less in a very close environment for years and then bammo into civvies you go, it can be a bit depressing for a while, almost a grieving process - you aren't one of the guys anymore, you'll likely never see them again, and your hometown is changed, family scattered, there you are. So after they ETS you get sort of a sag where nothing seems to move for a while, and maybe that's why it sounds so ugly in the news, they'd all have to be in that phase.
 
2013-03-17 04:17:42 PM  

UnspokenVoice: RacySmurff: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

No, they're named after:

Sea
[travelinginmyworld.files.wordpress.com image 594x250]

Air
[morganbeebe.files.wordpress.com image 300x213]

Land
[entropy2.com image 300x187]

Umm... I bet you were posting that hoping to appear smart.


Was posting that to appear to be a smartASS. Didn't I get it right?
 
2013-03-17 04:23:03 PM  
Girion47:
Apparently because of protocol they had to strip search the kid and turn him over to the NSA, the guy told me that the kid actually got sent to prison over the whole incident and the tours were no longer offered.

The NSA doesn't do that sort of thing - they specialize in crypto and SIGINT. They do own the Ft Meade police force, but that's it.

If you did something like this on a sub, they'd turn you over to the boat's master-at-arms, then the MPs then ONI would have at you, turn you over to the FBI later.
 
2013-03-17 04:30:03 PM  
Have you ever heard of the

Americans
Secretly
Serving
Higher
Order &
Law
Enforcement
Services?

obscure FFB reference, nyet?
 
2013-03-17 04:40:12 PM  
How the frak has this thread gone on so long without a BSG image??????img508.imageshack.us
 
2013-03-17 04:44:44 PM  

ka1axy: rohar: noitsnot: Tell us what that is

That's the PITA of transmitting moderate frequencies through changing atmospheric conditions.  Assuming you're in the MF/HF band, atmospheric inputs can dramatically affect where and how you can transmit.  If conditions are one way, you can transmit/receive over a very short area, line of sight at max.  If conditions are just right, you can send MF all the way around the world.

This is where a pile of math comes in.  Attenuation, absorption, deflection and diffraction must all be accounted for and transmission must be adjusted accordingly.

NOBODY does propagation forecasts in their head.  You need current information from ionospheric sounding stations , which is then crunched by supercomputers to give daily or weekly predictions called ionograms.  Propagation can be estimated by knowing generally how the ionosphere behaves during different times of the day and the year, but nobody (except communications engineers designing point-to-point HF links) does calculations in their head, or by hand, except perhaps once in school to help them understand the math.  And with ALE, I'm not even sure anyone even looks at the ionograms any more...the computer does it all. And then, of course, there are the satellite links... HF comms are rapidly becoming a thing of the past.


I'm guessing in the modern world you're right.  Sad state of affairs this has become.  My MF/HF was designed about WWII and we had to do things by hand.  I probably wouldn't know how to navigate a modern radio room.  If in doubt, fire up the sat stack and all.

I'd bet good money the poor suckers that work that equipment know how to tear it down to the last transistor and rebuild it blindfolded though.  Meanwhile, the lower rates make their way into SEAL teams, and can't calculate when their next meal is going to occur.

This is not a success of intelligence, rather a success of groupthink well directed.
 
2013-03-17 05:24:24 PM  

rohar: Girion47: rohar: Girion47: rohar: Girion47: One of them had been on a sub for the Navy, he had all kinds of crazy ass stories about what happened on his boat.

As a former bubblehead, I'm acutely curious of these stories, please elaborate so as that we may judge his authenticity.

One of the many I can remember:

Sub was docked at one of those places in Southern VA.  This sub had been opened for public tours, the crew had marked the floors to show where the tourists could step, and where they couldn't(yellow zone would get you ejected, red being immediate arrest).   Apparently a high school group came through, and one kid being a smartass walked into a "red" zone and tried to push a button.   Apparently because of protocol they had to strip search the kid and turn him over to the NSA, the guy told me that the kid actually got sent to prison over the whole incident and the tours were no longer offered.

Also told me that everyone was assigned some kind of melee weapon and post in case of a boarding party.

I can't remember any of the other stories he told, I was more interested in hearing one of the guys detail how to sneak a "device" onto a plane that the TSA wouldn't be able to catch.

So a liar then?

quite possible.

Made the trip entertaining at least.

No doubt.

Turns out, after many tours of my boat, I've been through this process a few times.  We don't paint the decks ever.  If we did, we'd have to clean the paint up.  Sailors aren't in to creating more work for themselves.  We'd run tape on the decks in some places (red tape, to say "don't go beyond here") for certain sensitive areas.  We'd post a shipmate at these spots to remind those touring that you can't go here.  All sensitive gear is covered by large blankets like moving blankets and held on by cams so nobody can push any serious buttons, they can't even see them.

If someone on a tour got into trouble, we'd never respond with criminal action.  If this occurred, it was a failure of the crew, not the ...


Dude was old, I'd guess he was active duty in the 70's.

Again, I'm sure he was exaggerating like a lot of old men like to do, I let him go on and on because I was driving through central florida and had nothing better to do.   Plus I find it useful to keep my client's happy when I'm working with them.
 
2013-03-17 05:30:10 PM  

Girion47: Dude was old, I'd guess he was active duty in the 70's.


There were a lot of drugs in the sub fleet in the '70s.

Curious, did he start his yarn with "True story" or "No shiat"?
 
2013-03-17 05:31:45 PM  

rohar: Girion47: Dude was old, I'd guess he was active duty in the 70's.

There were a lot of drugs in the sub fleet in the '70s.

Curious, did he start his yarn with "True story" or "No shiat"?


No he started with the kind of prologue you get from those that don't normally get listened to.

You know "this is secret..., you can't tell anyone...  this is super serious..."   shiat like that.  They build it up a lot and then exaggerate everything.
 
2013-03-17 06:14:19 PM  

Girion47: rohar: Girion47: Dude was old, I'd guess he was active duty in the 70's.

There were a lot of drugs in the sub fleet in the '70s.

Curious, did he start his yarn with "True story" or "No shiat"?

No he started with the kind of prologue you get from those that don't normally get listened to.

You know "this is secret..., you can't tell anyone...  this is super serious..."   shiat like that.  They build it up a lot and then exaggerate everything.


For the uninitiated, if an old salt starts a story with "true story", it's a lie.  If they start with "no shiat" it's probably true.  There are rules.
 
2013-03-17 06:37:44 PM  
rohar:
For the uninitiated, if an old salt starts a story with "true story", it's a lie.  If they start with "no shiat" it's probably true.  There are rules.

Army stories always start with 'This ain't no shiat'. It's the Army equivalent of 'once upon a time'.
 
2013-03-17 07:04:35 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Close2TheEdge: TSA?

VIPR - Violently Ignoring People's Rights?

Visible Islamist Profiling Racists


Since Islam isn't a race, how can profiling them be racist?
 
2013-03-17 07:24:28 PM  

RacySmurff: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

No, they're named after:

Sea
[travelinginmyworld.files.wordpress.com image 594x250]

Air
[morganbeebe.files.wordpress.com image 300x213]

Land
[entropy2.com image 300x187]


Sals? Sure, Sal "No-nose" Toretti was a heavy hitter but a trained killer of babies? It just ain't so.
 
2013-03-17 09:04:24 PM  

Girion47: I once did a baseline safety analysis of a Viper team in a fairly large city down in Florida.   Got to ride around with the guys, see where they set up, and what kind of unique dangers they were exposed to when doing their job.

One of them had been on a sub for the Navy, he had all kinds of crazy ass stories about what happened on his boat.


Good farking god, this is the most blatant mall ninja post I have ever seen on Fark.
 
2013-03-17 09:19:56 PM  

Robyr: Girion47: I once did a baseline safety analysis of a Viper team in a fairly large city down in Florida.   Got to ride around with the guys, see where they set up, and what kind of unique dangers they were exposed to when doing their job.

One of them had been on a sub for the Navy, he had all kinds of crazy ass stories about what happened on his boat.

Good farking god, this is the most blatant mall ninja post I have ever seen on Fark.


How so?
 
2013-03-17 10:46:06 PM  

BgJonson79: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Close2TheEdge: TSA?

VIPR - Violently Ignoring People's Rights?

Visible Islamist Profiling Racists

Since Islam isn't a race, how can profiling them be racist?


They needed a vowel, dammit. One of the Congressman who sponsered their appropration bill comes from a big vowel industry district.
 
2013-03-17 11:37:37 PM  
static.tvtropes.org
 
2013-03-18 02:32:29 AM  

RacySmurff: UnspokenVoice: RacySmurff: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

No, they're named after:

Sea
[travelinginmyworld.files.wordpress.com image 594x250]

Air
[morganbeebe.files.wordpress.com image 300x213]

Land
[entropy2.com image 300x187]

Umm... I bet you were posting that hoping to appear smart.

Was posting that to appear to be a smartASS. Didn't I get it right?


LOL It's your story. So I guess you got it right.
 
2013-03-18 10:32:07 AM  

Snarfangel: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: edmo: First time I ever saw "elite" and TSA in the same sentence.

Composed exclusively of TSA employees who have graduated High School. Sort of reminds me of those Barry Sadler lyrics: "One hundred men will test today, but only three win the green beret...."

Keeping scissors from the sky
Pawing girls who want to die
Shoes will kill you all one day
The brave men of the TSA.


Oh damn, that's good. Seriously! You should try to do a TSA-related parody for the entire song - then find someone to produce it. I can see some overly-uniformed TSA goof with bright blue gloves, in place of Sadler. Outstanding guerrilla theater.

The best form of political criticism is ridicule.

'Course you would never be able to fly again........
 
2013-03-18 10:44:21 AM  

rohar: RacySmurff: rohar: Tobin_Lam: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

Seals are badass. I bet you would lose a fight with one in hand to hand combat.

Yeah, but if you turn the tables the difference in abilities is just as apparent.  Ask a SEAL to solve a polynomial equation sometime and see what happens.

Pretty sure SEALs aren't meatheads. If you're an idiot: you don't make the cut.

Some are, some aren't.  Like the rest of the Navy, they go through their individual rate training first.  There's no strikers in SEAL teams.  The guys from the technical rates are pretty bright, those from the non technical rates not so much.  A machinist is a machinist, not a high bar to cross.  Radiomen, by contrast, have to be pretty bright.  Doing wave table propagation in your head is a bit of a trick.  The washout rate in the technical A schools is pretty huge.

At the end of the day though, when they leave the teams they don't generally amount to much.  See all the news stories about the guys that went to get Bin Laden after they separated.  It's ugly.


Too bad you have absolutely no idea what you're talking about.
 
2013-03-18 02:36:50 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]


I prefer to think of them as named after these:

www.maniacworld.com

Quite nasty.
 
2013-03-18 02:42:28 PM  

ka1axy: rohar: noitsnot: Tell us what that is

That's the PITA of transmitting moderate frequencies through changing atmospheric conditions.  Assuming you're in the MF/HF band, atmospheric inputs can dramatically affect where and how you can transmit.  If conditions are one way, you can transmit/receive over a very short area, line of sight at max.  If conditions are just right, you can send MF all the way around the world.

This is where a pile of math comes in.  Attenuation, absorption, deflection and diffraction must all be accounted for and transmission must be adjusted accordingly.

NOBODY does propagation forecasts in their head.  You need current information from ionospheric sounding stations , which is then crunched by supercomputers to give daily or weekly predictions called ionograms.  Propagation can be estimated by knowing generally how the ionosphere behaves during different times of the day and the year, but nobody (except communications engineers designing point-to-point HF links) does calculations in their head, or by hand, except perhaps once in school to help them understand the math.  And with ALE, I'm not even sure anyone even looks at the ionograms any more...the computer does it all. And then, of course, there are the satellite links... HF comms are rapidly becoming a thing of the past.


I do it in my head.

/Old school.
 
2013-03-18 05:53:56 PM  

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: You should try to do a TSA-related parody for the entire song - then find someone to produce it.


TSA gangstaz (NSFW)
 
2013-03-19 03:45:39 PM  

rohar: Tobin_Lam: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

Seals are badass. I bet you would lose a fight with one in hand to hand combat.

Yeah, but if you turn the tables the difference in abilities is just as apparent.  Ask a SEAL to solve a polynomial equation sometime and see what happens.


Ask a TSA member to IDENTIFY a polynomial equation.
 
2013-03-19 04:38:04 PM  

MikeBoomshadow: rohar: Tobin_Lam: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: The more hyperbolic the name of the government project (VIPR team, USA PATRIOT Act), the worse it is. FFS, our most badass special forces teams are named after this:
[ec.europa.eu image 450x297]

Seals are badass. I bet you would lose a fight with one in hand to hand combat.

Yeah, but if you turn the tables the difference in abilities is just as apparent.  Ask a SEAL to solve a polynomial equation sometime and see what happens.

Ask a TSA member to IDENTIFY a polynomial equation.


Ask and yee shall receive:
lawprofessors.typepad.com

/sorta :P
 
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