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(Slate)   The true story of Saint Patrick, the man who drove the most terrifying creatures known to man out of Ireland   (slate.com ) divider line
    More: Hero, Saint Patrick, Ireland, David Plotz, Irish immigrants, Trinity, Christianization, evangelical protestant, Irish people  
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10268 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Mar 2013 at 3:54 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



79 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-03-16 10:36:56 PM  
The British?
 
2013-03-16 10:40:26 PM  
According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.
 
2013-03-16 10:42:09 PM  
Teetotalers?
 
2013-03-16 10:43:38 PM  

Lionel Mandrake: The British?




He was British, born in Wales, so that would be no...
 
2013-03-16 10:59:39 PM  

GAT_00: According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.


But those dang muslins just ran around killing everybody, don't you know? It was the monks who invented Algebra and introduced the concept of zero to europe, not those heathen savages who took over the holy land.
 
2013-03-16 11:00:06 PM  
Republicans and clowns?
 
2013-03-16 11:02:12 PM  
Hipsters?
 
2013-03-16 11:06:58 PM  
Juggalos?
 
2013-03-16 11:07:14 PM  
i759.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-16 11:16:24 PM  
Furries?
 
2013-03-16 11:21:02 PM  

rynthetyn: GAT_00: According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.

But those dang muslins just ran around killing everybody, don't you know? It was the monks who invented Algebra and introduced the concept of zero to europe, not those heathen savages who took over the holy land.


I suppose I can understand, but I still think it's hilarious that the concept of zero scared the fark out of people and all knowledge of it was suppressed for years.
 
2013-03-16 11:27:57 PM  
ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-16 11:33:01 PM  

GAT_00: I suppose I can understand, but I still think it's hilarious that the concept of zero scared the fark out of people and all knowledge of it was suppressed for years.


i911.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-16 11:49:12 PM  
I think most people would rather hear a fabricated story about how he became the patron saint of amateur alcoholics.
 
2013-03-16 11:56:54 PM  

basemetal: I think most people would rather hear a fabricated story about how he became the patron saint of amateur alcoholics.


As opposed to professional alcoholics?
 
2013-03-16 11:59:02 PM  

Snarfangel: [ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com image 813x606]

gallery1.anivide.com

 
2013-03-17 12:05:42 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: basemetal: I think most people would rather hear a fabricated story about how he became the patron saint of amateur alcoholics.

As opposed to professional alcoholics?


I can vouch for the professionals. We have a union.
 
2013-03-17 12:24:55 AM  
Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.


Protestants can be delusional.
 
2013-03-17 12:44:57 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Benevolent Misanthrope: basemetal: I think most people would rather hear a fabricated story about how he became the patron saint of amateur alcoholics.

As opposed to professional alcoholics?

I can vouch for the professionals. We have a union.


And St. Patrick's day is definitely for the amateurs.
 
2013-03-17 12:50:45 AM  
The Irish?
 
2013-03-17 01:11:23 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Benevolent Misanthrope: basemetal: I think most people would rather hear a fabricated story about how he became the patron saint of amateur alcoholics.

As opposed to professional alcoholics?

I can vouch for the professionals. We have a union.


but no meetings
 
2013-03-17 01:20:19 AM  

Lsherm: Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.

Protestants can be delusional.


You Catholics support a child molesting church and you call us delusional?
 
2013-03-17 01:20:29 AM  
Gypsy house painters?
 
2013-03-17 01:25:35 AM  
St. Urho would kick St. Patrick's Ass.
 
2013-03-17 01:51:49 AM  

ArkAngel: Lsherm: Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.

Protestants can be delusional.

You Catholics support a child molesting church and you call us delusional?


Only when it comes to St. Patrick.

As far as molestation, we're getting all the press, but you guys have a problem, too, and it's bigger in the US by number than Catholic molestations.  There just isn't any one central organization to blame, so it doesn't play as well in the news, and it's easier to miss because it spans different faiths.  So I guess maybe you're delusional in that respect, too, because you can just assume it's happening in some other faith instead of your own.

On the flipside, Protestant molestation is far more likely to occur from volunteers, likely because they don't have celibate priests.
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2013-03-17 02:08:25 AM  
Rather than defer to Slate, do your own research if you really want to know.

Concept obscure?

Welcome to Fark aside, I'm surprised to see a bunch of drunks turn a St. Patrick's Day thread into a troll-fest.
 
2013-03-17 03:08:04 AM  

FNG: Rather than defer to Slate, do your own research if you really want to know.

Concept obscure?

Welcome to Fark aside, I'm surprised to see a bunch of drunks turn a St. Patrick's Day thread into a troll-fest.


Anyone who has been here since 2002 is trolling when they say something like that.
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2013-03-17 03:19:42 AM  
I'm not trolling. I'm just saying don't rely on one article to be truth. It's not an easy task to figure out just what happened and when. But.

Everyone knows that St. Patrick brought animatronic snakes and faked the whole "chasing them out" thing. That much is obvious.

And I hope everyone has a safe and happy St. Patrick's Day :)
 
2013-03-17 03:23:09 AM  
Crusty jugglers?
 
2013-03-17 04:01:41 AM  

CavalierEternal: Crusty jugglers?


Not as bad as the terror of the town, The Living Statue!

thedroidyourelookingfor.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-17 04:02:34 AM  

GAT_00: According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.


Mostly This.

/This
 
2013-03-17 04:02:56 AM  

FNG: I spend most of my free time Farking, reading, watching sports, and spending time with my girlfriend


As Dick Nixon once said: "It's the lie that gets you."
 
2013-03-17 04:04:24 AM  

Lsherm: Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.

Protestants can be delusional.


Ian Paisley once claimed St. Patrick was a Protestant. Mind you, that's hardly the most delusional (or offensive) thing he's ever said.
 
2013-03-17 04:04:35 AM  

Snarfangel: [ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com image 813x606]


i don't know why, but i just had a small orgasm. i think it was the wrong kind. again.
 
2013-03-17 04:04:50 AM  
Considering the history of Christianity taking over countries and imposing their will upon people, I would have preferred that Ireland remained pagan.
 
2013-03-17 04:09:21 AM  

GAT_00:

According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.

Again with the reading comprehension problems?  Note: "allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages."  Arabic learning was new to Europe, albeit it included some Greek works.
 
2013-03-17 04:09:45 AM  

GAT_00: rynthetyn: GAT_00: According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.

But those dang muslins just ran around killing everybody, don't you know? It was the monks who invented Algebra and introduced the concept of zero to europe, not those heathen savages who took over the holy land.

I suppose I can understand, but I still think it's hilarious that the concept of zero scared the fark out of people and all knowledge of it was suppressed for years.


Geez, If Pythagorus could be scared of beans then I can understand why people would be scared of zero.
 
2013-03-17 04:14:46 AM  
Ireland once had feminists?
 
2013-03-17 04:16:10 AM  
Last night, Fox Family Channel aired its made-for-TV movie St. Patrick. Fox's Patrick is mostly drawn from the historical record, but the producers added one new storyline. The English parent church demands that Patrick collect its church taxes in Ireland. Patrick rebels and risks excommunication by the British bishop. The fearless colonist leads a tax revolt against the villainous English.

Oh for cryin' out loud.
 
2013-03-17 04:29:59 AM  
<i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.
 
2013-03-17 04:30:36 AM  

sendtodave: <i>


Dammitsomuch.
 
2013-03-17 04:31:57 AM  

GeneralJim: GAT_00: According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.
Again with the reading comprehension problems?  Note: "allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages."  Arabic learning was new to Europe, albeit it included some Greek works.


The Arabic world is what kept many of the ancient texts that allowed western learning to survive the dark ages. For someone who accuses others of having a reading comprehension problem, you have a hard time yourself. Not to mention a weak understanding of history. There was a lot of ancient knowledge that actually had to be retranslated from Arabic back into western languages because the only thing that survived the dark ages was the Arabic translations. Not to mention all of the ancient texts that the Arabs saved and hung on to, and the fact that Spain and all of the knowledge there was saved from falling into darkness by the Moorish occupation. Spain was the one light in a very dark Europe.
 
2013-03-17 04:36:17 AM  
Bono, and the rest of U2?
 
2013-03-17 04:40:26 AM  
When did he find the time for buggering the alter boys that he was so fond of?
 
2013-03-17 04:53:13 AM  
Dark Ages is a misnomer, sure things weren't as good as in the Roman days, well for those who had been under Roman rule, but it wasn't like all learning and advancement stopped. Far from it. Sure a lot old learning was lost, but that didn't mean learning just stopped.
 
2013-03-17 04:56:23 AM  

the801: Snarfangel: [ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com image 813x606]

i don't know why, but i just had a small orgasm. i think it was the wrong kind. again.


Annie Hall

sendtodave: <i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.


My Grandfather rode passenger in his mother's womb on a boat from Belfast. John Patrick liked to tip a bottle of whiskey and voice his opinion on the bead rattlers and their evil influences.
 
2013-03-17 04:56:24 AM  

sendtodave: <i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.


Nope. The Roman Empire fell for a lot of reasons but the Church isn't really one of them. The Byzantines held together really well and, at the time, were more resolutely Christian than the Western part of Europe. The Church really was the only organizing influence that spanned Europe at the time. They preserved more and advanced more knowledge than any secular source in the continent. Without the Church there wouldn't have even been the tradition of literacy that allowed them to study the works that Arab scholars preserved.
 
2013-03-17 04:59:29 AM  

sendtodave: <i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.


The Church didn't cause the Dark Ages (which is a term historians don't really like, anyway). Rome overstretched itself - the Western Empire, at least. In the east it survived in Byzantium until the fall of Constantinople in 1204.

Have a listen to Dan Carlin's Hardcore History episode, Thor's Angels. And even after the fall of Rome, it wasn't very long until they tried to get things going again under Charlemagne.
 
2013-03-17 04:59:58 AM  

Miss Stein: [i759.photobucket.com image 300x357]



That is awesome.
 
2013-03-17 05:03:54 AM  

ArkAngel: Lsherm: Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.

Protestants can be delusional.

You Catholics support a child molesting church and you call us delusional?


I talk to trees and I'm calling you both delusional.
 
2013-03-17 05:10:21 AM  

thisispete: And even after the fall of Rome, it wasn't very long until they tried to get things going again under Charlemagne.


By which I mean 3 centuries, but the ideal of Rome persisted until then.
 
2013-03-17 05:10:54 AM  

AbbeySomeone: the801: Snarfangel: [ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com image 813x606]

i don't know why, but i just had a small orgasm. i think it was the wrong kind. again.

Annie Hall


Manhattan.
 
2013-03-17 05:15:27 AM  

Duck_of_Doom: Last night, Fox Family Channel aired its made-for-TV movie St. Patrick. Fox's Patrick is mostly drawn from the historical record, but the producers added one new storyline. The English parent church demands that Patrick collect its church taxes in Ireland. Patrick rebels and risks excommunication by the British bishop. The fearless colonist leads a tax revolt against the villainous English.

Oh for cryin' out loud.


Area Man morans Passionate Defender Of What They Imagine St. Patrick's Day To Be
 
2013-03-17 05:18:16 AM  

Duck_of_Doom: Last night, Fox Family Channel aired its made-for-TV movie St. Patrick. Fox's Patrick is mostly drawn from the historical record, but the producers added one new storyline. The English parent church demands that Patrick collect its church taxes in Ireland. Patrick rebels and risks excommunication by the British bishop. The fearless colonist leads a tax revolt against the villainous English.

Oh for cryin' out loud.


Well, it could have happened!  We don't know much about Pat's life, officially.  ;-)
 
2013-03-17 05:19:59 AM  

Shadowtag: ArkAngel: Lsherm: Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.

Protestants can be delusional.

You Catholics support a child molesting church and you call us delusional?

I talk to trees and I'm calling you both delusional.


Then you might find this interesting
 
2013-03-17 05:22:10 AM  

i49.tinypic.com

 
2013-03-17 05:47:19 AM  

odinsposse: sendtodave: <i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.

Nope. The Roman Empire fell for a lot of reasons but the Church isn't really one of them. The Byzantines held together really well and, at the time, were more resolutely Christian than the Western part of Europe. The Church really was the only organizing influence that spanned Europe at the time. They preserved more and advanced more knowledge than any secular source in the continent. Without the Church there wouldn't have even been the tradition of literacy that allowed them to study the works that Arab scholars preserved.


Having read the book, its argument is that the irish were bent on copying not just church works (like most monks), but all sorts of secular philosophy. Rome wasn't particularly fond of that, but those irish monks were the ones who reintegrated those works into europe as the founded and spread monasteries on the mainland (basically, when one got too large, they sent senior monks out to start their own- which created a pretty decent distribution network). Arab scholars were indeed preserving the works, but they weren't exactly integrating them back into european society. Without the Irish monks, Plato would just be some archaic text buried somewhere, probably lost, not the founding canon of western civilization.
 
2013-03-17 06:05:20 AM  

rynthetyn:

The Arabic world is what kept many of the ancient texts that allowed western learning to survive the dark ages. For someone who accuses others of having a reading comprehension problem, you have a hard time yourself. Not to mention a weak understanding of history. There was a lot of ancient knowledge that actually had to be retranslated from Arabic back into western languages because the only thing that survived the dark ages was the Arabic translations. Not to mention all of the ancient texts that the Arabs saved and hung on to, and the fact that Spain and all of the knowledge there was saved from falling into darkness by the Moorish occupation. Spain was the one light in a very dark Europe.

So, you share his problem, eh?  Try again, bunky.  Of the knowledge was kept in Europe, most of it was kept by the Irish.  It's not really that hard.

With slow learners, sometimes an example from another field helps comprehension...  Let's see:

Person 1: "Hey, look here.  It says that all of the Checker Marathons, which used to be the only car used by the Checker Taxi Company, were manufactured in Kalamazoo, MI, by Checker Motors Corporation."

Person 2: "That's bullshiat.  I was in a cab in NYC last month, and it was a Chevy."

Person 1: "Well, then, it wasn't a Checker Marathon, was it?"

Does that make more sense that way?  Hopefully so.  With that in mind,  well then, that information that came from Arabia wasn't saved in Europe, was it?

 
2013-03-17 06:23:33 AM  

teto85: Snarfangel: [ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com image 813x606]


gallery1.anivide.com

okay...Does this help?

s22.postimage.org
 
2013-03-17 07:08:54 AM  
Hey Paddy boyo, you missed a couple.

thumbs.anyclip.com
 
2013-03-17 07:08:54 AM  
Of course, one hears a lot of apochryuphal tales, as a child. When I was a wee lad, in first grade, Sister Mary Rose explained it to me that St. Patrick had run all the snakes out of Ireland.
And then they swam across the Atlantic to New York, and Boston.
Where they joined the police force.
 
2013-03-17 07:20:01 AM  
Lawyers?

/I kid.  I'm a lawyer.

odinsposse: sendtodave: <i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.

Nope. The Roman Empire fell for a lot of reasons but the Church isn't really one of them. The Byzantines held together really well and, at the time, were more resolutely Christian than the Western part of Europe. The Church really was the only organizing influence that spanned Europe at the time. They preserved more and advanced more knowledge than any secular source in the continent. Without the Church there wouldn't have even been the tradition of literacy that allowed them to study the works that Arab scholars preserved.


QT.  Since Gibbon, the Church has unfairly got the blame but there were a lot of factors at work (e.g., the revolving-door leadership of the late Empire, the collapse of the economy and trade resulting from an unstable Roman government, climate change, etc.).  Some good recent reads on the subject are How Rome Fell and The Fall of Rome.
 
2013-03-17 08:06:48 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Considering the history of Christianity taking over countries and imposing their will upon people, I would have preferred that Ireland remained pagan.


only because it would have made cooler movies...
 
2013-03-17 08:08:48 AM  

AbbeySomeone: the801: Snarfangel: [ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com image 813x606]

i don't know why, but i just had a small orgasm. i think it was the wrong kind. again.

Annie Hall

sendtodave: <i>Cahill's book, which could just as well be titledHow St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled. </i>

I was told that the Church caused the Dark Ages.

My Grandfather rode passenger in his mother's womb on a boat from Belfast. John Patrick liked to tip a bottle of whiskey and voice his opinion on the bead rattlers and their evil influences.


is this what they mean by word salad?
 
2013-03-17 08:43:06 AM  
The scarcity of facts about St. Patrick's life has made him a dress-up doll: Anyone can create his own St. Patrick.

Oh look, Christian historians and apologists claim he "fixed" all of the world's problems caused entirely by the scourge of paganism, which just went disappeared passively and non-violently. *yawn*



/hey, what are all these Green Men doing in the eaves of Irish churches...?
 
2013-03-17 09:09:14 AM  

Lsherm: Ireland's Protestant minority, by contrast, denies that Patrick was a bishop or that he was sent by Rome. They depict him as anti-Roman Catholic and credit him with inventing a distinctly Celtic church, with its own homegrown symbols and practices. He is an Irish hero, not a Catholic one.

Outside Ireland, too, Patrick has been freely reinterpreted. Evangelical Protestants claim him as one of their own. After all, he read his Bible, and his faith came to him in visions.

Protestants can be delusional.


As an evangelical Protestant, this is news to me.
 
2013-03-17 09:57:20 AM  
chirho.me
 
2013-03-17 10:10:52 AM  
Why do Priest hate Pagan hippie chicks? Is it because the Pagan hippie chicks  run around nude and are very, very, very, very friendly...if you know what I mean.

/Only skimmed a few paragraphs
/There is a lot of speculation in History
 
2013-03-17 10:36:33 AM  
Democrats?
 
2013-03-17 11:32:39 AM  
The native people who didn't follow the exact same religion as St. Pattycakes?
 
2013-03-17 11:38:19 AM  
Gigantic spiders?
 
2013-03-17 01:11:39 PM  

cmunic8r99: Republicans and clowns?


Intolerant, ignorant, self-important dipshiats like cmunic8r99 who drag politics into everything with blanketing prejudice?
 
2013-03-17 01:17:20 PM  

Mael99: cmunic8r99: Republicans and clowns?

Intolerant, ignorant, self-important dipshiats like cmunic8r99 who drag politics into everything with blanketing prejudice?


Nope.
 
2013-03-17 01:54:39 PM  

MikeSass: Patrick was no more British than Columbus was Italian.  Yes, Wales is now part of England, but when Patrick was born it was actually part of Scotland.  He was therefore a Scot.  Same deal with Columbus.  He was born in Genoa, which is now part of Italy.  But at the time it was not.  It was independent, so much so that they had their own language.  Columbus didn't even speak Italian.




Wales isn't part of England. It's a separate country within the United Kingdom. If you come from Wales you're Welsh, not Scottish or English or anything else, no matter at what time you were born. Wales, Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland are all part of the British Isles. If you are Scottish you are also British. If you are English you are also British. If you are Welsh you are also British at the same time. You see how this works?
 
2013-03-17 03:46:57 PM  
Spiral Monkey
Wales, Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland are all part of the British Isles.

You don't refer to Irish people as British unless you want your ass kicked.
 
2013-03-17 06:03:55 PM  
but.... but...... but don;t they still have ex-wives??? Are they Really all gone???
 
2013-03-17 06:05:40 PM  

GAT_00: rynthetyn: GAT_00: According to Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, Paddy's influence extended far beyond his adopted land. Cahill's book, which could just as well be titled How St. Patrick Saved Civilization, contends that Patrick's conversion of Ireland allowed Western learning to survive the Dark Ages. Ireland pacified and churchified as the rest of Europe crumbled

This is ignoring the incredibly important role played by Arabic civilizations who were instrumental in returning educational texts back to Europe once the Dark Ages ended.

But those dang muslins just ran around killing everybody, don't you know? It was the monks who invented Algebra and introduced the concept of zero to europe, not those heathen savages who took over the holy land.

I suppose I can understand, but I still think it's hilarious that the concept of zero scared the fark out of people and all knowledge of it was suppressed for years.



Or naught.
 
2013-03-18 10:42:31 AM  

Spiralmonkey: MikeSass: Patrick was no more British than Columbus was Italian.  Yes, Wales is now part of England, but when Patrick was born it was actually part of Scotland.  He was therefore a Scot.  Same deal with Columbus.  He was born in Genoa, which is now part of Italy.  But at the time it was not.  It was independent, so much so that they had their own language.  Columbus didn't even speak Italian.

Wales isn't part of England. It's a separate country within the United Kingdom. If you come from Wales you're Welsh, not Scottish or English or anything else, no matter at what time you were born. Wales, Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland are all part of the British Isles. If you are Scottish you are also British. If you are English you are also British. If you are Welsh you are also British at the same time. You see how this works?


When you're talking historically, it's much more about tribal migration than any sort of geographical distinction. The first people on the Isles were the Celts and the Picts. Then the Romans invaded, but had pulled their government out right around the time Patrick was alive. After them came the Angles, Saxons and Jutes, then Vikings, and finally, Normans.

So if you want to call Patrick anything, call him a Briton. He was born in Wales and probably had a combination of Celtic and Roman blood. But you can't call him Welsh, because there wasn't a Wales back then - not until Uffa's Dyke was erected by the Mercian king, around 8th century or so.
 
2013-03-18 01:38:56 PM  
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St. Patrick (Tribett)
 
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