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(Toronto Star)   Nigerian prince scam works. Fark: Scammer was really Nigerian. Bonus: Victims were all lawyers   (thestar.com) divider line 63
    More: Stupid, Nigerians, Nigerian prince, legal assistance, ringleaders, U.S. Attorney  
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8893 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Mar 2013 at 8:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-16 08:10:11 PM
"Some law firms are pursuing legal action against banks that cleared the phony checks."

They are going to sue the banks because the lawyers failed to do due diligence and because they failed to wait until the checks cleared before remitting funds to their clients.

Of course they are.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-16 08:17:18 PM
Once the lawyers cashed the bogus cheques they would take a cut for their legal fee and wire the remaining funds to the fraudster overseas, usually to Asia.

Some guy achieved internet fame by converting a fake promotional check into five figures worth of cash. His story mentions a hard time limit after which a bank can no longer dishonor a check. He deposited the fake check, waited that time, moved the money into a safe deposit box, and the bank was screwed because the check didn't bounce until too late. http://patrickcombs.com/95g/.

Perhaps the lawyers should have read that story.
 
2013-03-16 08:53:35 PM

feckingmorons: "Some law firms are pursuing legal action against banks that cleared the phony checks."

They are going to sue the banks because the lawyers failed to do due diligence and because they failed to wait until the checks cleared before remitting funds to their clients.

Of course they are.


Depends on how things went down.  There are plenty of incidents where banks have said, "Yeah, that check cleared.  You're good."  Then they come back a month later and say, "About that check..."
 
2013-03-16 08:54:47 PM
dementedmole.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-16 08:55:52 PM
A firm I did some work with had one of these a couple years ago.  Due to the amount involved, they waited a few extra days and didn't end up getting bitten.  The scam was an ex-wife getting $150K from her ex-husband.  I saw the check when it was in the office.  It was a very nice piece of art work.  Heavy linen stock, watermarked, the whole deal.
 
2013-03-16 08:56:01 PM
vogeltalksrving.com
 
2013-03-16 09:03:23 PM
Lawyers are well read and trained, but they're not smarter on average.

It only makes sense that they'd fall for a simple trick that works on every other caste.
 
2013-03-16 09:04:59 PM
Nigerian prince, please.
 
2013-03-16 09:09:29 PM
It happens.
Link
 
2013-03-16 09:10:55 PM
how is "scammer was really nigerian" a thing?  That's why they call it that, subby.  That should be the "not news" part of the headline.
 
2013-03-16 09:13:33 PM
Bankers, lawyers and scammers. So no innocent people were wronged in this scheme.
 
m00
2013-03-16 09:15:51 PM

Bubonic Sam: Bankers, lawyers and scammers. So no innocent people were wronged in this scheme.


came for this, left satisfied.
 
2013-03-16 09:17:31 PM
Maybe the fact that THEY DIDN'T HAVE TO DO ANY WORK TO GET PAID should have clued them in.

I had a ad up online advertising my services as a math tutor and got emailed by someone trying to pull this scam. I told them that I did not accept payment until after I had tutored the kid and they disappeared.
 
2013-03-16 09:18:36 PM
FTA - "the Minneapolis firm Milavetz, Gallop & Milavetz"

The local daytime TV "Personal Injury" scheisters.
I'm having a hard time finding any sympathy for them.
 
2013-03-16 09:19:22 PM
On the one hand, this kind of thing really ends up hurting everyone in the long run, because it ultimately comes out of the bank's insurance, which comes out of the Federal reserve, which comes out of our pockets.

On the other hand, it was greedy lawyers looking to make a quick buck, so I'm just not that upset they got what they deserved.

Such a dilemma.
 
2013-03-16 09:21:42 PM
NotARocketScientist: Maybe the fact that THEY DIDN'T HAVE TO DO ANY WORK TO GET PAID should have clued them in.

In the land of lawyers, maybe they believe there IS such a thing as a free lunch.

/I'm sure there was work. Those manila folders just don't label themselves
//Not a lawyer
 
2013-03-16 09:24:39 PM
What would have been really funny is if one of the victims was a regular reader of Fark.
 
2013-03-16 09:25:17 PM

Gyrfalcon: it ultimately comes out of the bank's insurance, which comes out of the Federal reserve, which comes out of our pockets.


FDIC insurance does not work that way.
 
2013-03-16 09:27:04 PM

jaytkay: Gyrfalcon: it ultimately comes out of the bank's insurance, which comes out of the Federal reserve, which comes out of our pockets.

FDIC insurance does not work that way.


This is the Internet and she's making a point, stop interfering with "facts" and "knowledge".  Why do you hate freedom and happiness?
 
2013-03-16 09:28:23 PM
They should have asked the scammers to tattoo "baited by shiver" or a bison with "I give BJs" underneath the bison, on their arm if they really wanted the money like everyone else asks the scammers to do.
 
2013-03-16 09:28:53 PM
encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-03-16 09:29:39 PM

m00: Bubonic Sam: Bankers, lawyers and scammers. So no innocent people were wronged in this scheme.

came for this, left satisfied.


Yep, but who will they pass their losses onto?
 
2013-03-16 09:30:43 PM
"It was a very sophisticated scam . . .", one swindled mark bemoaned
 
2013-03-16 09:32:07 PM
i304.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-16 09:34:00 PM

serial_crusher: how is "scammer was really nigerian" a thing?  That's why they call it that, subby.  That should be the "not news" part of the headline.


I guess because Kenya was the last African country to pull a scam of this magnitude on the U.S.?
 
2013-03-16 09:45:04 PM

SomeoneDumb: NotARocketScientist: Maybe the fact that THEY DIDN'T HAVE TO DO ANY WORK TO GET PAID should have clued them in.

In the land of lawyers, maybe they believe there IS such a thing as a free lunch.

/I'm sure there was work. Those manila folders just don't label themselves
//Not a lawyer


Probably not a csb, but here goes anyway.  Last week my lawyer called to inform me she was withdrawing from my  social security disability case.  I understood, because it's kind of shaky and SSA sets the bar kind of high.  She sent me a letter restating what we'd talked about on the phone.  Along with that letter was a cc of the letter she sent SSA stating she was withdrawing from the case, but that she specifically was NOT withdrawing from getting paid (in accordance with time spent on the case or some such, all of a week) if I somehow still won.  Biatch can go fark herself, I'll give her a $20 and tell her to buy a bucket, fill it with water, stick her head in and wait and hour.
 
2013-03-16 09:45:15 PM
Oh, so now I can't say the n-word.
 
2013-03-16 09:47:08 PM
$DEITY as my witness, I don't know for whom I should be rooting for here.
 
2013-03-16 09:49:25 PM

serial_crusher: how is "scammer was really nigerian" a thing?  That's why they call it that, subby.  That should be the "not news" part of the headline.


Probably because he's Nigerian but was running the show from Canada.
You should be complaining about the "prince" part of the headline.  This isn't the Nigerian prince scam... no prince mentioned.
 
2013-03-16 09:50:08 PM

nebjammer: Oh, so now I can't say the n-word.


I'm pretty sure you can say Nigerian all you want.
 
2013-03-16 09:50:46 PM
A lawyer getting scammed? Im ok with this.
 
2013-03-16 09:52:14 PM

Arumat: Probably not a csb, but here goes anyway.  Last week my lawyer called to inform me she was withdrawing from my  social security disability case.  I understood, because it's kind of shaky and SSA sets the bar kind of high.  She sent me a letter restating what we'd talked about on the phone.  Along with that letter was a cc of the letter she sent SSA stating she was withdrawing from the case, but that she specifically was NOT withdrawing from getting paid (in accordance with time spent on the case or some such, all of a week) if I somehow still won.  Biatch can go fark herself, I'll give her a $20 and tell her to buy a bucket, fill it with water, stick her head in and wait and hour.


So, that is what pro-bono means now a days?  I wouldn't go with the head in a bucket for an hour bit, she'll do it and send you the bill for the hour.  Sharks breath under water, don't you know.
 
2013-03-16 09:54:16 PM
Bad timing.  They did this on 'Person of Interest" last Thursday.
 
2013-03-16 09:54:40 PM

MrHappyRotter: jaytkay: Gyrfalcon: it ultimately comes out of the bank's insurance, which comes out of the Federal reserve, which comes out of our pockets.

FDIC insurance does not work that way.

This is the Internet and she's making a point, stop interfering with "facts" and "knowledge".  Why do you hate freedom and happiness?


Oh, piffle, FDIC comes from the government which eventually comes out of the taxpayers' pockets and I'm not writing a screed on exactly how in a one-line Fark comment. The point is that eventually what hurts the banks hurts everyone; and if you don't think so, rewind a few years to the bank collapses of 2008-2009 and we all know how well WE the common man fared from the ebil banks collapsing.

On the other hand, MrHappy did realize that I'm a woman, so that's good.
 
2013-03-16 10:03:37 PM

feckingmorons: "Some law firms are pursuing legal action against banks that cleared the phony checks."

They are going to sue the banks because the lawyers failed to do due diligence and because they failed to wait until the checks cleared before remitting funds to their clients.

Of course they are.


Hope the lawyers enjoy having every cent of the cheques they deposit now held for 30 days.
 
2013-03-16 10:07:42 PM

Gyrfalcon: Oh, piffle


Not piffle. Did the FDIC send your bank a check the last time you spent too much on restaurants or shopping?
 
2013-03-16 10:19:32 PM
This is sad. Kind of think we need PSAs and to teach kids in school what scams look like. Soon I'll be old and naive and I don't want this shiat happening to me.
 
m00
2013-03-16 10:20:16 PM

calufrax: m00: Bubonic Sam: Bankers, lawyers and scammers. So no innocent people were wronged in this scheme.

came for this, left satisfied.

Yep, but who will they pass their losses onto?


Imagine there's no bankers
It's easy if you're middle class
No 1% getting bailouts
And farking us in the ass
Imagine all the people keeping their own cash

Imagine there's no police force
Hassling you every day
Not getting arrested for nothing
And locked up due to a crooked DA
Imagine all the people living life in peace

You, you may say
I'm a crazy wingnut, but I'm not the only one
I hope some day you'll stop voting for douchebags
And the world will be as one

Imagine no oppression
I wonder if you know
There's no need for economic theories
to perpetuate the status quo
Imagine all the common people making a living wage

You, you may say
I'm a crazy wingnut, but I'm not the only one
I hope some day you'll stop voting for douchebags
And the world will be as one
 
2013-03-16 10:25:42 PM

jaytkay: Gyrfalcon: Oh, piffle

Not piffle. Did the FDIC send your bank a check the last time you spent too much on restaurants or shopping?


??
 
2013-03-16 10:27:27 PM
So the scam artist forges a check made out to a real company. The lawyer  thinks, "hey I'm not stupid, I'll wait till it clears and the money is paid out."

The term "cleared" means the bank checked to see if the company has sufficient funds to cover the amount. That may take up to a week. The bank then releases the funds. The actual check will normally take longer than that to reach the company's accounting department where it's discovered to be a forgery and the company disputes the check. The bank gets back to the lawyer with the bad news. The scammer by then has his cut and is long gone.
 
2013-03-16 10:33:33 PM

Gyrfalcon: jaytkay: Gyrfalcon: Oh, piffle

Not piffle. Did the FDIC send your bank a check the last time you spent too much on restaurants or shopping?

??


OK, educate me.

A US law firm stupidly wired funds from its account to an overseas scammer.

Tell me how and when the FDIC reimburses the US law firm. Be specific. Take your time.
 
2013-03-16 10:35:06 PM
I would assume that once the banks cleared the check then any shennanigans that happen after that become the banks' responsibility and that's what "cleared" means. Good luck fighting that in court. Not that anyone cares which one wins in a snake fight.
 
2013-03-16 10:42:40 PM
Oh yeah, Those are the lawyers I want working for me. (NOT)
 
2013-03-16 10:48:47 PM
Looking forward to reading about someone using the details of the court case to rinse, repeat.
 
2013-03-16 11:47:38 PM

Bart Farker: FTA - "the Minneapolis firm Milavetz, Gallop & Milavetz"

The local daytime TV "Personal Injury" scheisters.
I'm having a hard time finding any sympathy for them.


They don't just do personal injury. I've known someone that they helped with a major, serious, going away for a long time type of case. He didn't go to jail, so Milavetz did something right. (Yes, it was actually Milavetz that represented him.)
 
2013-03-16 11:47:42 PM

jaytkay: Gyrfalcon: jaytkay: Gyrfalcon: Oh, piffle

Not piffle. Did the FDIC send your bank a check the last time you spent too much on restaurants or shopping?

??

OK, educate me.

A US law firm stupidly wired funds from its account to an overseas scammer.

Tell me how and when the FDIC reimburses the US law firm. Be specific. Take your time.


??? ???

I already said I wasn't writing a dissertation on how harm to the banks eventually impacts everyone down here on the ground. It's enough that what impacts the bank impacts all of us eventually. So I used the wrong nomenclature. So sue me.

I can't even recall what my original point was. Who cares?
 
2013-03-17 02:05:19 AM
so they arrest a guy. he pleads guilty. so what. i'm willing to bet the lawyers or the banks don't get any of their money back.
 
2013-03-17 02:06:29 AM

Gyrfalcon: It's enough that what impacts the bank impacts all of us eventually.


Something tells me that "all of us" won't see one iota of any effect from these idiots getting scammed.
 
2013-03-17 04:07:22 AM

Gyrfalcon: On the one hand, this kind of thing really ends up hurting everyone in the long run, because it ultimately comes out of the bank's insurance, which comes out of the Federal reserve, which comes out of our pockets.

On the other hand, it was greedy lawyers looking to make a quick buck, so I'm just not that upset they got what they deserved.

Such a dilemma.


Phony cashier's checks don't work that way if they're deposited by account holders.  The depositor is liable.  You sell your Harley and get a phony cashier's check, you're out the Harley AND the money.  The lack of being able to immediately verify cashier's checks makes them almost useless.  They have the panache of sounding official and trustworthy and yet people are getting screwed every day.

The world practically runs on instant transactions but it can take a month or so to figure out a cashier's check is fake.
 
2013-03-17 04:10:48 AM

OscarTamerz: I would assume that once the banks cleared the check then any shennanigans that happen after that become the banks' responsibility and that's what "cleared" means. Good luck fighting that in court. Not that anyone cares which one wins in a snake fight.


Which is exactly why so many people end up poorer by not heeding the warnings on Craigslist.  You can't get out of it that easy.
 
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