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(Slate)   "I'm sorry my autistic child is acting out. Let me tell you how you need to deal with it"   (slate.com) divider line 429
    More: Interesting, acting out, sensitivity training  
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18004 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Mar 2013 at 4:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-16 04:21:46 PM

MeanJean: kxs401

This "everything is for everyone" attitude is ruining humanity.

Yes, lets lock the disabled up in institutions where they get treated like shiat or hide them in the attic instead of accommodating them to spare YOUR delicate feefees.

Sorry that my disabled friend is delaying your journey because it takes a little time for her wheelchair to be strapped into the college transport van. I'll have her personally apologize to you for not being able to farking walk.

The nerve of the disabled, wanting to participate in society. How dare they want to contribute and live their lives?


Hey now, we put them in basements, chained to the oil tank where it's a little warmer. Plus you can't hear them shuffling around like you can in an attic.

Also, participating isn't disrupting. I got squats calling in 26 minutes.
 
2013-03-16 04:22:30 PM

tallguywithglasseson: Cup_O_Jo: Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.

To who?


Come on, that's really wrong and offensive.

It's "To whom?"
 
2013-03-16 04:23:16 PM

miniflea: Is it just me, or is that actually a pretty reasonable response from the old guy?


Yeah, angrily cutting off an embarrassed and apologetic mother mid-sentence is a perfectly reasonable response to having been in the same room as a developmentally challenged child who, in the course of having a good time, was a little louder than you would have preferred.
 
2013-03-16 04:23:34 PM

I_C_Weener: Popcorn Johnny: You don't get a free pass to disturb others in public places just because you have a disability.

I'm sorry my cancer stricken son's wheel chair is taking up most of the elevator, perhaps you should deal with it


I don't think those with physical disabilities are the problem. (very sorry about your son, by the way)

It just seems like these days, almost every family has a kid with some kind of mental or behavioral issue. Right or wrong, sometimes others just get sick of hearing about it. While I'm sure most of these kids really have some issues, I think some of these "conditions of the day" get over diagnosed and so the ones who genuinely have them get lumped in with the ones who really just need some competent parenting.
 
2013-03-16 04:24:28 PM
So if my toddler is acting out at a restaraunt, does everyone have to be tolerant?
 
2013-03-16 04:25:07 PM

Deece: miniflea: Is it just me, or is that actually a pretty reasonable response from the old guy?

Yeah, angrily cutting off an embarrassed and apologetic mother mid-sentence is a perfectly reasonable response to having been in the same room as a developmentally challenged child who, in the course of having a good time, was a little louder than you would have preferred.


She was repeating herself. I would be like Ok get out of my face. Especially because 2 adults with 8 kids is ASININE.
 
2013-03-16 04:25:27 PM

Cup_O_Jo: #1. Autism from what I have learned in the last years is not a DISABILITY. I am disabled. I have MS.
Please don't compare me to the Mentally "disabled". I would appreciate it. Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.
#2. I don't get a free pass to do whatever I want. If I forget my cane and fall onto someone's wedding cake---"oh sorry" is not going to work. Instead I go places prepared to handle my condition whatever it is that day.
#3. All people mentioned had a caretaker. Maybe the Mom should have been sitting closer to her son-paying more attention to him. Maybe the sister should have her brother on a leash. And maybe the writer should understand I don't want your teenage sons grubby hands all in my freaking salad bar.
This article to me is one of those "it takes a village to raise a child and my child (ect) is autisitic so you should learn how to deal with it. WHEN in fact people should be learning how to handle it themselves, Society is nerfed enough. Yes, we understand your child has special needs however, you need to understand YOU are going to have to do extra work to have them in society.


I agree, it is demeaning. After all, their bodies work!

What, you have a "better" disability? Is your disability superior? I hope a helpful tard pushes your chair into traffic.
 
2013-03-16 04:25:40 PM

Popcorn Johnny: You don't get a free pass to disturb others in public places just because you have a disability.


THIS.

If they can't handle being out in most public places, don't subject others to their actions.

My brother is autistic, and at age 28, he is more obnoxious to deal with than almost any run of the mill 6 year old child in public. What makes it worse is that he refuses to exercise control over the volume of his voice, and constantly makes very disturbing, violent, and sexual comments and actions (although I can assure you he has never gotten laid, at least by a human). Whenever I go to visit my mother, my wife and I pretty much refuse to go out in public with him because of his behavior. What makes it worse is that my mother figured out a long time ago that his disability can be exploited for sympathy from others and government money, so she has done next to nothing to deal with his condition. Due to the circumstances, my wife and I jointly made the decision that our now 8-month old daughter will never be left unsupervised by at least one of us around my mother's house, unless he is institutionalized and away from the home. So, it sucks that she will not get to have the week away with Grandma, but I would not risk my daughter being molested or killed.

Sorry, but "He's autistic, deal with it" will not fly with me.
 
2013-03-16 04:25:59 PM

Deece: Yeah, angrily cutting off an embarrassed and apologetic mother mid-sentence is a perfectly reasonable response to having been in the same room as a developmentally challenged child who, in the course of having a good time, was a little louder than you would have preferred.


How much do you want to bet that her description of the events are a bit tilted in her favor? Perhaps even missing information or possibly understating her kids actions and\or overstating the other patrons actions.
 
2013-03-16 04:26:11 PM
Fark: where regular kids irritate the hell out of us, but ones with developmental disorders don't.

I wonder how people will rect if autistic adults smoked in bars while tipping only at 10%.
 
2013-03-16 04:26:26 PM

Ennuipoet: To be fair, it's getting might difficult to distinguish between the developmentally disabled and the genuine assholes.    Numerically speaking, there are many more genuine assholes, so perhaps we could the assholes wear a special hat or something.  Or a t-shirt reading "I possess all my mental faculties, I am just a dick."


i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-16 04:27:29 PM

tallguywithglasseson: Cup_O_Jo: Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.

To whom?


/FTFY
 
2013-03-16 04:27:36 PM

ReverendJynxed: Cup_O_Jo: #1. Autism from what I have learned in the last years is not a DISABILITY. I am disabled. I have MS.
Please don't compare me to the Mentally "disabled". I would appreciate it. Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.
#2. I don't get a free pass to do whatever I want. If I forget my cane and fall onto someone's wedding cake---"oh sorry" is not going to work. Instead I go places prepared to handle my condition whatever it is that day.
#3. All people mentioned had a caretaker. Maybe the Mom should have been sitting closer to her son-paying more attention to him. Maybe the sister should have her brother on a leash. And maybe the writer should understand I don't want your teenage sons grubby hands all in my freaking salad bar.
This article to me is one of those "it takes a village to raise a child and my child (ect) is autisitic so you should learn how to deal with it. WHEN in fact people should be learning how to handle it themselves, Society is nerfed enough. Yes, we understand your child has special needs however, you need to understand YOU are going to have to do extra work to have them in society.

I agree, it is demeaning. After all, their bodies work!

What, you have a "better" disability? Is your disability superior? I hope a helpful tard pushes your chair into traffic.


No mentally disabled is way different than physically disabled. But hey you want to lump us all in together you go ahead. I hope you live life with all your limbs and brain working.
 
2013-03-16 04:27:36 PM

tallguywithglasseson: Cup_O_Jo: Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.

To who?


Nice. Beat me to this one.
 
2013-03-16 04:27:40 PM
Let me get this straight. He hushed her kid, she told him it wouldn't work because the kid is autistic, he said sorry, she kept talking, he told her he understood her, she got angry.

How is he in the wrong at all here?

If I'm supposed to be understanding to autistic folks, she can try to be understanding of older folks. If she thought that was bad, my blind, decrepit grandfather could have her crying. Toughen up lady - he was short with you, not mean.
 
2013-03-16 04:28:02 PM
We all have to deal with a-holes, just because someone is autistic doesn't mean they are free from this blight.  The woman said it herself, the vast majority of people understand an accept what it means to raise an autistic child.  "But I think we can do better"  Yes, that can be said for everything
 
2013-03-16 04:28:13 PM

WTFdoesitmatter: autistic, and at age 28, he is more obnoxious to deal with than almost any run of the mill 6 year old child in public. What makes it worse is that he refuses to exercise control over the volume of his voice, and constantly makes very disturbing, violent, and sexual comments and actions


What's his Fark handle?
 
2013-03-16 04:28:41 PM
I'm sorry your daughter couldn't tolerate my disabled son smiling at her with both of his hands down his pants. I wish she wasn't a Nazi.
 
2013-03-16 04:29:21 PM

namegoeshere: So if my toddler is acting out at a restaraunt, does everyone have to be tolerant?


I will tolerate you dealing with it appropriately when it happens. If that means a few stern words at the table, taking the kid outside or even leaving the restaurant with the food to go and beating the little tyke within an inch of their life when you get home. Just don't do nothing and laughingly say that little kyle is being cute when he is actually being a disruptive little monster.

Is that too much to ask?
 
2013-03-16 04:29:51 PM

namegoeshere: So if my toddler is acting out at a restaraunt, does everyone have to be tolerant?


Absolutely!
 
2013-03-16 04:31:07 PM

Cup_O_Jo: ReverendJynxed: Cup_O_Jo: #1. Autism from what I have learned in the last years is not a DISABILITY. I am disabled. I have MS.
Please don't compare me to the Mentally "disabled". I would appreciate it. Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.
#2. I don't get a free pass to do whatever I want. If I forget my cane and fall onto someone's wedding cake---"oh sorry" is not going to work. Instead I go places prepared to handle my condition whatever it is that day.
#3. All people mentioned had a caretaker. Maybe the Mom should have been sitting closer to her son-paying more attention to him. Maybe the sister should have her brother on a leash. And maybe the writer should understand I don't want your teenage sons grubby hands all in my freaking salad bar.
This article to me is one of those "it takes a village to raise a child and my child (ect) is autisitic so you should learn how to deal with it. WHEN in fact people should be learning how to handle it themselves, Society is nerfed enough. Yes, we understand your child has special needs however, you need to understand YOU are going to have to do extra work to have them in society.

I agree, it is demeaning. After all, their bodies work!

What, you have a "better" disability? Is your disability superior? I hope a helpful tard pushes your chair into traffic.

No mentally disabled is way different than physically disabled. But hey you want to lump us all in together you go ahead. I hope you live life with all your limbs and brain working.


Funny thing is not everything is "working" according to the powers that be 9physical AND mental.) I'm just not going to say I'm better than someone else with disabilities because mine aren't as severe or limiting.

I'm not THAT much of an asshole even if you are.
 
2013-03-16 04:31:54 PM

super_grass: What's his Fark handle?


Drew.
 
2013-03-16 04:32:12 PM

Radioactive Ass: namegoeshere: So if my toddler is acting out at a restaraunt, does everyone have to be tolerant?

I will tolerate you dealing with it appropriately when it happens. If that means a few stern words at the table, taking the kid outside or even leaving the restaurant with the food to go and beating the little tyke within an inch of their life when you get home. Just don't do nothing and laughingly say that little kyle is being cute when he is actually being a disruptive little monster.

Is that too much to ask?


The same do nothing that most parents of autism kids do?
 
2013-03-16 04:32:17 PM
He has been scowled at on airplanes, in movie theaters, in restaurants, and in bookstores. And I get it-I prefer a quiet airplane ride as much as the next person.

The thing is, you probably don't prefer quiet as much as I do. I have Asperger's, and part of that is that I have a really low tolerance for loud, high-pitched, and/or irregularly spaced noises. A loud crowd? I can deal. A single shrieking person? My ears will single that out for special attention. I am not capable of distracting myself from it. It can cause me to have a panic attack if I can't escape the source of the noise.

So what do I do in situations like this? Am I just screwed because my disability conflicts with the more severe disabilities of others?
 
2013-03-16 04:32:27 PM

great_tigers: namegoeshere: So if my toddler is acting out at a restaraunt, does everyone have to be tolerant?

Absolutely!


Of the toddler yes, of the parents no.
 
2013-03-16 04:33:33 PM
My daughter is very deep in the autistic range.. she doesn't speak and public outings are very limited.

We manage to go to restaurants twice this year and things actually went very well.  We explained to the restaurant that we needed to be seated close to the washroom and out of people's way so that she may not try to reach and grab someone IF she is "triggered" by something.

Never had an issue.

If someone was to give me stupid attitude, I'd simply reply that "she's handicapped, what's your excuse".
 
2013-03-16 04:33:48 PM

Cup_O_Jo: tallguywithglasseson: Cup_O_Jo: Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.

To who?

To physically handicapped. It takes us back to the dark ages when polio patients,mentally retarded,and the like were locked away in the mental hospital which is 3rd complete different thing.


Yup. Exactly this. I am hearing impaired and have been since my teens. I get a lot of bullshiat from people and lots of weird looks and since i am not 'typical' deaf as in nonverbal and sign language people are very confused and generally treat me like I have a mental disability.
 
2013-03-16 04:34:38 PM
Over a few years, when our kids were younger, my wife and I tried to take our boys out to eat about 3 or 4 times but then just gave up. We'd take turns walking them around in front of the restaurant while he settled down, only to come back to cold food and the other one starting to go off about something only to switch places and eat alone anyway. Now they're 3 and 5 and actually get compliments from strangers about just how awesome and well behaved they are. I think people have much lower social standards these days. They're good kids, but they're not that good.
 
2013-03-16 04:34:46 PM
I didn't take my kids to restaurants 1) until they were old enough to know how to behave and 2) unless they were well rested. I didn't impose on the global village to help socialize my child in a place where people go to relax and unwind.

The thought of actors screwing with patrons to prove some point is the height of DB'ery.  Let's all cheer for ourselves, we're all so special.
 
2013-03-16 04:35:03 PM
Here's a question to ponder. You're out in public, and some autistic crotchfruit smacks you hard from behind, and the mother tells you to deal with it because her child is just 'acting out.' What would you do about it?
 
2013-03-16 04:35:22 PM

Deece: Yeah, angrily cutting off an embarrassed and apologetic mother mid-sentence is a perfectly reasonable response to having been in the same room as a developmentally challenged child who, in the course of having a good time, was a little louder than you would have preferred.


I'm pretty sure "old guy" was embarrassed too. If you somehow missed the fact a kid was confined to a wheelchair (perhaps because he's seated at a table and his wheelchair is obscured from your vantage point) and asked them to stand up, and the mother pipes up to say "um, my son is a paraplegic", you'd be instantly redfaced and probably wouldn't be terribly amused to hear her follow up with  "...which means he has no use of legs, etc" in front of everyone. You'd feel like such a goddamn ass after the first gutpunch you don't want to hear anything else.

Not so much condoning it as thinking his reaction is somewhat normal.
 
2013-03-16 04:35:26 PM

Chinchillazilla: He has been scowled at on airplanes, in movie theaters, in restaurants, and in bookstores. And I get it-I prefer a quiet airplane ride as much as the next person.

The thing is, you probably don't prefer quiet as much as I do. I have Asperger's, and part of that is that I have a really low tolerance for loud, high-pitched, and/or irregularly spaced noises. A loud crowd? I can deal. A single shrieking person? My ears will single that out for special attention. I am not capable of distracting myself from it. It can cause me to have a panic attack if I can't escape the source of the noise.

So what do I do in situations like this? Am I just screwed because my disability conflicts with the more severe disabilities of others?


Sadly yes because their child is the most important thing int heir universe and you mean nothing in comparison. It sucks but I tend to rely on both sunglasses and earphones everywhere because of those issues. We have a way to attempting to cope though and the child is still learning to do so. A bit of grace for the kids and none for the parents that aren't helping.

Try headphones.
 
2013-03-16 04:35:59 PM

Cup_O_Jo: No mentally disabled is way different than physically disabled. But hey you want to lump us all in together you go ahead. I hope you live life with all your limbs and brain working.


So you would be just fine with a mentally retarded person being insulted by being called "disabled" because it included people like you?
 
2013-03-16 04:36:18 PM

great_tigers: The same do nothing that most parents of autism kids do?


With Autistic kids also jerking their leash is acceptable.

As long as it has a choke collar...
 
2013-03-16 04:36:29 PM

Ennuipoet: To be fair, it's getting might difficult to distinguish between the developmentally disabled and the genuine assholes.    Numerically speaking, there are many more genuine assholes, so perhaps we could the assholes wear a special hat or something.  Or a t-shirt reading "I possess all my mental faculties, I am just a dick."


So first I pictured a yellow star, and then Andy DIck. I'm pretty sure every part of my thought was offensive. I must have the autiz.
 
2013-03-16 04:37:06 PM

imfallen_angel: My daughter is very deep in the autistic range.. she doesn't speak and public outings are very limited.

We manage to go to restaurants twice this year and things actually went very well.  We explained to the restaurant that we needed to be seated close to the washroom and out of people's way so that she may not try to reach and grab someone IF she is "triggered" by something.

Never had an issue.

If someone was to give me stupid attitude, I'd simply reply that "she's handicapped, what's your excuse".


Thanks for being a good parent. Farkied.
 
2013-03-16 04:37:07 PM

ReverendJynxed: Funny thing is not everything is "working" according to the powers that be 9physical AND mental.) I'm just not going to say I'm better than someone else with disabilities because mine aren't as severe or limiting.

I'm not THAT much of an asshole even if you are.


Let me start by saying that I'm not a cripple and, no matter what my brother calls me, not mentally retarded. So this is based on people I've known.

But there is a difference in the two. Someone who needs a cane or a wheelchair and can take care of themselves is flat out different than an adult who needs a caretaker. They aren't worth more as people, but it is different. And when you start saying everyone with some sort of disability is the same, you're implicitly telling some people (who work hard to stay independent) that they need to be taken care of, which is a reasonable reason to be insulted.
 
2013-03-16 04:38:52 PM
If the world is for everyone and we need to share, then this mother needs to learn to share with arseholes
 
2013-03-16 04:39:18 PM

miniflea: He wasn't exceedingly loud, but the oddness of his behavior had clearly caught the attention of an older gentleman at the one other table occupied at that early hour.

"Shhhhhhh," he hissed from across the room.

Everyone at the table instantly froze-except, of course, for Jonah. "I'm sorry," I explained, rising from my seat and taking a few steps toward him so I wouldn't have to holler. "My son is autistic ... "

"Oh, sorry," he said.

"He's not trying to disturb you intentionally ... "

"I heard you the first time," he snapped.

My face burned as I returned to my seat, his gratuitous nastiness instantly draining the joy from my evening.


Is it just me, or is that actually a pretty reasonable response from the old guy?


It's not just you.
 
2013-03-16 04:39:43 PM

This About That: Anybody remember back in the day, when the kid got loud, one of his parents would pick him up and carry him outside until he settled down? How is it that some kid's parents' rights instilled the obligation upon the rest of us to put up with his crap? What happened to our rights?


"Freedom to" trumps "freedom from" because baby Jesus. Now STFU, hater!
 
2013-03-16 04:39:48 PM

MeanJean: kxs401

This "everything is for everyone" attitude is ruining humanity.

Yes, lets lock the disabled up in institutions where they get treated like shiat or hide them in the attic instead of accommodating them to spare YOUR delicate feefees.

Sorry that my disabled friend is delaying your journey because it takes a little time for her wheelchair to be strapped into the college transport van. I'll have her personally apologize to you for not being able to farking walk.

The nerve of the disabled, wanting to participate in society. How dare they want to contribute and live their lives?


The faux outrage over your friend/son/mother's condition is petulant at best.  You are asking me to adjust my behavior and expectations because of your situation.  For the most part I am prepared to do that.  But what irks me is when there is no give or take on your side.  You (this is the generic "you") act like the entire world should kiss your ass because of your companion's disability.  The writer of the article lambasted the old man who told her he heard her the first time.  Was he to sit there and listen to her preach and whine and prattle, or could he not just tell her to STFU because he got the message she sent?  She wanted the stage in the restaurant, and he denied her.  That's what really ticked her off.  If you need to pack a wheelchair on the bus, just do it as efficiently and quietly as possible.  We all see you.  If your kid is autistic, we may not be able to differentiate between autism and the rest of the undisciplined, obnoxious crotchfruit that populate the planet.  Make a small effort to tone the kid down, rather the acting like he can do what he wants because of his "disability".

My nephew is is wheelchair bound paraplegic.  I enjoy taking him to hockey games.  We arrive early and leave a bit later to avoid the crowds.  I understand that it inconveniences some, but most also understand he needs a bit of space to maneuver.

Everyone needs to lighten up and remember that give and take goes both ways.  The writer of the article appears to be a taker.
 
2013-03-16 04:39:51 PM

ReverendJynxed: Cup_O_Jo: ReverendJynxed: Cup_O_Jo: #1. Autism from what I have learned in the last years is not a DISABILITY. I am disabled. I have MS.
Please don't compare me to the Mentally "disabled". I would appreciate it. Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.
#2. I don't get a free pass to do whatever I want. If I forget my cane and fall onto someone's wedding cake---"oh sorry" is not going to work. Instead I go places prepared to handle my condition whatever it is that day.
#3. All people mentioned had a caretaker. Maybe the Mom should have been sitting closer to her son-paying more attention to him. Maybe the sister should have her brother on a leash. And maybe the writer should understand I don't want your teenage sons grubby hands all in my freaking salad bar.
This article to me is one of those "it takes a village to raise a child and my child (ect) is autisitic so you should learn how to deal with it. WHEN in fact people should be learning how to handle it themselves, Society is nerfed enough. Yes, we understand your child has special needs however, you need to understand YOU are going to have to do extra work to have them in society.

I agree, it is demeaning. After all, their bodies work!

What, you have a "better" disability? Is your disability superior? I hope a helpful tard pushes your chair into traffic.

No mentally disabled is way different than physically disabled. But hey you want to lump us all in together you go ahead. I hope you live life with all your limbs and brain working.

Funny thing is not everything is "working" according to the powers that be 9physical AND mental.) I'm just not going to say I'm better than someone else with disabilities because mine aren't as severe or limiting.

I'm not THAT much of an asshole even if you are.


Except... MS screws with your brain too. My mother has MS and she has severe brain lesions to the point where her memory is horrible and stuff like that.
 
2013-03-16 04:41:02 PM

I May Be Crazy But...: Let me get this straight. He hushed her kid, she told him it wouldn't work because the kid is autistic, he said sorry, she kept talking, he told her he understood her, she got angry.

How is he in the wrong at all here?

If I'm supposed to be understanding to autistic folks, she can try to be understanding of older folks. If she thought that was bad, my blind, decrepit grandfather could have her crying. Toughen up lady - he was short with you, not mean.


Perhaps her son's lack of social skills isn't solely caused by his autism.
 
2013-03-16 04:41:25 PM

Cup_O_Jo: #1. Autism from what I have learned in the last years is not a DISABILITY. I am disabled. I have MS.
Please don't compare me to the Mentally "disabled". I would appreciate it. Lumping mental retardation in with physical handicapped people is demeaning.
#2. I don't get a free pass to do whatever I want. If I forget my cane and fall onto someone's wedding cake---"oh sorry" is not going to work. Instead I go places prepared to handle my condition whatever it is that day.
#3. All people mentioned had a caretaker. Maybe the Mom should have been sitting closer to her son-paying more attention to him. Maybe the sister should have her brother on a leash. And maybe the writer should understand I don't want your teenage sons grubby hands all in my freaking salad bar.
This article to me is one of those "it takes a village to raise a child and my child (ect) is autisitic so you should learn how to deal with it. WHEN in fact people should be learning how to handle it themselves, Society is nerfed enough. Yes, we understand your child has special needs however, you need to understand YOU are going to have to do extra work to have them in society.



I really get annoyed at people with a "Visible Disability" think they are more deserving of help and basic compassion then someone with a non-visible disability

if i say i cant do something because this is a my leg/knee is hurting a lot that day, i get "O you have a bad limp sorry"

if i say i cant doing something because my anxiety is currently at 11 and it is taken every fiber of my being to not shut down, i get told "Suck it up"
 
2013-03-16 04:41:38 PM

ThatGuyGreg: Oh good, this thread again.

I still get a kick not my not autistic but still developmentally disabled 3 year old daughter behaves 1000x better than "normal" kids twice her age when we're out in public.

/she saves her meltdowns for home


Heh, our 2.5 year old has her daycare person convinced she is perfect.  She wonders why we sometimes ask, "how did she behave today?"  It's because she saves it all up for home!  Finally, she acted out at daycare, and she said, "I think I understand why you ask the things you do, now."

In the end, it is because they know their parents and it is "safe" to let it loose.
 
2013-03-16 04:41:48 PM
This autism spectrum gets wider and wider every day.
 
2013-03-16 04:42:07 PM

Matthew Keene: Here's a question to ponder. You're out in public, and some autistic crotchfruit smacks you hard from behind, and the mother tells you to deal with it because her child is just 'acting out.' What would you do about it?


Well, I'm a psychopath. So I would probably "act out".

We cool?
 
2013-03-16 04:42:12 PM

I_C_Weener: Popcorn Johnny: You don't get a free pass to disturb others in public places just because you have a disability.

I'm sorry my cancer stricken son's wheel chair is taking up most of the elevator, perhaps you should deal with it


Maybe the lazy little brat can just walk.
 
2013-03-16 04:43:05 PM
What is the big deal if he never gets to eat out at a restaurant or go to a movie? Have a nice family dinner at home and watch Netflix. It's not so terrible.
 
2013-03-16 04:43:25 PM

Cup_O_Jo: Deece: miniflea: Is it just me, or is that actually a pretty reasonable response from the old guy?

Yeah, angrily cutting off an embarrassed and apologetic mother mid-sentence is a perfectly reasonable response to having been in the same room as a developmentally challenged child who, in the course of having a good time, was a little louder than you would have preferred.

She was repeating herself. I would be like Ok get out of my face. Especially because 2 adults with 8 kids is ASININE.


That's what I was thinking.  I've seen my in-laws struggle with their four when it's both of them together.  I can't imagine handling 8 kids with 2 adults, especially when one of them is prone to loud outbursts.  That's just dumb.
 
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