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(The New York Times)   How beer gave us civilization. Step one: by being delicious. Step two: by being alcoholic. Step three: there is no step three. Steps one and two were enough   (nytimes.com) divider line 91
    More: Spiffy, Eastern Mediterranean, domestications, cultures  
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4757 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Mar 2013 at 8:23 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-15 09:50:59 PM  

Clock Spider Jerusalem: i heard the original bread yeast was created by a woman sticking her finger in her snatch & then kneading the dough. behold the goddess of the wonder bread!


I must concede the level of grossness to you my friend... that was absolutely icky.
media.tumblr.com
 
2013-03-15 10:01:54 PM  
Fact: Mankind learned from animals that eating fermented fruit laying on the ground would make you feel better (loopy).
Fact: Mankind perfected this animalistic discovery.
 
2013-03-15 10:05:34 PM  
 
2013-03-15 10:07:42 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: crotchgrabber: Some of you farkers may not agree with me, but I'm going to go out on a limb with this one. Consequences be damned...

I love beer.

"I Like Beer," Tom T. Hall


Dangit.

Well... leaving satisfied, then.
 
2013-03-15 10:17:30 PM  
Step 3: Proving the paleotards wrong again. Grains are good.
 
2013-03-15 10:25:29 PM  
I read somewhere (I don't remember) that the earliest beers in Mesopotamia were made by putting old bread in water and fermenting that mess. I'll stick with barely.
 
2013-03-15 10:26:05 PM  

CygnusDarius: fusillade762: Fear_and_Loathing: Step 3: Was it was safer than the water.

This. I can't believe TFA didn't mention that part. When you live in large cities with poor sanitation booze becomes crucial. It also explains why American Indians generally don't tolerate alcohol well.

Also, the pilgrims didn't trust water, but they didn't bring beer with them (they drank it, I guess), so they made beer... With acorn.


they most certainly brought beer with them, they were drunk off their ass the entire journey! you can look up in the ledgers, "running low on vitules, especially BEER!"
they landed where they did because they were lost and running low on beer, so instead of going all the way down to Virginia where they were headed, they landed up in what i now Massachusetts  so they could find fresh water, in order to make.. more beer.

and they may have used acorns, but what the mostly used was the native squashes, including pumpkins which leads to colonial pumpkin ale which doesn't taste like the modern pumpkin pie in a glass stuff we have nowadays.. they didn't have those ingredients. no spices, no malted barely wheat, or oats. And that pumpkin/squash beer was more of a wine and tasted like ass!. but, the alcohol in it kept it sanitary, and therefor potable. and that was the intent.
 
2013-03-15 10:26:20 PM  
Barley
 
2013-03-15 10:26:53 PM  

revrendjim: I read somewhere (I don't remember) that the earliest beers in Mesopotamia were made by putting old bread in water and fermenting that mess. I'll stick with barely.


did you see my post earlier?
 
2013-03-15 10:33:34 PM  

Genju: I like almost all beers. But I LOVE Belgian Golden/Dubbel/Tripel/Quad/Dark Strong, and Baltic Porters.  If any of you Boston area farkers could PLEASE send me a Jack's Abbey Framinghammer  Baltic Porter aged in the Bourbon barrel I would love you so much....


How can you list all those belgian styles without the best of the lot? Sour Red Ales!
/or at least geuze.
 
2013-03-15 10:40:07 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com

"When you're sick, beer's what you want. Like liquid bread."
 
2013-03-15 10:43:51 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: revrendjim: I read somewhere (I don't remember) that the earliest beers in Mesopotamia were made by putting old bread in water and fermenting that mess. I'll stick with barely.

did you see my post earlier?


No I didn't. But now I did, and I tip my hat in your general direction.
 
2013-03-15 10:44:51 PM  
I realize I'm comment #63, but beer was popular because you could brew it in the fall and it wouldn't go bad during winter.  It was mans first refrigerator progenitor.
 
2013-03-15 11:05:33 PM  
"Midas' Touch" is a beer among Dogfish Head's "Ancient Ales" series. A drinking vessel was found from the 8th century BC, about 2700 years ago. It was studied at the University of Pennsylvania. There they found that the vessel had traces of ingredients that were probably used in making beer. The University got in touch with Tom Peters of Monk's Cafe to produce a similar ale. Peters decided that Dogfish Brewery was best suited to the task and now we can have it again! tada.
 
2013-03-15 11:20:14 PM  
the downfall of civilization is hopps
was all uphill till people started putting that shiat in ale
 
2013-03-15 11:22:53 PM  
Oh yeah, just like they said on that pop pseudoscience show on netflix.
 
2013-03-15 11:26:14 PM  
Even ponies like beer.

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-03-15 11:38:33 PM  

Ablejack: Genju: I like almost all beers. But I LOVE Belgian Golden/Dubbel/Tripel/Quad/Dark Strong, and Baltic Porters.  If any of you Boston area farkers could PLEASE send me a Jack's Abbey Framinghammer  Baltic Porter aged in the Bourbon barrel I would love you so much....

How can you list all those belgian styles without the best of the lot? Sour Red Ales!
/or at least geuze.


I like sour browns. Haven't tried a sour red Belgian. Now I have a hankering for a La Follie Lips of Faith though.
 
2013-03-16 12:20:54 AM  

tedbundee: Yawn. Some day we're going to have evidence that cannabis expands consciousness. Until then, I'll continue doing my own, um, research.


I think it was Terrence McKenna who theorized that psychedelic mushrooms were what gave primitive man the spark of sentience. Though he also thought they were aliens from outer space.
 
2013-03-16 01:04:13 AM  
Step 3:  by making them stop roaming around so they could cultivate the best grains.
 
2013-03-16 01:37:34 AM  
The Ancient Egyptians were beer fanaticism uh, connoisseurs. Some cities were famous for their beer, like Memphis.  With literally brewery/pubs on every corner and middle of the block.  Rather like Starbucks in London.
 
2013-03-16 01:41:36 AM  

naughtyrev: Step 3 is encouraging people to have even more sex.


That's why God made beer. So ugly people could be fruitful and multiply.
 
2013-03-16 02:01:46 AM  
TFA completely leaves out any mention of the connections to herbal medicine, ridiculous. Sure, it would be silly to say that the effects of alcohol and the, well, socially prominent appeal factor of the activity of mass producing grains ("hey, you like that bubbly stuff, want some help planting for next time?") didn't play a major role in beer's (ale's) popularity. Thing is, hops was not the original <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gruit" target="_blank">bittering agent</a>. Beer's origin may well have been as a medicinal preparation, and alcohol has not been the only 'psychoactive' substance in it until recent times. Know your beer/ale history!

Cerebral Knievel: one is liable to come up with crazy ideas, and one of those crazy ideas was to figure out that the plants come from the seeds, and if we put the seeds in the dirt, then plants will come up and make more seeds, and since we know where they are now, we wont have to hunt around all over creation looking for the damn things.


It's a farked up tendency people have to assume people were fools blundering in a dark fog of primitive ignorance up until the invention of written language or the like. People alive a long time ago were plenty well able to come up with reasonable conclusions on their own. We're talking centuries upon millennia of forgotten history here so we'll never be sure who did what when & why, but you can bet your ass people knew plants come from seeds. Ever seen a sprout from a damn acorn? Agricultural transformation wasn't an issue of knowing how to cultivate plants, it was an issue of having a reason to do so. Appreciate most of the rest of what you've got to say.
 
2013-03-16 02:04:27 AM  
a href= [my punishment for turning off noscript and using the quote button then pasting a comment I'd composed in another tab and previewing without actually looking at the preview]
 
2013-03-16 04:04:22 AM  

fusillade762: Fear_and_Loathing: Step 3: Was it was safer than the water.

This. I can't believe TFA didn't mention that part. When you live in large cities with poor sanitation booze becomes crucial. It also explains why American Indians generally don't tolerate alcohol well.




Agreed, can't believe the article didn't mention this. It's amazing how dumb so called smart people can be.
 
2013-03-16 05:38:19 AM  
Oh how I wish there was some addon that would block all irrelevant pony posts.
 
2013-03-16 05:52:43 AM  
There is strong archeological evidence that we started brewing beer as soon as we started farming instead of hunter gathering. There is no evidence of baking bread till a couple of thousand years later.
 
2013-03-16 06:51:11 AM  

OceanVortex: The real issue is that it allowed for people to drink in cities


beer predates large cities, also way back when sanitation wasn't necessarily as bad as it was in more recent times in big cities
 
2013-03-16 07:37:39 AM  
You repeat steps one and two a few times and step three is more like stumble.
 
2013-03-16 08:21:37 AM  

Omahawg: bier ist gut

i pity the poor so-called civilizations that spurn the beer and the pork

they must lead lives of sad, desperate sobriety.


Y'know, from that perspective, all that OUTRAGE suddenly adds up.
 
2013-03-16 08:24:37 AM  

Plant Rights Activist: but that doesn't explain the irish


not much can, and even when you're spot on, then it's considered an insult and all of a sudden you're in a barfight.

Never try to psychoanalyse the irish. It always backfires.
 
2013-03-16 10:01:59 AM  
beerstreetjournal.com
i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-03-16 12:03:00 PM  
I don't see how those are ways it gave us civilization. Just reasons beer is awesome.
 
2013-03-16 03:49:39 PM  

rdyb: TFA completely leaves out any mention of the connections to herbal medicine, ridiculous. Sure, it would be silly to say that the effects of alcohol and the, well, socially prominent appeal factor of the activity of mass producing grains ("hey, you like that bubbly stuff, want some help planting for next time?") didn't play a major role in beer's (ale's) popularity. Thing is, hops was not the original <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gruit" target="_blank">bittering agent</a>. Beer's origin may well have been as a medicinal preparation, and alcohol has not been the only 'psychoactive' substance in it until recent times. Know your beer/ale history!

Cerebral Knievel: one is liable to come up with crazy ideas, and one of those crazy ideas was to figure out that the plants come from the seeds, and if we put the seeds in the dirt, then plants will come up and make more seeds, and since we know where they are now, we wont have to hunt around all over creation looking for the damn things.

It's a farked up tendency people have to assume people were fools blundering in a dark fog of primitive ignorance up until the invention of written language or the like. People alive a long time ago were plenty well able to come up with reasonable conclusions on their own. We're talking centuries upon millennia of forgotten history here so we'll never be sure who did what when & why, but you can bet your ass people knew plants come from seeds. Ever seen a sprout from a damn acorn? Agricultural transformation wasn't an issue of knowing how to cultivate plants, it was an issue of having a reason to do so. Appreciate most of the rest of what you've got to say.


It was a line from the tour I give of the brewery, meant to be soft science and "funny". Trust me, I'm well aware of the concept of Anthropological Bigotry. the line is supposed to be poking fun at the notion of a bunch of cavemen sitting around a campfire, drunk, and coming up with crazy ideas.  So that was the reason to do so...  ;) to make more of this funky happy water.
 
2013-03-16 08:32:17 PM  
I had always remembered Ben Franklin being quoted "beer is proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy".... The wife bought me a t-shirt years ago that says precisely this. Then I happened to look into it (lord knows why) and actually Franklin was writing about rain nourishing grapes and the subsequent conversion of grapes into wine.

Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine, a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy.
- Letter from BF addressed to André Morellet, 1779

I have told no one about this detail (well, except now, to you, my fark friends) because I prefer beer and prefer the quote the way I first thought it was.  And also because beer is better than wine in every conceivable way.

obviously.

Slainte!
 
2013-03-16 09:58:18 PM  

dg41: Delicious? Really?


Beer sucks.

/flame away
 
2013-03-17 12:55:42 AM  

Genju: I like almost all beers. But I LOVE Belgian Golden/Dubbel/Tripel/Quad/Dark Strong, and Baltic Porters.  If any of you Boston area farkers could PLEASE send me a Jack's Abbey Framinghammer  Baltic Porter aged in the Bourbon barrel I would love you so much....


I had a log of this at my wedding:

refugesc.com

Ablejack: /or at least geuze.


HindiDiscoMonster: Clock Spider Jerusalem: i heard the original bread yeast was created by a woman sticking her finger in her snatch & then kneading the dough. behold the goddess of the wonder bread!

I must concede the level of grossness to you my friend... that was absolutely icky.
[media.tumblr.com image 500x275]



Do you like the taste of geuze? Do you like the taste of vajayjay?  You'll love this!

www.alesunlimited.com

Ablejack: "Midas' Touch" is a beer among Dogfish Head's "Ancient Ales" series. A drinking vessel was found from the 8th century BC, about 2700 years ago. It was studied at the University of Pennsylvania. There they found that the vessel had traces of ingredients that were probably used in making beer. The University got in touch with Tom Peters of Monk's Cafe to produce a similar ale. Peters decided that Dogfish Brewery was best suited to the task and now we can have it again! tada.


They also brew a wacky Chinese beer called Chateau Jiahu that's supposedly an even older recipe.  Oh and of course, an Egyptian emmer beer, so you can get a feel for what being one of the slaves who built the pyramids might have been like.
 
2013-03-17 01:18:37 AM  

Cerebral Knievel: by the way, you can use pot in brewing, but you gotta use it as a dry hop on the secondary side to extract any THC because in the boil, there is nothing for the THC to bind to and you end up with a beer that tastes like bong water. but on the secondary side, THC is soluable in alcohol, so you will get extraction, and you will pick up some flavor of the nug but cook it off into a vegetable tasty nastiness..

or.. so I've heard...


Oh man, you absolutely must meet my friend Jon.  (Hell, if you make the rounds at the local homebrew competitions, you probably already know him.)
 
2013-03-17 02:29:33 AM  

Z-clipped: Genju: I like almost all beers. But I LOVE Belgian Golden/Dubbel/Tripel/Quad/Dark Strong, and Baltic Porters.  If any of you Boston area farkers could PLEASE send me a Jack's Abbey Framinghammer  Baltic Porter aged in the Bourbon barrel I would love you so much....

I had a log of this at my wedding:

[refugesc.com image 800x600]


OMG! A tripel aged in bourbon? How did that even taste? Tripels tend to have a spice to them. Mixed with a bourbon aftertaste no doubt. Interesting. I've had my fair share of bourbon and scotched aged beers, but only one scotch aged Belgian dark strong. I'm surprised it's only 11%. Most regular Tripels and goldens hover around 9-11%. My goto regularly available 11%-er is a Gulden Draak.
 
2013-03-17 03:51:30 AM  

Genju: Z-clipped: Genju: I like almost all beers. But I LOVE Belgian Golden/Dubbel/Tripel/Quad/Dark Strong, and Baltic Porters.  If any of you Boston area farkers could PLEASE send me a Jack's Abbey Framinghammer  Baltic Porter aged in the Bourbon barrel I would love you so much....

I had a log of this at my wedding:

[refugesc.com image 800x600]

OMG! A tripel aged in bourbon? How did that even taste? Tripels tend to have a spice to them. Mixed with a bourbon aftertaste no doubt. Interesting. I've had my fair share of bourbon and scotched aged beers, but only one scotch aged Belgian dark strong. I'm surprised it's only 11%. Most regular Tripels and goldens hover around 9-11%. My goto regularly available 11%-er is a Gulden Draak.


It's amazing!  They use Jim Beam barrels. The regular Allagash tripel comes in at 10%, so I can only assume it picks up a little alcohol in the barrel, either from secondary fermentation, (or maybe just osmosis).  It takes a lot of creaminess and vanilla from the oak, but hangs onto the fruit and citrus.  There's just enough hop bitterness to perfectly balance the malt and bourbon sweetness.  One of my top 5 favorite beers.

If you like that heavy boozy banana and spice in Gulden Draak (which is also a world-class beer IMO), you'll LOVE this.  Check the draft list at the Publick House... they might have it on tap right now.
 
2013-03-17 05:59:40 PM  

lewismarktwo: Oh how I wish there was some addon that would block all irrelevant pony posts.


blogs.sfweekly.com
 
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