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(TreeHugger)   "Want to make a skyscraper look trendy and sustainable? Put a tree on it"   (treehugger.com) divider line 5
    More: Obvious  
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5146 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Mar 2013 at 10:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-03-15 10:50:45 AM  
2 votes:
Oh, and its also not exactly a new idea

www.turismo.intoscana.it

Torre Guinigi, Lucca (Italy)
2013-03-15 11:38:54 AM  
1 votes:
They do know about vegetated roofs right?  still waiting for a LEED project where I get to do one.
2013-03-15 10:45:19 AM  
1 votes:
Happy Hours:Trees can certainly survive growing that many feet above sea level.

Sure. The air pressure isn't a problem.

It's the wind - and that tends to go hand in hand with being 2700 feet above the GROUND, wherever that ground may be.
2013-03-15 10:37:45 AM  
1 votes:
First, most of those renderings are BS anyway. They are for marketing, not construction. Most of the stuff like that isnt removed from the project because its not possible, but it gets VE'd out because the developer doesnt want to spend a dime on something he cant lease out.

Remember when the WTC #1 was going to have a  "Vertical Gardens of the World" component where each set of floors would be a different climatic region of the world.

assets.inhabitat.com


and instead we end up with yet another glass shoebox because "OMG rentable space!"


Secondly, "Life for city trees is hard enough on the ground. I can't imagine what it's like at 500 feet, where nearly every climate variable is more extreme than at street level. "

Everybody knows trees can exist at 501 feet or if the weather is a bit extreme

watermarked.cutcaster.com
2013-03-15 08:48:10 AM  
1 votes:
FTA: There are plenty of scientific reasons why skyscrapers don't-and probably won't-have trees, at least not to the heights which many architects propose. Life sucks up there. For you, for me, for trees, and just about everything else except peregrine falcons. It's hot, cold, windy, the rain lashes at you, and the snow and sleet pelt you at high velocity. Life for city trees is hard enough on the ground. I can't imagine what it's like at 500 feet, where nearly every climate variable is more extreme than at street level.

So what they're saying is that a REALLY, REALLY, REALLY tall skyscraper might have a treeline?

The Googles tells me the tallest building is 2,722 feet tall.

Trees can certainly survive growing that many feet above sea level.
 
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