If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   Mirror journalists held over hacking gnikcah revo dleh stsilanruoj rorriM   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 10
    More: Followup, Sunday Mirror, Operation Weeting  
•       •       •

1309 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Mar 2013 at 8:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



10 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-03-14 07:28:04 AM
Where?  In Notlob?
 
2013-03-14 07:29:43 AM
Why do those numb nuts keep calling it hacking?  Those buttholes just guessed on the passwords based on readily/public information that their targets were stupid enough to use for their passwords.
 
2013-03-14 07:32:02 AM
liberalvaluesblog.com
 
2013-03-14 07:50:51 AM
Obligatory:

imgs.xkcd.com

/Hot
 
2013-03-14 08:44:34 AM

FullMetalPanda: Why do those numb nuts keep calling it hacking?  Those buttholes just guessed on the passwords based on readily/public information that their targets were stupid enough to use for their passwords.


That is still hacking. Crap hacking, but hacking nonetheless. Gaining access to a computer system illegally is still illegal no matter how easy the password is to guess.
 
2013-03-14 08:50:19 AM

FullMetalPanda: Why do those numb nuts keep calling it hacking?  Those buttholes just guessed on the passwords based on readily/public information that their targets were stupid enough to use for their passwords.


technically speaking accessing any system that you don't have permission to be on is hacking. Gripe all you want about it being low level BS and them using social engineering to gain access, but they are still technically correct.

\the best kind of correct.
 
2013-03-14 08:50:56 AM
damnit,.. I took way to long to type my response.
 
2013-03-14 08:58:20 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: damnit,.. I took way to long to type my response.


Maybe Xria hacked your account delaying?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-14 09:27:35 AM
Police launched Operation Weeting in 2011. The investigation is running alongside Operation Elveden, a probe into illegal payments to public officials, and Operation Tuleta, which is an looking at computer hacking and other privacy breaches.

Who comes up with these names?

I'm serious. In America we have PR code names like "Desert Storm" and "Enduring Freedom" that the people responsible make up. We also have secret code names where you ask the code name generation department for a random word that has been screened by lawyers and counterintelligence experts. The British names are too silly for the first kind and shouldn't have been revealed if they are the second kind.
 
2013-03-14 11:00:24 AM

ZAZ: Police launched Operation Weeting in 2011. The investigation is running alongside Operation Elveden, a probe into illegal payments to public officials, and Operation Tuleta, which is an looking at computer hacking and other privacy breaches.

Who comes up with these names?

I'm serious. In America we have PR code names like "Desert Storm" and "Enduring Freedom" that the people responsible make up. We also have secret code names where you ask the code name generation department for a random word that has been screened by lawyers and counterintelligence experts. The British names are too silly for the first kind and shouldn't have been revealed if they are the second kind.


Yeah, well, they've kind of gone downhill since this advice from Winston Churchill in 1943:

"Operations in which large numbers of men may lose their lives ought not to be decided by code-words that imply a boastful and over-confident sentiment, such as 'Triumphant,' or conversely, which are calculated to invest the plan with an air of despondency, such as 'Woebetide' and 'Flimsy.' They ought not to be names of a frivolous character, such as 'Bunnyhug' and 'Ballyhoo.' They should not be ordinary words often used in other connections, such as 'Flood,' 'Sudden,' and 'Supreme.' Names of living people‹ministers or commanders‹should be avoided. Intelligent thought will already supply an unlimited number of well-sounding names that do not suggest the character of the operation or disparage it in any way and do not enable some widow or mother to say that her son was killed in an operation called 'Bunnyhug' or 'Ballyhoo.' Proper names are good in this field. The heroes of antiquity, figures from Greek and Roman mythology, the constellations and stars, famous racehorses, names of British and American war heroes, could be used, provided they fall within the rules above."

There are only so many possibilities, and if you follow the rules, eventually you'll end up pulling out ones that only have significance to people who have every version of Advanced D&D.
 
Displayed 10 of 10 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report