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(Fox News)   Musical instruments will now be required to have passports to travel. Drummers and bassists can still be shipped with normal cargo   (foxnews.com) divider line 33
    More: Interesting, passports, endangered animals  
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4741 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Mar 2013 at 8:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-14 07:28:05 AM
Musicians who have instruments made from endangered animals, like pianos made with ivory keys or violin bows crafted from tortoise shell, could find international travel a bit easier, thanks to new trade rules that will require a passport for their instruments.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) agreed to a multi-entry system based on a U.S. proposal to issue passports good for three years, the U.K.'s

Prior to this, musicians needed a new permit for each time they traveled and were forced to do such drastic things as remove all the ivory from the piano in order to transport the instrument.

"This is monumental because it facilitates movement of musicians, particularly orchestras," Bryan Arroyo, head of the U.S. trade delegation that proposed the scheme told the Telegraph.

A British expert, who wished to remain anonymous, told the AFP: "No one wants to harm elephants but it seems a little ridiculous to have to apply for a CITES (permit) for a 120-year old piano."


WTF, tortoise shells?  How the fark do you make a bow from a shell?  Must be a farking big shell!
 
2013-03-14 07:44:31 AM
I'll admit that the headline (& their phrasing - passport?) had me scratching my head but it sounds like a good common sense program (wow, common sense from various government bodies.  Who'da thunk it).  Is there anything other than humans that are issued passports?  It just seems odd that they would call it that rather than say a permit or license.

Regardless, I'm sure that it's better for the instruments not to be stripped down & reassembled every time they need to cross a line on a map (people too for that matter but the security theater argument is for a different thread...).
 
2013-03-14 08:08:25 AM
what about neil peart
does he get 2 seats cause he's so fat
 
2013-03-14 08:31:36 AM

FullMetalPanda: WTF, tortoise shells?  How the fark do you make a bow from a shell?  Must be a farking big shell!


Some tortoises grow to be quite large.

rookery.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-03-14 08:33:05 AM

FullMetalPanda: WTF, tortoise shells?  How the fark do you make a bow from a shell?  Must be a farking big shell!


The bow isn't tortoise shell, the frog on the bow is.
www.wangbow.com
The frog is the part with the circle on it.
 
2013-03-14 08:33:45 AM

Gordon Bennett: FullMetalPanda: WTF, tortoise shells?  How the fark do you make a bow from a shell?  Must be a farking big shell!

Some tortoises grow to be quite large.

[rookery.s3.amazonaws.com image 624x530]


I feel like I should have been the one to make that joke.
 
2013-03-14 08:35:42 AM
This is a great idea... those of us with ivory mouthpieces have a hard time traveling, or have to use substandard equipment when traveling.  This'll fix that.
 
2013-03-14 08:47:05 AM
Yes but will the TSA still be required to destroy the instruments after they are checked?
 
2013-03-14 08:47:51 AM

Recoil Therapy: I'll admit that the headline (& their phrasing - passport?) had me scratching my head but it sounds like a good common sense program (wow, common sense from various government bodies.  Who'da thunk it).  Is there anything other than humans that are issued passports?  It just seems odd that they would call it that rather than say a permit or license.

Regardless, I'm sure that it's better for the instruments not to be stripped down & reassembled every time they need to cross a line on a map (people too for that matter but the security theater argument is for a different thread...).


Frequently museum exhibitions that travel internationally have a passport or a passport like document associated with them.  I can't remember what the exact document name is, but they are especially important for exibits that include controlled materials that are not normally easy to take across borders.
 
2013-03-14 08:48:26 AM

GORDON: Yes but will the TSA still be required to destroy the instruments after they are checked?


Assuming the airlines don't beat them to it.
 
2013-03-14 08:51:30 AM
Oh great. Like the orchestra nutters didn't anthropomorphize their instruments enough...

/hold me
//fermata, I am
 
2013-03-14 08:58:47 AM
The irony here is some American made guitars are built using rare woods, and are then exported. So people in other countries who bought an American guitar and want to travel to the USA, need a passport for their guitar.
 
2013-03-14 09:04:27 AM
This is good news for me and my banjo with a rare bridge made from ikea-grade pulp board.
 
2013-03-14 09:07:27 AM
WTF, a piano? Portable instruments, yeah, but you can find a Steinway anywhere.
 
2013-03-14 09:40:00 AM

verbaltoxin: The irony here is some American made guitars are built using rare woods, and are then exported. So people in other countries who bought an American guitar and want to travel to the USA, need a passport for their guitar.


It's not for immigration, it's so that they know you didn't harvest their rare 3,000 year old yews to make it. You'd need the same passport every time you crossed any international border with the instrument.
 
2013-03-14 09:43:11 AM
Seems like it would be easier to travel with a piano with wood keys and wood/metal/plastic violin bows.  It's not like ivory keys and tortoise shell bows make any difference in the sound.
 
2013-03-14 09:55:33 AM

Rincewind53: The bow isn't tortoise shell, the frog on the bow is.


Frogs made out of tortoises?

Sounds like a masterful piece of genetic engineering
 
2013-03-14 09:58:01 AM

Speaker2Animals: WTF, a piano? Portable instruments, yeah, but you can find a Steinway anywhere.


You can find a century-plus-old, top-quality, top-condition grand piano anywhere in the world?  That someone will let you use?  You must have terrific connections everywhere in the world!
 
2013-03-14 09:58:50 AM

verbaltoxin: The irony here is some American made guitars are built using rare woods, and are then exported. So people in other countries who bought an American guitar and want to travel to the USA, need a passport for their guitar.


Worse, the rare imported wood may have been imported illegally, even when you're buying from a top shelf dealer

This is why I only buy First Act guitars from WalMart.  No worries about rare imported woods.  Or wood at all, for that matter.  Kind of like pasteurized processed cheese food.
 
2013-03-14 10:41:16 AM
Glockenspiel Hero
Worse, the rare imported wood may have been imported illegally, even when you're buying from a top shelf dealer

Why is is that Gibson got hammered while Martin, who uses the same wood from the same source, didn't?

Ludwig,Zildjian & Remo,none of that furriner stuff for me ;)

/actually like Pearls too
//Tama's gone downhill
 
2013-03-14 10:44:05 AM

Happy Hours: Rincewind53: The bow isn't tortoise shell, the frog on the bow is.

Frogs made out of tortoises?

Sounds like a masterful piece of genetic engineering


no, just intelligent design.
 
2013-03-14 10:59:47 AM

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: Seems like it would be easier to travel with a piano with wood keys and wood/metal/plastic violin bows.  It's not like ivory keys and tortoise shell bows make any difference in the sound.


The ivory itself may not make a difference to the sound, but the ivory (or whatever) tends to be attached to a high quality instrument, and changing out the ivory parts is a huge pain and expense, and an opportunity for accidents that will affect the sound.
 
2013-03-14 11:35:17 AM
Dammit. I could carry my 1911 String Ensemble with me everywhere, now this shiat ...

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-14 12:40:35 PM

GORDON: Yes but will the TSA still be required to destroy the instruments after they are checked?


I thought that the actual destruction of the instruments was still done by the private sector, i.e., airline baggage handlers.
 
2013-03-14 01:39:09 PM

Glockenspiel Hero: This is why I only buy First Act guitars from WalMart.  No worries about rare imported woods.  Or wood at all, for that matter.  Kind of like pasteurized processed cheese food.


God, I hate it when one of those, or a Rogue brand instrument walks in the shop, but the worst are those "Maestro, by Gibson" 50 dollar guitars, they are the pressboard coffee tables of the guitar world.


/Gibson should lynch the bean counter that thought allowing their name to be even remotely associated with those things was a good idea
//Rogues are not really that bad, other than being laminates with floor joists masquerading as tone bars and poly finishes applied with a trowel....
 
2013-03-14 01:55:51 PM

FullMetalPanda: Musicians who have instruments made from endangered animals, like pianos made with ivory keys or violin bows crafted from tortoise shell, could find international travel a bit easier, thanks to new trade rules that will require a passport for their instruments.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) agreed to a multi-entry system based on a U.S. proposal to issue passports good for three years, the U.K.'s

Prior to this, musicians needed a new permit for each time they traveled and were forced to do such drastic things as remove all the ivory from the piano in order to transport the instrument.

"This is monumental because it facilitates movement of musicians, particularly orchestras," Bryan Arroyo, head of the U.S. trade delegation that proposed the scheme told the Telegraph.

A British expert, who wished to remain anonymous, told the AFP: "No one wants to harm elephants but it seems a little ridiculous to have to apply for a CITES (permit) for a 120-year old piano."


WTF, tortoise shells?  How the fark do you make a bow from a shell?  Must be a farking big shell!


It's not the whole bow--more a small part of the frog (the part of the bow nearest where you'd hold it with your hand) which in antique bows was inlaid with tortoiseshell (usually either the "dot" in the frog or the lower inlay which helps secure the horsehair in a bow).  Nowadays they use plastic, but antique bows do use tortoiseshell (which throws them under CITES regs).
 
2013-03-14 03:04:02 PM
Imagine all the cute passport photos!
 
2013-03-14 03:07:43 PM

ukexpat: Imagine all the cute passport photos!


My passport photo is the single-greatest photo ever taken of me. It's such a damn shame that I can't use it outside of the customs window.
 
2013-03-14 03:49:14 PM

ArtosRC: ukexpat: Imagine all the cute passport photos!

My passport photo is the single-greatest photo ever taken of me. It's such a damn shame that I can't use it outside of the customs window.


Can't you scan it?
 
2013-03-14 03:49:39 PM

factoryconnection: Speaker2Animals: WTF, a piano? Portable instruments, yeah, but you can find a Steinway anywhere.

You can find a century-plus-old, top-quality, top-condition grand piano anywhere in the world?  That someone will let you use?  You must have terrific connections everywhere in the world!


But disassembling it, packing it, shipping it and reassembling it with no loss of tonal quality or structural integrity would be easier? If you're a top quality concert pianist you'll have access to a top-shelf Steinway wherever you perform; they don't typically book appearances at the local sports bar. For recreation? There are five college music schools within an hour's drive of me where you can have access to rehearsal rooms where they are not always in use by students.
 
2013-03-14 05:35:22 PM

pciszek: GORDON: Yes but will the TSA still be required to destroy the instruments after they are checked?

I thought that the actual destruction of the instruments was still done by the private sector, i.e., airline baggage handlers.


Some famous concert pianist supposedly had his piano destroyed by the TSA because the glue smelled like explosives to them. I can't remember all the details, but before he finished a concert (in LA, I think) he stood up and went into a tirade and swore never to come back to the US.
 
2013-03-14 08:08:17 PM

Happy Hours: pciszek: GORDON: Yes but will the TSA still be required to destroy the instruments after they are checked?

I thought that the actual destruction of the instruments was still done by the private sector, i.e., airline baggage handlers.

Some famous concert pianist supposedly had his piano destroyed by the TSA because the glue smelled like explosives to them. I can't remember all the details, but before he finished a concert (in LA, I think) he stood up and went into a tirade and swore never to come back to the US.


Yes, at Disney Concert Hall in LA.  He was probably really, really upset.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krystian_Zimerman#Criticism_of_US_polic y
 
2013-03-15 10:24:25 AM

ukexpat: Can't you scan it?


Fairly certain that it's against some law somewhere to use it in that regard. Not one to test it out.
 
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