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(The Verge)   Google set to merge Android with ChromeOS to beat Ballmer at his own game: Destroying Microsoft   (theverge.com) divider line 54
    More: Interesting, Chrome OS, Ballmer, Android, Microsoft, Google, operating systems, Andy Rubin, cartels  
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2939 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Mar 2013 at 10:08 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-14 06:24:16 AM
ChromeOS + Android

Chromedroid??

If I am not mistaken, I believe all this has happened before....

www.macmeisters.com
 
2013-03-14 09:38:16 AM
If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.
Maybe Microsoft's big plan was actually to do something colossally stupid but trick Google into emulating them.
 
2013-03-14 09:55:25 AM
Hmm. Does your business run on:
1) Facebook
2) Win32 applications for which the developer was fired years ago but still drive 100% of your revenue

1) You do not have a business; you are a teenage girl.
2) Sorry, there is no OS which supports you.  It used to be Windows; now it's not.

Dear Microsoft:  It's not the UI, it's the applications. Remember sweatily jumping around shouting 'developers developers developers'?  Don't abandon their API set, you morons.
 
2013-03-14 10:23:09 AM

serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.


The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.
 
2013-03-14 10:35:38 AM

meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.


Right Click: All Programs. Brilliant!!
 
2013-03-14 10:50:30 AM

meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.


This.  My wife thinks exactly that and wouldn't even think about upgrading because of this.
 
2013-03-14 10:54:07 AM

steve_wmn: meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.

This.  My wife thinks exactly that and wouldn't even think about upgrading because of this.


Windows 8 suffers from Mass Hysteria. I've used it for a few months now, and some of my coworkers are coming on board. The first question after they settle in is "what was supposed to be so bad?"

Anecdotes are anecdotes, of course, but Win 8 takes too much unearned criticism.
 
2013-03-14 10:55:57 AM

meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.


Not that it's the entire OS, but it's a giant pock mark on it.  In terms of performance and stability it's a big improvement over 7, but metro just destroyed the usability side of things.
 
2013-03-14 11:01:51 AM
Is this actually a surprise to anyone? I assumed that this was the long term plan as soon as I heard of ChromeOS.

And the author of the article claims that everyone is surprised at how successful Android has turned out to be. WTF?

This guy should not be a tech writer if these are all shocking revelations to him.
 
2013-03-14 11:10:54 AM
Cool speculation, Dieter.  Where's the evidence?
 
2013-03-14 11:19:24 AM
The saddest thing is the people who believe -- in their heart-of-hearts -- that the existence of a good, "competing" O/S is gonna take Microsoft's long-time 90%+ desktop market share to pound town.

/the mobile market was fairly new/open and was a relative cinch to compete in
//desktop market? errr. good luck with that. ms is as entrenched as the defense industry
///well, ok, unless you change ip and patent law so you can freely incorporate a ton of ms' source. that'd work.
//please show us this magical stick of yours! i want to play with magic stick and summon bunnies into top hats
/*this is what happens when you let monopolies form; always break em up before they turn into behemoths*
 
2013-03-14 11:31:20 AM

poot_rootbeer: Cool speculation, Dieter.  Where's the evidence?


One guy being in charge of both projects? And this from a couple of months ago while not hard evidence (which you only get once it is announced) is a good indication of where google might be headed.

How they go about combining them is an interesting question.  Can ChromeOS run the Dalvik virtual machine like BB10 or other Alien Dalvik implementations across other platforms -or- Will ChromeOS come fully featured as an Android app of sorts because at its core it is just a web browser.

They could go a third way and combine both into a single new product but that might endanger the small niche Chromebooks have dug out for themselves and it could be the tipping point that sees Samsung fork Android like Amazon already have.
 
2013-03-14 11:38:55 AM

LasersHurt: steve_wmn: meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.

This.  My wife thinks exactly that and wouldn't even think about upgrading because of this.

Windows 8 suffers from Mass Hysteria. I've used it for a few months now, and some of my coworkers are coming on board. The first question after they settle in is "what was supposed to be so bad?"

Anecdotes are anecdotes, of course, but Win 8 takes too much unearned criticism.


Same exact thing happened to Vista. There was nothing wrong with it, yet for some reason the media decided it was horrible.

The best part was when Windows 7 came out and everyone said it was awesome, the cognitive dissonance on sites like Slashdot was amazing. Every single "People actually like Windows 7!" article was followed up by a thousand comments of "I don't see why people are making such a big deal about this, it's EXACTLY the same as Vista!".


I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.
 
2013-03-14 11:48:40 AM

serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.
Maybe Microsoft's big plan was actually to do something colossally stupid but trick Google into emulating them.


I'd say more specifically that mobile and desktop UIs should not be combined.  If you can create an OS that works on both types of UI, then go for it.
 
2013-03-14 12:03:08 PM
Win 8 is fine. Speedy and stable. The metro view is a pox and should be nuked from orbit.
 
2013-03-14 12:03:57 PM
You should never use a new OS, especially Windows, until the first service pack comes out.

/Waiting for Windows 8 SP1 before I buy it.
 
2013-03-14 12:07:04 PM
I'm on record here liking 8, including Metro.  Metro's great for lazy Sunday mornings when you just want to goof off, particularly the formatting for news stories.  Love it.

HOWEVER! I was very surprised to learn that Google had discontinued its sync abilities with MS for non-Apps accounts.  I can't sync my calendar or contacts or email to the Metro app, wiping out what I thought was the slamdunk for making Metro exactly what I wanted.  I used the Sync utility at work until they discontinued last fall, I didn't realize it was for all aspects of syncing.  That level of throwdown between Google and MS told me that something was coming up.

Mom, Dad, stop fighting!  Don't make me choose!  I love you both!
 
2013-03-14 12:19:05 PM

JohnBigBootay: Win 8 is fine. Speedy and stable. The metro view is a pox and should be nuked from orbit.


Metro is the 1st step in unifying mobile and desktop. Same as Chrome/Android, and OS X / iOS. But you have to give the vendors a common platform to build apps on FIRST.

People have been biatching about Windows legacy code for years, but it has always been there for backwards compatibility. Guess what? Microsoft wants out of supporting that legacy code as bad as everyone else. Why is this so hard to understand?
 
2013-03-14 12:31:50 PM

TelemonianAjax: I'm on record here liking 8, including Metro.  Metro's great for lazy Sunday mornings when you just want to goof off, particularly the formatting for news stories.  Love it.

HOWEVER! I was very surprised to learn that Google had discontinued its sync abilities with MS for non-Apps accounts.  I can't sync my calendar or contacts or email to the Metro app, wiping out what I thought was the slamdunk for making Metro exactly what I wanted.  I used the Sync utility at work until they discontinued last fall, I didn't realize it was for all aspects of syncing.  That level of throwdown between Google and MS told me that something was coming up.

Mom, Dad, stop fighting!  Don't make me choose!  I love you both!


Yeah, Google wants free users to use CalDAV, CardDAV, and IMAP to sync those. Neither Outlook now WIndows Mail support Card/CalDAV, but it looks like Windows Phone 8 will be getting support.

After they pulled that I moved my primary address to a hosted Exchange account through Comcast business. I have to put up with IMAP BS enough through work, I'm not going to dick with it on my personal accounts too.
 
2013-03-14 12:37:16 PM
Just 5 minutes ago, I discovered that NO metro apps run with UAC disabled... Good times...

Wouldn't normally run with UAC disabled, but my work IA is stupid and mandates it for some dumb reason.
 
2013-03-14 12:37:57 PM

MightyPez: TelemonianAjax: I'm on record here liking 8, including Metro.  Metro's great for lazy Sunday mornings when you just want to goof off, particularly the formatting for news stories.  Love it.

HOWEVER! I was very surprised to learn that Google had discontinued its sync abilities with MS for non-Apps accounts.  I can't sync my calendar or contacts or email to the Metro app, wiping out what I thought was the slamdunk for making Metro exactly what I wanted.  I used the Sync utility at work until they discontinued last fall, I didn't realize it was for all aspects of syncing.  That level of throwdown between Google and MS told me that something was coming up.

Mom, Dad, stop fighting!  Don't make me choose!  I love you both!

Yeah, Google wants free users to use CalDAV, CardDAV, and IMAP to sync those. Neither Outlook now WIndows Mail support Card/CalDAV, but it looks like Windows Phone 8 will be getting support.

After they pulled that I moved my primary address to a hosted Exchange account through Comcast business. I have to put up with IMAP BS enough through work, I'm not going to dick with it on my personal accounts too.


It's her laptop with Win8, so I was just fiddling on my own user account to get a feel.  I'm planning a whole house system in the next six months and wanted to know if 8 would be a better base for it than 7, and I think I'm going to stick with 7, as I don't have a single complaint about it right now.
 
2013-03-14 12:48:53 PM
Who cares? They killed Reader. On the day before my freakin' birthday! They're dead to me! Dead I say.

/ Who am I kidding... I can't quit Google, no matter how much they hurt me.
 
2013-03-14 12:52:52 PM
Holy crap, the shills are out in force today.
 
2013-03-14 12:58:39 PM

serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.
Maybe Microsoft's big plan was actually to do something colossally stupid but trick Google into emulating them.


Nah. The OSes can be intelligently combined. Microsoft's biggest problem was forcing all users (including users of desktops/laptops) right into Metro instead of the standard desktop. Metro isn't great when you have a mouse and a keyboard right there (especially with no touchscreen).

Just make one OS, with different appearances based on the type of machine someone is on. Phones, tablets, desktops, laptops.... they all have different things a person is looking for in an UI. It would be relatively easy for Microsoft to keep the guts of Windows 8 the same across the board, but make it look different based on the machine. In fact, that would have been the smart way to do it.
 
2013-03-14 01:11:47 PM

MithrandirBooga: LasersHurt: steve_wmn: meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.

This.  My wife thinks exactly that and wouldn't even think about upgrading because of this.

Windows 8 suffers from Mass Hysteria. I've used it for a few months now, and some of my coworkers are coming on board. The first question after they settle in is "what was supposed to be so bad?"

Anecdotes are anecdotes, of course, but Win 8 takes too much unearned criticism.

Same exact thing happened to Vista. There was nothing wrong with it, yet for some reason the media decided it was horrible.

The best part was when Windows 7 came out and everyone said it was awesome, the cognitive dissonance on sites like Slashdot was amazing. Every single "People actually like Windows 7!" article was followed up by a thousand comments of "I don't see why people are making such a big deal about this, it's EXACTLY the same as Vista!".


I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.


That can be MS's new marketing campaign.

"CONSUMERS ARE STUPID/WRONG"

/Also, ignore our stock price
 
2013-03-14 01:24:32 PM

MithrandirBooga: I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.


You do realize that under the previous start men, that frequently-used programs were right there when you clicked start, and not, in fact, buried in "10,000 start menu icons' as you claim, right?
 
2013-03-14 01:33:58 PM

Carousel Beast: MithrandirBooga: I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.

You do realize that under the previous start men, that frequently-used programs were right there when you clicked start, and not, in fact, buried in "10,000 start menu icons' as you claim, right?


They also are limited in space and if I use one program over another, the programs are replaced. Though I have no issue using Windows 7 and have yet to use 8. Looking forward to the day I get to play with 8. Only bad part is, most of my games are XP. So no upgrading for me till I duel boot my computer. Saving up for said upgrade.
 
2013-03-14 01:41:46 PM

gameshowhost: well, ok, unless you change ip and patent law so you can freely incorporate a ton of ms' source. that'd work.


The Oracle-Google lawsuit cemented into US case law the notion that you cannot copyright an API.  So derivative products are free to incorporate the same API into their own products, as long as the code that executes behind the API call is different.  This can go for as to allow an emulated OS; as example, Coherent is a clone of AT&T Version 7 Unix, ReactOS is a clone of Windows 2000.
 
2013-03-14 01:45:05 PM
The people who write these articles have never been out into the real world where legacy software rules the world at most companies.

Companies rather continue to run Windows XP so they can keep using some custom written program written 10 years ago rather than upgrade everything. Hell, I work with a telemarketing company that still uses DOS and all of their computer monitors are 13" monochrome tubes -- their call center is like a flashback to the 1980s. They've had to make so few changes to their software that they've never had much of a reason to modernize their system.
 
2013-03-14 01:49:32 PM

serial_crusher: meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.

Not that it's the entire OS, but it's a giant pock mark on it.  In terms of performance and stability it's a big improvement over 7, but metro just destroyed the usability side of things.


Since we're off topic -- there's a $5 add-on you can use if you want the old Start Menu back.  I actually prefer the Metro one but I really only use like six or seven applications regularly and I just tack them to my taskbar.  Honestly, I so rarely go into the Metro interface.
 
2013-03-14 01:50:49 PM

MithrandirBooga: I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7"


One thing to remember is that a lot of people moved from XP to 8.
Or they moved from XP to 7, but still used 7 the same way they used XP.  That transition was easy, because 7 didn't really take anything away from the UI, so didn't force you to learn anything new.

I remember when XP came out, and was the "fisher price" windows.  I hated the new start menu they introduced then, but you could revert it back to the windows 95 version.  Then when I upgraded to 7 I was annoyed that I couldn't still revert it, then I realized it was kind of better.
 Hell, when I moved from 3.1 to 95 I actually (very briefly) tried to override the Explorer shell with the old school Program Manager.  They included a seriously bastardized version of it for whatever reason.  Not a good idea to actually try and use it though.
Aversion to change is a real thing
 

My biggest gripe about Windows 8 is the number of gestures etc that aren't intuitive and have no visual cues.  All kinds of stuff you activate by hovering your mouse in magic areas, etc.  Close a metro app by clicking top middle of the screen and dragging down?  There's no visual indicator for that.  Compared to the old style, there was a button with an X.  Even if you had never used that UI before and didn't know what that button does, you still know that it's there and can be reasonably sure that it does something, so trial and error your way to a solution.  Finding magic invisible hot spots takes several more trials and errors.
 
2013-03-14 01:51:18 PM

meanmutton: I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.


Not marketing. You can't market something people don't want. Give people what they want and give them options to try new things. Don't force it down their throat.

shiat on your customer base at your own peril.
 
2013-03-14 01:59:59 PM

TelemonianAjax: It's her laptop with Win8, so I was just fiddling on my own user account to get a feel.  I'm planning a whole house system in the next six months and wanted to know if 8 would be a better base for it than 7, and I think I'm going to stick with 7, as I don't have a single complaint about it right now.


There's no need to push for Windows 8 over Windows 7, but it is much faster on things like boot-up and shut-down unless you have touch-screen capable machines.  Even without the Metro interface, the desktop interface with the touchscreen works quite nicely.
 
2013-03-14 02:00:53 PM

Moopy Mac: MithrandirBooga: LasersHurt: steve_wmn: meanmutton: serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.

The lesson they should take away is "don't be terrible at marketing".  I mean, the marketing for Windows 8 was so bad that people think that the new glorified start menu is the entire OS.

This.  My wife thinks exactly that and wouldn't even think about upgrading because of this.

Windows 8 suffers from Mass Hysteria. I've used it for a few months now, and some of my coworkers are coming on board. The first question after they settle in is "what was supposed to be so bad?"

Anecdotes are anecdotes, of course, but Win 8 takes too much unearned criticism.

Same exact thing happened to Vista. There was nothing wrong with it, yet for some reason the media decided it was horrible.

The best part was when Windows 7 came out and everyone said it was awesome, the cognitive dissonance on sites like Slashdot was amazing. Every single "People actually like Windows 7!" article was followed up by a thousand comments of "I don't see why people are making such a big deal about this, it's EXACTLY the same as Vista!".


I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.

That can be MS's new marketing campaign.

"CONSUMERS UNINFORMED INTERNET COMMENTERS ARE STUPID/WRONG"

/Also, ignore our stock price

 
2013-03-14 02:03:12 PM

yves0010: Carousel Beast: MithrandirBooga: I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.

You do realize that under the previous start men, that frequently-used programs were right there when you clicked start, and not, in fact, buried in "10,000 start menu icons' as you claim, right?

They also are limited in space and if I use one program over another, the programs are replaced. Though I have no issue using Windows 7 and have yet to use 8. Looking forward to the day I get to play with 8. Only bad part is, most of my games are XP. So no upgrading for me till I duel boot my computer. Saving up for said upgrade.


Any of the old-school games I've tried on Windows 8 worked just fine, even the ones which wouldn't run on Windows 7.
 
2013-03-14 02:23:38 PM

meanmutton: Any of the old-school games I've tried on Windows 8 worked just fine, even the ones which wouldn't run on Windows 7.


I put my 8yr old on w8 for a few months, all of his apps "worked" but many of them wouldn't run on his restricted account without me having to type in my password each time.  I gave up a few weeks ago and put him back on w7.  The parental controls are actually better in w8, but the house is much quieter now :)
 
2013-03-14 02:40:11 PM

meanmutton: Any of the old-school games I've tried on Windows 8 worked just fine, even the ones which wouldn't run on Windows 7.


I really haven't run into many old games that refuse to work under Windows 7 x86.  Most of my troubles are when I try to use them under the x86-64 edition since it lacks a Win16 subsystem.  A lot of old games used a 16-bit installer.

On a positive note, there were a few more modern games that choked on Windows XP x86-64 edition that worked fine on Windows 7 x86-64.  Caesar IV was one I recall offhand.
 
2013-03-14 03:08:09 PM
MithrandirBooga:

Same exact thing happened to Vista. There was nothing wrong with it, yet for some reason the media decided it was horrible.

The best part was when Windows 7 came out and everyone said it was awesome, the cognitive dissonance on sites like Slashdot was amazing. Every single "People actually like Windows 7!" article was followed up by a thousand comments of "I don't see why people are making such a big deal about this, it's EXACTLY the same as Vista!".


I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.


There were people who had legitimate problems with Vista, but it mostly wasn't the fault of the operating system itself. Third party drivers caused most of the BSODs, and some systems that shipped with it didn't meet the minimum requirements (or just barely). I don't recall if the latter was MS's fault or the PC maker's, but either way it wasn't Vista. I remember I was cautious with trying it at first, but I found it to be perfectly stable and was a nice upgrade from XP, which was showing it's age at that point. Win7 was practically a service pack.
 
2013-03-14 03:37:27 PM

pyrotek85: There were people who had legitimate problems with Vista, but it mostly wasn't the fault of the operating system itself. Third party drivers caused most of the BSODs, and some systems that shipped with it didn't meet the minimum requirements (or just barely). I don't recall if the latter was MS's fault or the PC maker's, but either way it wasn't Vista. I remember I was cautious with trying it at first, but I found it to be perfectly stable and was a nice upgrade from XP, which was showing it's age at that point. Win7 was practically a service pack.


this, I had 2 machines with Vista, the first was a Dell Laptop, when I bought it, I re-formatted the machine, re-installed Just the OS and the programs I wanted on it, and did not have a hitch until the screen started to die like 3-4 years later.
 
2013-03-14 03:55:09 PM

Dinjiin: meanmutton: Any of the old-school games I've tried on Windows 8 worked just fine, even the ones which wouldn't run on Windows 7.

I really haven't run into many old games that refuse to work under Windows 7 x86.  Most of my troubles are when I try to use them under the x86-64 edition since it lacks a Win16 subsystem.  A lot of old games used a 16-bit installer.

On a positive note, there were a few more modern games that choked on Windows XP x86-64 edition that worked fine on Windows 7 x86-64.  Caesar IV was one I recall offhand.


What about the old build engine based games.

Because i have a foundness/weakness for forcing Redneck Rampage on all platforms.

Of course, im still rolling XP on all my window boxes, and even they are usually dual booting with some flavor of Linux.

Oh! I just remembered! I got a Raspberry Pi! I know quake can run on it... hell I can run quake on my android phone...
 
2013-03-14 05:26:17 PM
MithrandirBooga:

I've begun a new hobby. Every time somebody says they hate Windows 8, I ask them if they've actually used it. Four times out of Five, they haven't. The other 1 person says they hate how the start menu is gone. I respond "Windows key, type name of program, hit enter. Exactly how it worked it in Windows 7". Which of course means they start doing mental gymnastics trying to explain how they hate having to type a program name, and it was so much easier to spend 10 times more time hunting through 10,000 start menu icons.

I don't hate Windows 8, but I haven't used it much. It did seem OK though, and especially snappy on the Yoga I was using it on. I'm not sure it'd be worth it on a desktop, though. But, the lack of a start menu is annoying. I have literally nothing on my desktop (because it's usually obscured by a program's window) and I actively edit my start menu to ensure it has only the programs I care about. Not once have I searched for a program by typing, but I'm also limited to about 15 folders and 20 programs.
 
2013-03-14 05:42:29 PM
Good luck running a 1GB game in the cloud with ISP caps these days
/ISP's would love that idea
 
2013-03-14 07:09:51 PM

serial_crusher: If there's one lesson they should have taken away from Windows 8, it's that mobile and desktop OSes should not be combined.
Maybe Microsoft's big plan was actually to do something colossally stupid but trick Google into emulating them.


I agree. I took delivery of a PengPod which is an unlocked Adroid tablet that can also dual-boot Ubuntu Linux. While that's cool, using a desktop metaphor on a  tablet makes for a very sucky desktop experience.
 
2013-03-14 07:18:18 PM

syrynxx: Hmm. Does your business run on:
1) Facebook
2) Win32 applications for which the developer was fired years ago but still drive 100% of your revenue

1) You do not have a business; you are a teenage girl.
2) Sorry, there is no OS which supports you.  It used to be Windows; now it's not.

Dear Microsoft:  It's not the UI, it's the applications. Remember sweatily jumping around shouting 'developers developers developers'?  Don't abandon their API set, you morons.


What APIs did Microsoft abandon in Win8? Do you have a specific program that no longer works?
 
2013-03-14 08:47:38 PM
So ChromeOS is going to jump around on stage like a friggin moron with so much steroids & coke flowing through him, he's about ready to go 'Scanners'?...
 
2013-03-14 09:30:44 PM
serial_crusher: Hell, when I moved from 3.1 to 95 I actually (very briefly) tried to override the Explorer shell with the old school Program Manager.

When I moved from 3.1 to 95, I was happy to see Program Manager die the painful death it rightfully deserved.

// In 3.1, I was always replacing the shell with something else.
 
2013-03-14 09:59:32 PM

Cerebral Knievel: What about the old build engine based games.  Because i have a fondness/weakness for forcing Redneck Rampage on all platforms.


Lemme clarify my statement.  I really haven't run into many old Windows games that refuse to work under Windows 7 x86. DOS games are a completely different matter.

Redneck Rampage and other Build Engine games generally won't work under NT because they make an unsupported DPMI function call while setting up the VESA framebuffer.  There is a patch, but it doesn't work for my XP guest under VMWare.  Then you have to get a 3rd party driver to emulate a SoundBlaster in a VDM.

Personally, I just use DOSBox to emulate Redneck Rampage.  It works a hell of a lot better than the Windows Virtual DOS Machine (VDM/NTVDM) ever did, and even works on x86-64 editions of Windows.
 
2013-03-14 10:15:00 PM

Dinjiin: Cerebral Knievel: What about the old build engine based games.  Because i have a fondness/weakness for forcing Redneck Rampage on all platforms.

Lemme clarify my statement.  I really haven't run into many old Windows games that refuse to work under Windows 7 x86. DOS games are a completely different matter.

Redneck Rampage and other Build Engine games generally won't work under NT because they make an unsupported DPMI function call while setting up the VESA framebuffer.  There is a patch, but it doesn't work for my XP guest under VMWare.  Then you have to get a 3rd party driver to emulate a SoundBlaster in a VDM.

Personally, I just use DOSBox to emulate Redneck Rampage.  It works a hell of a lot better than the Windows Virtual DOS Machine (VDM/NTVDM) ever did, and even works on x86-64 editions of Windows.


I love old games, and just decided to eliminate the middleman. I have a nice old Dell PIII box with 98 running it. Plays all those old DOS games great. Playing Redneck Rampage, or TR1, or Duke 3D on a 26" widescreen monitor with native hardware acceleration is ....an experience.
 
2013-03-14 10:37:49 PM

lordargent: serial_crusher: Hell, when I moved from 3.1 to 95 I actually (very briefly) tried to override the Explorer shell with the old school Program Manager.

When I moved from 3.1 to 95, I was happy to see Program Manager die the painful death it rightfully deserved.

// In 3.1, I was always replacing the shell with something else.


The only other 3.1 shell I remember was Compaq's TabWorks...
 
2013-03-14 11:33:09 PM
That isn't fair! Microsoft is already drowning in a tsunami of suck!
 
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