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(Slate)   The time to end email signoffs is now   (slate.com) divider line 106
    More: Unlikely, pony express, Park Slope, Best Wishes  
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8201 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2013 at 9:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-13 09:32:32 PM

curmudg3on: I eschew formal greeting and closing lines in e-mail. My e-mail messages end with a signature which adheres to Usenet standards.

Usenet standards specify that a signature block should be displayed as plain text in a fixed-width font (no HTML, images, or other rich text), and should be delimited from the body of the message by a single line consisting of exactly two hyphens, followed by a space, followed by the end of line (i.e., "-- \n").[1] This latter prescription, which goes by many names, including "sig dashes", "signature cut line", "sig-marker", "sig separator" and "signature delimiter", allows software to automatically mark or remove the sig block as the receiver desires. The signature prefix chosen can be different for different people serving as a distinguishing feature of their signatures. A correct delimiter is required for a news posting program to receive the Good Netkeeping Seal of Approval. It is also recommended that a signature block should contain no more than four lines of less than eighty columns each; this keeps the overall size of the message down, conserving bandwidth as well as the time required to read the message, and ensures that eighty-column terminals can display the sig block properly. (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signature_block#E-mail_and_Usenet)


You do realize a .sig and a salutation are not the same animal, right?
 
2013-03-13 09:57:29 PM

saturn badger: curmudg3on: I eschew formal greeting and closing lines in e-mail. My e-mail messages end with a signature which adheres to Usenet standards.

Usenet standards specify that a signature block should be displayed as plain text in a fixed-width font (no HTML, images, or other rich text), and should be delimited from the body of the message by a single line consisting of exactly two hyphens, followed by a space, followed by the end of line (i.e., "-- \n").[1] This latter prescription, which goes by many names, including "sig dashes", "signature cut line", "sig-marker", "sig separator" and "signature delimiter", allows software to automatically mark or remove the sig block as the receiver desires. The signature prefix chosen can be different for different people serving as a distinguishing feature of their signatures. A correct delimiter is required for a news posting program to receive the Good Netkeeping Seal of Approval. It is also recommended that a signature block should contain no more than four lines of less than eighty columns each; this keeps the overall size of the message down, conserving bandwidth as well as the time required to read the message, and ensures that eighty-column terminals can display the sig block properly. (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signature_block#E-mail_and_Usenet)

You do realize a .sig and a salutation are not the same animal, right?


Not if he cannot tell the difference between an usenet post within an NNTP environment and an email outside of an NNTP environment.
 
2013-03-14 12:04:30 AM
I like to sign off like Thomas Hobbes of Malmsbury:

Your moft humble and obediant feruant,
 ExtremeFajita
 
2013-03-14 12:34:53 AM

Benjimin_Dover: saturn badger: curmudg3on: I eschew formal greeting and closing lines in e-mail. My e-mail messages end with a signature which adheres to Usenet standards.

Usenet standards specify that a signature block should be displayed as plain text in a fixed-width font (no HTML, images, or other rich text), and should be delimited from the body of the message by a single line consisting of exactly two hyphens, followed by a space, followed by the end of line (i.e., "-- \n").[1] This latter prescription, which goes by many names, including "sig dashes", "signature cut line", "sig-marker", "sig separator" and "signature delimiter", allows software to automatically mark or remove the sig block as the receiver desires. The signature prefix chosen can be different for different people serving as a distinguishing feature of their signatures. A correct delimiter is required for a news posting program to receive the Good Netkeeping Seal of Approval. It is also recommended that a signature block should contain no more than four lines of less than eighty columns each; this keeps the overall size of the message down, conserving bandwidth as well as the time required to read the message, and ensures that eighty-column terminals can display the sig block properly. (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signature_block#E-mail_and_Usenet)

You do realize a .sig and a salutation are not the same animal, right?

Not if he cannot tell the difference between an usenet post within an NNTP environment and an email outside of an NNTP environment.


My aged parents told me about the usenet.
 
2013-03-14 09:57:30 AM
Bullshiat,

Sounds like Matthew J.X. Malady just has a wild hair growing someplace 'private'. He begins by making a tirade against Complimentary Closings, and then goes on to degrade Salutations.

And yet, he capped his inane article with a Title - You Say "Best." I Say No. Why, a person might ask, would anybody title an article, much less capitAlize wordS in the middle of a Sentence? And just who is he quoting - I certainly didn't see any source given. He then added his moniker (which looks pretentious with all those middle initials), and even the Day, Date, and Time. Then, if you noticed, he used CAPITAL LETTERS in the usual places throughout the article, and even added Punctuation Marks. Why I ask, do we get all this drama pointed at a defenseless Complimentary Closing... unless he (assumption) is a member of the "old guard" (to use his phrase) himself.

Actually, one might compare a verbal telephone conversation with a written one. There are certain pleasantries, conventions, sentence structure, and word usage that become either necessary, or merely politeness in communication.

While I am not a linguist, I do enjoy an attempt at the proper use of capitalization and punctuation. And the polite 'hi' and 'bye'. To evade some of these conventions is merely laziness or disrespect, you definitely would add them to somebody that could help you personally help you financially or emotionally. But might purposefully omit them in communication with someone that you want to insult.

Texting might be different.

So There,

DaTheorist
 
2013-03-14 06:28:09 PM

MightyPez: There has been a lot of whiny articles like this lately. Yesterday on Gawker someone was throwing a hissy fit because people have the gall to leave him voicemails.


It pisses me off when people leave me long rambling voice mails while I try to call them back immediately, and they ignore the other call. It used to piss me off anytime someone left a long rambling voicemail, because I'd have to listen to the whole thing before I could delete it (my office phone is still stuck in 1999 this way) no matter how old it was, but visual voicemail on the cell phone makes it a snap to make them go away.

Worse are people who repeatedly call but don't leave a voicemail or drop an email, and don't pick up on a call back.
 
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