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(Guardian)   Iran to sue Hollywood over its unrealistic portrayal in Argo. Told to get in line behind William Wallace, the 300 Spartans, the Mayans and absolutely everyone involved in WWII   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 18
    More: Repeat, Hollywood, WWII, Iran, Iranian media, hostage crisis, diplomatic ties, Venezuelans, mayans  
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2045 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2013 at 8:16 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-13 08:24:26 AM
2 votes:

StrikitRich: Tehran hires French lawyer Isabelle Coutant-Peyre to bring case over Hollywood 'distorting image' of Islamic republic


graphics8.nytimes.com

www.petapixel.com

"How DARE you Hollywood!! Distorting images is our #1 industry!"
2013-03-13 03:47:42 PM
1 votes:

Mugato: Insatiable Jesus: Hollywood, an arm of Israeli media.

And the Republican party isn't?


The GOP's just a patsy for the reverse vampires acting at the behest of the Rand Corporation...
2013-03-13 03:19:27 PM
1 votes:

Flint Ironstag: Reaperman: MylesHeartVodak: Mendez was the document forger, and the real reason why the hostages departure took a few weeks was because the passports provided had the wrong dates on them.  Mendez had to correct them by hand.

There was a second CIA operative involved and on the scene, known only by the name of Julio.   So, what did role did Julio play?  Who was he?  I'm guessing that there is even more to the story that we will never know.

Wrong. The passports were fine and it had nothing to do with the delay. It was the entry visas that were incorrect and that was discovered at the moment. These had to be corrected by Mendez.

Aren't visas usually stamped in the passport? That's the way most countries do it. So if the visa dates were wrong then it was dates in the passport that were wrong?



Don't know the exact details but apparently when you arrived in Iran, you had fill in a form (visa). There were two copies - say one was yellow and one was white. The white (original) stayed with immigration and the yellow you were to keep. When you left the country, you had to hand in the yellow copy back to immigration. In the case of the six Americans, there wasn't a white copy since one was never actually created - at least not as Canadians. The concern was when the Americans were leaving and had to hand in the fake visa, the immigration officer may have decided to try and marry-up the two copies of the visa. And this is why the issue of the date being entered incorrectly was such a concern since it would have caused the immigration officer to certainly try and look for the non-existent original.
2013-03-13 11:23:50 AM
1 votes:

Norfolking Chance: rugman11: Norfolking Chance: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Everybody's going after Argo for not being 100% historically accurate, it's bizarre.  I don't think I've ever seen a historical recreation movie get so many people riled up over stupid details.  Who really cares who gave who a beer?  As long as major event aren't altered, what's the problem?


If Affleck had said from the start they had taken a liberty or two with the story no one would of minded but he said repeatedly that the film was historically accurate. Its only afterwards he climbed down and said some liberties with the story had been made.

What are people complaining about?  I've read Mendez's book and, while they took a couple of shortcuts, with the exception of the ending (and the Bazaar scene) I thought it hewed pretty closely to the story Mendez told.

This is a good list. The film showed wrongly that the NZ and the UK embassies turned them away (and showed them as cowards) when they actually sheltered them and only moved the Americans as the Canadian embassy was safer plus the Canadians did much more work than the CIA to get the Americans out.


I don't know.  It seems like a lot of those are pretty nitpicky.  It seems like they wanted to focus much more on the mission itself rather than the actual hostage situation, so they fast-tracked the Americans to the Taylor's house and kept them together rather than splitting them up.

As for Canada's involvement, according to Mendez's book, the CIA devised and executed the entire plan.  The Canadian government was crucial because they supplied the passports (and it was a critical part), but it was the CIA that created the cover, backstopped it, forged the visas, and ran the actual operation.

I guess it makes sense to me that, in a movie about the operation, that they would focus on the CIA.  Had the movie been about the hostages, Canada's role would have been more featured.
2013-03-13 10:16:17 AM
1 votes:

liam76: I though the "big deal" was that they covered the retreat,


Sort of. The basic events go roughly like this:
The pass above Thermopylae is essentially an impregnable point. The Greeks can hold the Persians there until a lack of supplies forces the Persians to turn back. According to legend, a traitor tells the Persians that there's a way to move a force behind the Greek forces, which will allow them to destroy the Greeks. The Greeks hear about it, and most of the army retreats. The Spartans and a few thousand other soldiers stick around to hold the pass. The most likely reason was to form a rear-guard, but Leonidas had also been told by the Oracle that he would die to save Sparta, so he may have been trying to fulfill a prophecy (which is kind of a dick move for the other 1,500 soldiers).

Regardless, the Spartans are quickly routed, and Thermopylae conquered. At this point, things are incredibly dire for the Greeks. The entire battle of Thermopylae is a failure. The Persians have Greece on the ropes. Athens has been evacuated, and the Persians take it. They take several other cities.

The war turns at Salamis.  Themistocles noticed during a previous battle that the Greek ships were better in close quarters than the Persians. He lured the Persians into attacking by spreading rumors that the already fractious Greek command structure was falling apart with infighting. Xerxes took that as a cue to attack, and sailed in- and his fleet was ambushed by the combined might of the Greek ships. This was sort of a Death Star moment- the Persian ships were vastly superior. The combination of surprise and cunning strategy left the Persians stranded in Greece, without enough ships to get home. Fearing that the Greeks would cut off their route back to Persia, Xerxes ordered a retreat.
2013-03-13 10:07:55 AM
1 votes:

Norfolking Chance: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Everybody's going after Argo for not being 100% historically accurate, it's bizarre.  I don't think I've ever seen a historical recreation movie get so many people riled up over stupid details.  Who really cares who gave who a beer?  As long as major event aren't altered, what's the problem?


If Affleck had said from the start they had taken a liberty or two with the story no one would of minded but he said repeatedly that the film was historically accurate. Its only afterwards he climbed down and said some liberties with the story had been made.


What are people complaining about?  I've read Mendez's book and, while they took a couple of shortcuts, with the exception of the ending (and the Bazaar scene) I thought it hewed pretty closely to the story Mendez told.
2013-03-13 09:33:25 AM
1 votes:

cynicalbastard: Well, technically, it was 300 Spartans- plus about 5000 other Greeks, including roughly 1000 Spartan slaves, who were promised freedom for all slaves who would fight for Sparta after the war. The Spartans kept their word, too, if you consider being murdered in a surprise attack as being freed from slavery.


Most of the other greeks left after they were flanked.

I though the "big deal" was that they covered the retreat,
2013-03-13 08:57:16 AM
1 votes:
"Turns out the kids today don't really identify with the struggle of their elders"

sixpacktech.com
agrees
2013-03-13 08:47:39 AM
1 votes:
I remember the stink about all the historical inaccuracies in this movie-

upload.wikimedia.org

Some do better than others, but all fail
2013-03-13 08:47:08 AM
1 votes:

cynicalbastard: The Spartans kept their word, too, if you consider being murdered in a surprise attack as being freed from slavery.


Well, they failed to specify the when and where.
2013-03-13 08:43:39 AM
1 votes:
Well, technically, it was 300 Spartans- plus about 5000 other Greeks, including roughly 1000 Spartan slaves, who were promised freedom for all slaves who would fight for Sparta after the war. The Spartans kept their word, too, if you consider being murdered in a surprise attack as being freed from slavery.
2013-03-13 08:40:55 AM
1 votes:

liam76: The Wrestler.


The outrage was that there were not nearly enough scenes of Marisa Tomei's tits
2013-03-13 08:35:22 AM
1 votes:
How about this MISSING SCENE from Argo????

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRBmBt8Y7Bk


That scene ALONE was better than the whole movie, and it was CUT???

Here are some boobies for no reason:
media1.break.com
2013-03-13 08:33:29 AM
1 votes:

liam76: Other Hollywood films that have infuriated Iranians include: 300, which depicts King Leonidas and a force of 300 men fighting the Persians at Thermopylae in 480 BC - which was described by Iran's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, as "insulting to Iran"; Brian Gilbert's 1991 film Not Without My Daughter; and The Wrestler.

Really?



Rourke's fictional rival in that movie was an Iron Shiek ripoff called The Ayatollah.
For a place that hates western culture so much, Iran certainly likes our "sue everybody" philosophy.
2013-03-13 08:28:42 AM
1 votes:
Other Hollywood films that have infuriated Iranians include: 300, which depicts King Leonidas and a force of 300 men fighting the Persians at Thermopylae in 480 BC - which was described by Iran's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, as "insulting to Iran"; Brian Gilbert's 1991 film Not Without My Daughter; and The Wrestler.

Really?
2013-03-13 08:22:00 AM
1 votes:
Maybe, they're just after royalties. After all, without Iran taking hostages, that movie would have never happened.
2013-03-13 08:21:29 AM
1 votes:
"defending Iran against films that have been made by Hollywood to distort the country's image"

Like they don't do a pretty good job of it themselves.
2013-03-13 08:17:44 AM
1 votes:
And this will accomplish so much
 
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