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(LA Times)   4.7 magnitude earthquake hits Los Angeles. Residents yawn, order another Starbucks   (latimes.com) divider line 51
    More: Scary, earthquakes, San Andreas Fault, Los Angeles, Greater Los Angeles Area, seismology, Riverside County, Los Angeles Unified School District, aftershocks  
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3006 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2013 at 9:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-13 09:43:48 AM
Meh.
 
2013-03-13 09:44:01 AM
Yeesh....I may complain about where I live, but at least the earth isn't trying as hard to kill me here
 
2013-03-13 09:44:05 AM
California sucks. Starbucks Sucks. Earthquakes Suck.

Everybody on the East Coast is COOL. (Except the a-holes in NJ and NYC)

/in before everyone else.
 
2013-03-13 09:46:05 AM
haha!  I knew I felt it. I was sitting at work, and my chair shook a little.  No one believed me!
 
2013-03-13 09:51:26 AM
Am I in before the Nevar forget tipped over lawn chair™
 
2013-03-13 09:54:51 AM
a2.img.mobypicture.com
The ground moved!
 
2013-03-13 09:56:16 AM
Earthquakes are a good sign from our planet. When our planets core cools down.....

The first thing you would notice is less volcanoes, and less earthquakes. Hey, that's fun -- but it's just the beginning. Slowly, wind and rain will begin to erode the Earth away. Very gradually, mountains will shrink. Grain by grain, they will crumble down, and get washed away by rain and rivers, into the sea. It will take hundreds of millions of years, that's the good news. But the bad news is that in the end, there will be no more land left! It's a bit strange to imagine, but when you level out all the land evenly across the globe, and smear it out onto the bottom of the sea, you would find nothing will be sticking out of the water. No continents, no rocks, no islands, not even a sand bank. All that will be gone forever.
 
2013-03-13 09:57:38 AM
NEVER FORGET!
 
2013-03-13 09:59:05 AM

Luminaro: haha!  I knew I felt it. I was sitting at work, and my chair shook a little.  No one believed me!


UNBELIEVABLE EARTHQUAKE STRIKES LOS ANGELES
 
2013-03-13 10:06:29 AM
As Maynard would put it, ignore the smoke, ignore the smoke and smile.
 
2013-03-13 10:06:44 AM
I live in San Bernardino county and didn't even feel it. Used to go off-roading  down in the area where it hit. Nothing out there but dirt, the Salton sea and meth heads.
 
2013-03-13 10:11:12 AM

ChipNASA: California sucks. Starbucks Sucks. Earthquakes Suck.

Everybody on the East Coast is COOL. (Except the a-holes in NJ and NYC)

/in before everyone else.


HEY!  I'm one of those a-holes!

/thanks for the shout-out, bro
//L.A. sucks
 
2013-03-13 10:11:23 AM
It's been 20 minutes and no one has said they hope we slide into the ocean and die. I feel neglected.
 
2013-03-13 10:19:46 AM

johnny queso: It's been 20 minutes and no one has said they hope we slide into the ocean and die. I feel neglected.


I hope you slide into the ocean and live because that would be socal
 
2013-03-13 10:24:27 AM
How does one "order a Starbucks"?
 
2013-03-13 10:27:35 AM
Just moved to L.A. from Minneapolis a month ago. Everyone back home clutched their pearls, and whispered "earthquakes!" at me all wide-eyed-like.

So, this was my first. And yeah, my chair at work moved a little, too. Ooooh, horrors. That's SO much worse than being buried in filthy, cursed snow 6 months out of the year. I'm totally moving back home, and stuff. Boy, howdy.
 
2013-03-13 10:30:24 AM
figured Rosie O Donnell farted...
bbsimg.ngfiles.com
 
2013-03-13 10:30:25 AM
The quake was initially recorded as three separate temblors because a foreshock tricked seismograms into recording multiple quakes of multiple sizes, said Susan Hough, a USGS seismologist

That's hawt.
 
2013-03-13 10:30:50 AM

neversubmit: johnny queso: It's been 20 minutes and no one has said they hope we slide into the ocean and die. I feel neglected.

I hope you slide into the ocean and live because that would be socal


Thank you. How does my hair look?
 
2013-03-13 10:38:42 AM

Dwight_Yeast: How does one "order a Starbucks"?


Would you like a coffee sir? No, I said Starbucks - as in a whole franchise. I think one would look lovely on that corner over there.
 
2013-03-13 10:50:33 AM

MaxxLarge: Just moved to L.A. from Minneapolis a month ago. Everyone back home clutched their pearls, and whispered "earthquakes!" at me all wide-eyed-like.

So, this was my first. And yeah, my chair at work moved a little, too. Ooooh, horrors. That's SO much worse than being buried in filthy, cursed snow 6 months out of the year. I'm totally moving back home, and stuff. Boy, howdy.


You won't be missed! Have fun learning about 100 year events!

/can still drive through snow
//can't drive through collapsed infrastructure
 
2013-03-13 10:52:03 AM
I feel the earth. move. un-der-my feet.
I feel the skyyyyy tumblin' down a-TUM-buh-lin' down.
 
2013-03-13 11:19:31 AM
I have friends in the middle of the country who like to tease me about our earthquakes.  Like they're at all comparable to tornadoes and blizzards...  We've had exactly one earthquake in my lifetime that I would consider noteworthy:  Loma Prieta.

Then I scare the shiat out of them with my Dad's story of the quake he was in while in the Navy.  Link
 
2013-03-13 11:29:54 AM
4.7 earth quake ain't nothin' to the folks in L.A..
An inch of snow would be a major farkin disaster though.
 
2013-03-13 11:35:48 AM
Meh.

\live in Los Angeles
\\didn't notice it
 
2013-03-13 11:39:54 AM

Mr.Hawk: The quake was initially recorded as three separate temblors because a foreshock tricked seismograms into recording multiple quakes of multiple sizes, said Susan Hough, a USGS seismologist

That's hawt.


Griffith Observatory (here in Los Angeles) has a seismograph that visitors can see.  The Fukushima earthquake was large enough that seismographs here in Los Angeles were going crazy.  Not tiny blips, either; huge amplitudes on the seismograms.
 
2013-03-13 11:45:40 AM

Honest Bender: I have friends in the middle of the country who like to tease me about our earthquakes.  Like they're at all comparable to tornadoes and blizzards...


Having grown up in the Midwest, I prefer tornadoes to earthquakes, largely because you have tornado warnings; no such warnings for earthquakes*.

That said, the few earthquakes I've felt since moving to California have been exceedingly mild and far from note-worthy.

*Actually, my landlord shared this story: He was chatting on the phone with his brother who was several miles away in downtown L.A.  The brother says, "Hey, did you feel that?  It was an earthquake."  A few moments pass and then our landlord feels the shaking.  So, in some sense, he did receive an "earthquake warning."
 
2013-03-13 11:48:53 AM
Two days to talk about an earthquake? C'mon farkmods. Greenlight stuff faster.

/did about a foot-long shake to the left when the quake hit, totally screwed up a picture he was taking
 
2013-03-13 12:33:27 PM

FizixJunkee: Mr.Hawk: The quake was initially recorded as three separate temblors because a foreshock tricked seismograms into recording multiple quakes of multiple sizes, said Susan Hough, a USGS seismologist

That's hawt.

Griffith Observatory (here in Los Angeles) has a seismograph that visitors can see.  The Fukushima earthquake was large enough that seismographs here in Los Angeles were going crazy.  Not tiny blips, either; huge amplitudes on the seismograms.


I keep seeing the word orgasm.Then its gone.then there it is again.then its gone.
 
2013-03-13 12:45:33 PM
As Lindsey lights Amanda's cigarette...
 
2013-03-13 12:55:35 PM

MyKingdomForYourHorse: Yeesh....I may complain about where I live, but at least the earth isn't trying as hard to kill me here


No matter where you live, Mother Nature is trying to kill you...somehow, some way...tornados, tsunamis, hurricanes, freezing cold, too much rain, too little rain, etc.

/I'll take my chances here in Cali... ;^)
 
2013-03-13 01:10:08 PM
There was an earthquake on Monday?  Well damn.  Totally missed it.

/Pasadena, didn't notice.
 
2013-03-13 01:29:37 PM
My apartment building has been thumping constantly the past few days so I guess that explains it. I haven't actually felt any shaking though.
 
2013-03-13 02:01:33 PM
Here's the thing about Southern California. We might occasionally get tremors, but how can you beat being able to work on your suntan in the middle of January?

/would rather live in Canada, actually, but can appreciate SoCal
 
2013-03-13 02:06:14 PM
So given that I just moved to the Bay Area from Michigan, how worried do I need to be about this stuff?

I mean if there's a big one, I'm farked and all my stuff is farked and that's just a thing, but how worried do I need to be about a 4.2 earthquake walking one of my monitors off the desk or knocking over my not-terribly stable bookshelf?
 
2013-03-13 02:32:41 PM

Deep Contact: Earthquakes are a good sign from our planet. When our planets core cools down.....

The first thing you would notice is less volcanoes, and less earthquakes. Hey, that's fun -- but it's just the beginning. Slowly, wind and rain will begin to erode the Earth away. Very gradually, mountains will shrink. Grain by grain, they will crumble down, and get washed away by rain and rivers, into the sea. It will take hundreds of millions of years, that's the good news. But the bad news is that in the end, there will be no more land left! It's a bit strange to imagine, but when you level out all the land evenly across the globe, and smear it out onto the bottom of the sea, you would find nothing will be sticking out of the water. No continents, no rocks, no islands, not even a sand bank. All that will be gone forever.


I bet your cat has AIDS

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-03-13 02:57:21 PM
So given that I just moved to the Bay Area from Michigan, how worried do I need to be about this stuff?

I mean if there's a big one, I'm farked and all my stuff is farked and that's just a thing, but how worried do I need to be about a 4.2 earthquake walking one of my monitors off the desk or knocking over my not-terribly stable bookshelf?



It would take something closer to a 5.0 to walk your monitor off the desk, unless you are right on top of the epicenter and/or your monitor is right on the edge of the table.
 
2013-03-13 03:21:50 PM
Woah! They buy whole coffee stores in LA?
 
2013-03-13 03:47:33 PM
Felt it here in Pasadena.  Building swayed very gently, it was actually kind of soothing.
 
2013-03-13 04:09:44 PM

FizixJunkee: Honest Bender: I have friends in the middle of the country who like to tease me about our earthquakes.  Like they're at all comparable to tornadoes and blizzards...

Having grown up in the Midwest, I prefer tornadoes to earthquakes, largely because you have tornado warnings; no such warnings for earthquakes*.

That said, the few earthquakes I've felt since moving to California have been exceedingly mild and far from note-worthy.

*Actually, my landlord shared this story: He was chatting on the phone with his brother who was several miles away in downtown L.A.  The brother says, "Hey, did you feel that?  It was an earthquake."  A few moments pass and then our landlord feels the shaking.  So, in some sense, he did receive an "earthquake warning."


The "earthquake warning" your landlord's brother felt was the earthquake itself. Typically, earthquakes give off P-waves and S-waves. P-waves travel much faster than S-waves so they are felt soon.
 
2013-03-13 05:03:46 PM

Amidala: FizixJunkee: Honest Bender: I have friends in the middle of the country who like to tease me about our earthquakes.  Like they're at all comparable to tornadoes and blizzards...

Having grown up in the Midwest, I prefer tornadoes to earthquakes, largely because you have tornado warnings; no such warnings for earthquakes*.

That said, the few earthquakes I've felt since moving to California have been exceedingly mild and far from note-worthy.

*Actually, my landlord shared this story: He was chatting on the phone with his brother who was several miles away in downtown L.A.  The brother says, "Hey, did you feel that?  It was an earthquake."  A few moments pass and then our landlord feels the shaking.  So, in some sense, he did receive an "earthquake warning."

The "earthquake warning" your landlord's brother felt was the earthquake itself. Typically, earthquakes give off P-waves and S-waves. P-waves travel much faster than S-waves so they are felt soon.


I meant it was a warning for my landlord, not his brother.
 
2013-03-13 05:10:56 PM
Anything below a 6 literally isn't worth getting up for.  Imagine if you live in the Blues Brothers apartment and the El goes by-that's worse than a 6.

I felt this one, and I could tell it was both fairly far away and minor.  Minor, because it was meh.  Fairly far away, because it lasted for awhile.
 
2013-03-13 05:49:19 PM
My desk wobbled for about 8-10 seconds. Dog and cats slept through it. This was one of the more 'interesting' ones in the year I've lived here (about 30 miles west of the epicenter.)

Still agree with the comment upthread about working on your tan in January. Don't miss NH and the weather that's been plaguing the northeast this year at all!
 
2013-03-13 06:48:43 PM

Deep Contact: Earthquakes are a good sign from our planet. When our planets core cools down.....

The first thing you would notice is less volcanoes, and less earthquakes. Hey, that's fun -- but it's just the beginning. Slowly, wind and rain will begin to erode the Earth away. Very gradually, mountains will shrink. Grain by grain, they will crumble down, and get washed away by rain and rivers, into the sea. It will take hundreds of millions of years, that's the good news. But the bad news is that in the end, there will be no more land left! It's a bit strange to imagine, but when you level out all the land evenly across the globe, and smear it out onto the bottom of the sea, you would find nothing will be sticking out of the water. No continents, no rocks, no islands, not even a sand bank. All that will be gone forever.


I don't think it will come to that.  When the core cools that means it's slowing down.  When it stops spinning, we lose our electromagnetic field that acts as a shield against solar wind.  When that goes the atmosphere will be slowly eroded, and when that happens any water that isn't trapped under the surface will evaporate and also be blown out into space.  That's also what many scientists theorize happened to Mars some time in the past.
 
2013-03-13 06:48:52 PM
In Long Beach, didn't feel anything.

Also, didn't have to use my AK.  Today, was a good day.
 
2013-03-13 06:50:32 PM
Also, Starbucks?  Fark that.  Coffee Bean is where its at.  Yo.
 
2013-03-13 07:35:49 PM

SirEattonHogg: Also, Starbucks?  Fark that.  Coffee Bean is where its at.  Yo.


Yup.  Coffee Bean is *the* go-to coffee joint in these parts.

\Coffee Bean is also kosher
 
2013-03-13 08:30:29 PM

Neondistraction: Deep Contact: Earthquakes are a good sign from our planet. When our planets core cools down.....

The first thing you would notice is less volcanoes, and less earthquakes. Hey, that's fun -- but it's just the beginning. Slowly, wind and rain will begin to erode the Earth away. Very gradually, mountains will shrink. Grain by grain, they will crumble down, and get washed away by rain and rivers, into the sea. It will take hundreds of millions of years, that's the good news. But the bad news is that in the end, there will be no more land left! It's a bit strange to imagine, but when you level out all the land evenly across the globe, and smear it out onto the bottom of the sea, you would find nothing will be sticking out of the water. No continents, no rocks, no islands, not even a sand bank. All that will be gone forever.

I don't think it will come to that.  When the core cools that means it's slowing down.  When it stops spinning, we lose our electromagnetic field that acts as a shield against solar wind.  When that goes the atmosphere will be slowly eroded, and when that happens any water that isn't trapped under the surface will evaporate and also be blown out into space.  That's also what many scientists theorize happened to Mars some time in the past.


We'll find ourselves on a kind of Mars the Second: a lifeless, airless, waterless, dead world -- with only some gullies and dried-up river beds remembering of its more lively past.

If that doesn't depress you, there's this: the freezing of the core seems quite inevitable. It isn't some speculative, weird phenomenon -- most experts agree the freeze-up is indeed going to happen one day.
 
2013-03-13 09:05:47 PM
Deep Contact:

If that doesn't depress you, there's this: the freezing of the core seems quite inevitable. It isn't some speculative, weird phenomenon -- most experts agree the freeze-up is indeed going to happen one day.

But will it happen before or after the Sun goes red giant?
 
2013-03-13 09:55:08 PM
4.7? Don't bother waking me up unless it's at least a 6.
 
2013-03-14 09:13:36 PM

FizixJunkee: Deep Contact:

If that doesn't depress you, there's this: the freezing of the core seems quite inevitable. It isn't some speculative, weird phenomenon -- most experts agree the freeze-up is indeed going to happen one day.

But will it happen before or after the Sun goes red giant?


Some 2,000,000,000 years, it is estimated. The sun will start affecting us too. Pick your poison.
 
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