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(Mother Nature Network)   Six years after China launched an anti-satellite test into space, debris from it hit and destroyed a Russian satellite   (mnn.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Russians, Russian satellite, military satellite, Earth Orbit, TechMediaNetwork  
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5114 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2013 at 9:14 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-13 05:30:14 PM  

Lets talk frankly about internal cleanliness: Clemkadidlefark: ferretman: Low Earth orbit debris:

[earthobservatory.nasa.gov image 468x468]

Ought to be able to hit something in that traffic jam

/but six years?

The distances between those objects are still quite large. The odds of intersection at orbital speed are still quite low. It would be like trying to hit a bullet with another bullet fired from a different direction at great distance... very difficult, even when you're trying to make it happen. The amount of satellites and debris we have between Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Orbit is simply miniscule when compared to the absolute nothing the occupies the same volume of space.


The distances are large, but they're moving very fast.  There are thousands of events/day that reach the 1 in a million threshold.  And that's just for the stuff that's actually tracked, which is a small fraction of what's up there.  In fact, the original author jumped the gun on this one - the russian satellite was hit by something, but it wasn't the piece of chinese satellite that was claimed.  Apparently some untracked debris from everything I've seen.
 
2013-03-13 06:53:25 PM  
What I want to know is this:

Where's the Russian dashcam video from the Russian satellite?  Surely they had a dashcam running up there...
 
2013-03-13 07:11:56 PM  

ZAZ: I remember that story but not its name. It was set on the Moon and was probably a Cold War story with Americans vs. Reds. More than one story has had orbital bullets on the moon, but one of them is semi-famous.


I remember that one. Every once in a while, on a semi regular schedule: Cold War on the Moon.
"OK everyone! Lay down!"

Apparently, they had all the orbital mechanics worked out and could predict quite closely when the fragments would cruise through. Of course, cruising through changed the orbits every so slightly.
 
2013-03-13 07:37:23 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: I remember that one. Every once in a while, on a semi regular schedule: Cold War on the Moon.
"OK everyone! Lay down!"


I remember that one. Every once in a while, on a semi regular schedule: "OK everyone! Lay down!"

/Formatting? What?
 
gja
2013-03-13 07:54:40 PM  

priapic_abandon: I remember reading a sci fi short story years ago about a world with low enough gravity that a rifle bullet could reach orbital velocity and would orbit just above ground level. Also, it was airless (no atmo drag) so they must have had space rifles or something. Anyway, there was a war going on there and every time they'd reach a peace agreement one of the many very low orbit projectiles would end up hitting someone, thereby restarting hostilities. Can't remember the name of the story.


Pffft, powder-fired guns in space are a fail.
Rail-guns, now that will tear your arse a new exit hole.
 
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