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(Some Hee-Haw)   Cedar Rapids, Iowa hosting a convention specifically for single farmers who are looking a partner that shares a love of corn and overalls   (radioiowa.com ) divider line
    More: Sappy, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, reseller hosting, farming  
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2830 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Mar 2013 at 11:12 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-12 04:16:04 PM  

show me: So one side effect of this would seem to be the creation of artificial shortages. It's probably pretty complicated, with the fallow land being able to recover some nutrients, etc. but producing all we can without farking up the land seems like it would be good for our trade balance.


It's not the land. We have plenty of that.

And I'm not sure if artificial is the right word for this. Corn is just like any other commodity you make more of it and the price will naturally dip. Economics works. We could feed the world with our current level of ability the only problem is that the world can't afford to be feed. If we actually kicked up production to the point of feeding every man woman and child and sold it for the price they could afford the prices would crash
 
2013-03-12 04:25:08 PM  

HeadLever: One or two bad years could wipe a huge number of them out leaving Big Ag to pick over their bones


I figured it out, in the past ten years, my fathers farm subsidies figure out to an average of $1000 a year.

That is not enough to buy the seed corn with. He knows he could live without them, but hey if its there why not take it?

HeadLever: if youare a farmer/rancher you are likely land rich and cash poor.  You are sitting on milllions in assets, but you owe your soul to the bank.


My grandfather is a stock market whiz (except for selling his WalMart stock too soon).  He made a ton of money in the market, enough to retire on.  He is in his mid 80's and still goes out everyday at 7:00 am (instead of 6:00 am, that is his "retirement").  We are an exception, somehow we have had a combination of brains and good luck.  Many others in the area have not.

HeadLever: For these folks, the problem is trying to keep the kids involved. That is why the Paul Harvey piece hits home for thoise that know what this life involves.


Yeah, I have an older brother.  He was the one groomed to the farm, and I was groomed for college.  My dad was going to go to college (was accepted and everything) but decided to stay on the farm, and was so happy when I went to college.

Now, I work in a building all day with people that annoy me.  My brother turned out to be a lazy good for nothing and hates my dad.  I keep trying to get back but my dad just thinks I have a better life (which isn't true).  I am trying to start my own, but damn it is hard.
 
2013-03-12 04:33:47 PM  

stonicus: HeadLever: Wild Eyed and Wicked: I do not talk "farm" normally without people who are not used to it...

It is really sad how far removed most people are from the source of their own food.

It is really sad how far removed most people are from the source of their own electronic devices.


Please talk some more about Linux.
 
2013-03-12 04:42:24 PM  

jaytkay: Cuz nobody else works hard or has family businesses, only farmers do that.


What the hell you talking about skippy?
 
2013-03-12 04:49:13 PM  

Burr: Now, I work in a building all day with people that annoy me. My brother turned out to be a lazy good for nothing and hates my dad. I keep trying to get back but my dad just thinks I have a better life (which isn't true). I am trying to start my own, but damn it is hard.


As a civil engineer, I try to capitalize on every opportunity to go back and move irrigation pipes, brand, plow, fix fence and help in any way I can on the ranches I grew up around.  Good folks and good work.
 
2013-03-12 04:58:55 PM  

HeadLever: jaytkay: Cuz nobody else works hard or has family businesses, only farmers do that.

What the hell you talking about skippy?


He apprently thinks somebody said "only farmers suffer" instead of "most farmers suffer and it is a dying part of america" cause you know we are in a thread about farming.....


Here, I will help him in his trolling.  Nobody gets into farming to make it into a massively profitable business, and if they do they soon learn the folly of their ways.  You will never see a farmer who hires people to do the work for him 100%.  Not only are they doing the books in the backroom, and ordering inventory, they are stocking the shelves, cleaning the bathrooms, getting biatched at by the customers, opening the store, closing the store, on call 24/7, open on all holidays, and no vacation time. Bad weather, power outages, 100 degree days, mean nothing to a farmer. You rarely see them retire unless they are forced too (and most would die in the field then in a hospital).  Plus, while you may be able to close a store for a weekend or a sunday, you can never close a farm.  It has to be running everyday.

/was lucky if we went on a week long family vacation every five years
 
2013-03-12 05:11:24 PM  

HeadLever: As a civil engineer, I try to capitalize on every opportunity to go back and move irrigation pipes, brand, plow, fix fence and help in any way I can on the ranches I grew up around.  Good folks and good work.


I usually try to show up around baling season.  Makes it easier if there is another hand to help lift thousands of straw bales in July with 90 degree heat and 80% humidity for a good 6 straight hours praying for a nice breeze. That is if you are lucky....

If you are unlucky, you are unloading in the barn.

Other then that, I work 11 hours a day for my job and have two small children, makes it harder to get over there.
 
2013-03-12 07:05:17 PM  

Burr: He apprently thinks somebody said "only farmers suffer" instead of "most farmers suffer and it is a dying part of america" cause you know we are in a thread about farming.....


No, I think that lots of people work hard and even suffer.

But the argument is being made here that farmers are unique and we have to subsidize the industry to preserve and admittedly nonviable business model.

Should we create programs to keep family-owned hardware stores in business? Should the corner tavern be propped up by the taxpayers so it can compete with TGIF Fridays?
 
2013-03-12 07:12:49 PM  
The farmers I know are really nice people, tend to be politically centrist along the lines of "if they're workin', then sure, our taxes should be used to help give 'em a leg up, but if they don't want to work, we won't feed 'em," and think absolutely nothing of learning a new skill in order to get the job done. I had a guy in his fifties who came in to one of the classes I sometimes run at the library. He wanted to learn how to use a computer better because he could only manage email and QuickBooks and his kids had told him that city people were paying crazy-good money for organically-grown or free-range food, if he could just get online more.

Within six weeks, he was coding HTML, setting up Wi-Fi networks for his friends and passing his evenings playing MMORPGs with his grandsons. I'd never seen a guy learn so much so fast. He'd take the lessons with everyone else, but then he'd go and buy a book and practice every free moment he had, plus he'd pay me for an hour or two of my time here and there to get him really in-depth on specific things. By the four-month mark, he had a website, a thingy for his brand-new smartphone so he could swipe cards when people paid him at the farmer's market and was making more than any of the other farmers who offered similar things because his marketing was direct and better.

And he thought nothing more of it than when he'd gone to the community-college and learned to weld, do electrical wiring or install plumbing so he could do his own. Job needs a skill, farmer gets a skill. That simple. It was such a different, refreshing attitude to learning, and I've tried to follow his lead since. (I can install plumbing and next week I'm going to a carpentry class!)

Since I worked for an I.T. firm in a semi-rural area at the time and was teaching computer skills on the side, my manager suggested I accept barter for lessons if people offered it. I never regretted it for a second. Laid-that-day eggs, veggies so fresh they still had some dirt on 'em, and for Christmas the farmer who learned so fast gave me one of the hams he'd raised and smoked himself as a present. (I gave him a 2TB external hard drive, as we'd gotten to be good friends.) Tastiest ham I'd ever had in my life. For a second I felt a little weird, because I'd met all four of his hogs while they were alive and was nervous I might recognize which one was Christmas dinner, but just smelling it, I got over my city-girl squeamishness.

My husband, who grew up in farm country and fought hard to become an engineer so he wouldn't have to live as farmers do, still likes them and we have a lot of friends who farm. We'd never be able to live that way ourselves full-time (it's just not what we're good at or comfortable with long-term,) but we do love to lend a hand when our friends are baling, lambing or need someone to trap the barn cats for neutering and vaccinations, and it turns out I'm not bad at sheep-shearing.
 
2013-03-12 07:26:36 PM  

Cowkitchen2: people who smoke, drink, do drugs, or have other unhealthful habits.


Hey now, let's not get carried away with this two minutes of hate session.
 
2013-03-12 08:10:18 PM  
i could just dig grandpa out of the ground and kick his corpse for selling out in '65 and moving into town

yeah, indoor plumbing is great though
 
2013-03-12 08:20:40 PM  
 
2013-03-12 08:50:34 PM  

jaytkay: But the argument is being made here that farmers are unique and we have to subsidize the industry to preserve and admittedly nonviable business model.


lol, who said it was unique? It is hard work for meger pay.  Nothing less, nothing more.  And it is viable if you put in the time, effort and needed resources.  Who is admitting that it is nonviable besides you?
 
2013-03-12 08:57:17 PM  

jaytkay: Should we create programs to keep family-owned hardware stores in business? Should the corner tavern be propped up by the taxpayers so it can compete with TGIF Fridays?


I guess we shouldn't expect the elitist dumbasses to know the difference between food and weed eater string.  You exlemplify the point to a T.
 
2013-03-12 09:00:26 PM  

jaytkay: Burr: He apprently thinks somebody said "only farmers suffer" instead of "most farmers suffer and it is a dying part of america" cause you know we are in a thread about farming.....

No, I think that lots of people work hard and even suffer.

But the argument is being made here that farmers are unique and we have to subsidize the industry to preserve and admittedly nonviable business model.

Should we create programs to keep family-owned hardware stores in business? Should the corner tavern be propped up by the taxpayers so it can compete with TGIF Fridays?


Look at the link I posted above to see how the subsidies are distributed.  Joe the farmer barely gets anything, at least not enough to make a difference.  Most small time family farmers will agree that subsidies are ridiculous. And there are government programs to help every business, not just farmers, just subsidies are large enough to be noticed.
 
2013-03-12 09:04:57 PM  

Burr: I usually try to show up around baling season.


Unfortunately, I have hay fever, so I get to miss out on cutting, bailing and stacking.  Can move pipes and flood irrigate in it all day long though.
 
2013-03-12 09:11:45 PM  

HeadLever: Who is admitting that it is nonviable besides you?


Some angry jerkoff who keeps blirting out "elitist!" and "dumbasses!" and "bigots!" says family farms only exist thanks to government subsidies. Yell at him, not me. Here's the quote:

HeadLever: Which translates into price support for some. As Stealth alluded to, many of these programs are intended to keep small farmers IN buisness. One or two bad years could wipe a huge number of them out leaving Big Ag to pick over their bones.

 
2013-03-12 09:12:41 PM  

Burr: Look at the link I posted above to see how the subsidies are distributed.


Farm subsidies should be centered around making sure that farms can make it through the rough times and not for lining the pockets of those that know how to play the system.  They are there to ensure a constant and stable food supply.  That is Item #1 in any society.

If you ever want to screw with society, start messing around with the food supply.
 
2013-03-12 09:19:24 PM  

jaytkay: Some angry jerkoff who keeps blirting out "elitist!" and "dumbasses!" and "bigots!" says family farms only exist thanks to government subsidies.


where did I say that?  You making stuff up again?
 
2013-03-12 09:25:59 PM  
Crap, my bold did not work.  let's try that again:

Some angry jerkoff who keeps blirting out "elitist!" and "dumbasses!" and "bigots!" says family farms only exist thanks to government subsidies.
 
2013-03-12 09:27:17 PM  

HeadLever: jaytkay: Some angry jerkoff who keeps blirting out "elitist!" and "dumbasses!" and "bigots!" says family farms only exist thanks to government subsidies.

where did I say that?  You making stuff up again?


Holy crap, your dishonesty is too stunning.
 
2013-03-12 09:35:00 PM  

jaytkay: Holy crap, your dishonesty is too stunning.


No your twisting of my point is, though.
 
2013-03-12 09:50:32 PM  
Come on Jaykay, show me where I said that 'farms ONLY exist thanks to government subsides".  Still waiting on justification of your dumb point.

Or did you slink off already?
 
2013-03-12 10:21:00 PM  

Burr: HeadLever: As a civil engineer, I try to capitalize on every opportunity to go back and move irrigation pipes, brand, plow, fix fence and help in any way I can on the ranches I grew up around.  Good folks and good work.

I usually try to show up around baling season.  Makes it easier if there is another hand to help lift thousands of straw bales in July with 90 degree heat and 80% humidity for a good 6 straight hours praying for a nice breeze. That is if you are lucky....

If you are unlucky, you are unloading in the barn.

Other then that, I work 11 hours a day for my job and have two small children, makes it harder to get over there.


I always get the loft because my old man has a bad knee and my brothers are incompetent. I don't mind it much, I'd rather sweat it out and make sure the mow's built properly
 
2013-03-12 10:24:21 PM  

Burr: and have two small children,


I do too. I spend a good chunk of time trying to figure out how I can get them the same experiences that I had growing up.
 
2013-03-13 12:26:37 AM  
a love of corn, overalls and a city of five smells...
 
2013-03-13 12:31:49 AM  
I tried to make something beautiful.

Ya'll messed it right up
 
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