If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Man's reaction to being arrested inside his own building for "loitering" by the NYPD sums up why keeping your civil rights is so hard: "I don't want to be stopped," he said. "But I also don't {it} to happen to my family"   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 123
    More: Sad, New York Police Department, civil rights, New York Civil Liberties Union, Michael Bloomberg, State of the City  
•       •       •

21279 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Mar 2013 at 3:50 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



123 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-11 06:11:19 PM
Regardless of who opted in to this program and who paid for what, the problem is that the police aren't just checking with people to see if they belong there, they're harassing and detaining them. Seriously? A teenage kid ont he way to the store? What makes THAT look like loitering? Did he stop to talk to a friend on the way back up or something? All the NY cops have to do is stop acting like assholes, but they don't seem to be able to grasp this concept.
 
2013-03-11 06:17:33 PM
Maybe if we have some way of identifying who people are. Some sort of paper or papers that the person can show to law enforcement officers so that they can let the person go do things on his on recognizance. Some sort of papers that militarily trained peace officers can accept as legitimate. I wonder if there's been any previous experiment on that.
 
2013-03-11 06:20:38 PM

fsbilly: So, the police detain him for loitering at building he doesn't live in. They question him and contact his mom who verifies that he has a legitimate reason to be there and they release him.

Hate to say it, but it sounds like the program worked exactly as it's supposed to. Don't like it? Buy yourself a house where you can do as you please.

/And have some brioche while you're at it.


So explain the teenager sent to get some ketchup. If all he's doing is going from Point A to Point B and back, there is no reason to detain or even question, now is there?
 
2013-03-11 06:34:24 PM
More and More each month, New York City is slowly becoming MegaCity-1.
 
2013-03-11 06:37:46 PM
Did you see this PROPOGANDA film put out by North Korea about the US???:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eem8FO4uP-c

And here are some boobies, just because.  She is Korean, just to stay "on topic":

www.musicasia.net
 
2013-03-11 06:38:48 PM

dready zim: lordargent: Spade: Is "loitering" NYPD code for "black guy standing around not doing anything otherwise illegal"?

s/black guy/anyone we don't like the look of/

For example
A white guy wearing a trench coat on a bright sunny day.
Asian guys changing their windshield wipers in a pep boys parking lot
Hispanic guys in a low rider (even if the low rider happens to be moving at the time)
A white guy sitting in an unmarked van, down by the river

etc


Please use the quote system ;) I read that as `Spade: Is "loitering" NYPD code for "black guy `



I don't see the problem.
 
2013-03-11 06:38:58 PM

Stephen_Falken: It's about time the rest of you slackers got a taste of the police state that California has already become. Welcome to your future, you earned it by allowing that piece of sh*t Cheney to steal the elections


I'm not sure you are directing your anger at "California Uber Alles" at the correct culprits there sparky.
 
2013-03-11 06:40:36 PM

Stephen_Falken: Well now. It's about time the rest of you slackers got a taste of the police state that California has already become. Welcome to your future, you earned it by allowing that piece of sh*t Cheney to steal the elections and shove America so far right that it may never recover its balance. Screw you guys, I'm going to Europe once I finish my degree.


Damn Poe's Law.
 
2013-03-11 06:44:47 PM

durbnpoisn: A couple of weeks ago, my car broke down, and I had to sit on the side of Rt 1, in PA, for 45 minutes waiting for the tow truck. For anyone that's ever been down that road, you'd know how scary that is. Traffic whizzes by at like 80mph!


If you mean US-1, I'm curious where you find a sufficiently traffic-free stretch to get up to 80mph.
 
2013-03-11 06:47:11 PM

Burr: Authoritarianism knows no political boundaries.


Good old pre-WWII Europe.

Monarchism, fascism, and communism fighting to see which policy could best grind the people into the mud.
 
2013-03-11 06:47:37 PM
s4e9344b0eef80.img.gostorego.com
 
2013-03-11 06:49:53 PM

Magorn: wgb423: A private owner has every right to allow the police to enter the common areas of their property,  There doesn't need to be any special program in place.

Why would a property owner do this?

1)  It keeps trouble out of the hallways.
2)  If the police do need to enter the building, they use a key instead of a foot.
3)  It costs the building owner $1  (to make a copy of the hallway key)

 It isn't a civil rights violation in they are INVITED by the property owner.

Property owners aren;t the only ones with civil rights, particularly 4th Amendment ones, nor can the cops, absent the owner's specific participation in every case, on their own dtermine who is a tresspasser and who is an invitee


If the tenants don't like it, they can go and purchase their own property somewhere else.
 
2013-03-11 07:10:09 PM

LemSkroob: If the tenants don't like it, they can go and purchase their own property somewhere else.


For now. I suppose they can just get allodial title if they don't want to worry about HOAs, too, huh?

/the camel is sticking his head in the tent
 
2013-03-11 07:12:35 PM

Mikey1969: fsbilly: So, the police detain him for loitering at building he doesn't live in. They question him and contact his mom who verifies that he has a legitimate reason to be there and they release him.

Hate to say it, but it sounds like the program worked exactly as it's supposed to. Don't like it? Buy yourself a house where you can do as you please.

/And have some brioche while you're at it.

So explain the teenager sent to get some ketchup. If all he's doing is going from Point A to Point B and back, there is no reason to detain or even question, now is there?


No, you explain it to me. Usually, when you're going to the store to get ketchup you're moving toward a store with some money, or you're moving toward your building with some farking ketchup. I am going to venture to guess that he wasn't doing either of these things but, instead, was farking off in a location with a "No farking Off" sign posted.

"Yay, another reason never to go to New York."

NYC is crying itself to sleep tonight.
 
2013-03-11 07:15:01 PM

durbnpoisn: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: "We don't feel safe, but it's because of the police,"

This is becoming the norm.

A couple of weeks ago, my car broke down, and I had to sit on the side of Rt 1, in PA, for 45 minutes waiting for the tow truck.  For anyone that's ever been down that road, you'd know how scary that is.  Traffic whizzes by at like 80mph!

The one thing that amazed me was that for all that time, I didn't see one cop.  Not one.  I would really have liked to have a cop there with lights to draw attenton to my car.

When I mentioned this to the driver, he shrugged and said, "That's the way it is with the cops.  They are like Nanny McFee.  When you need them they aren't around.  And when you don't want them, there they are."

Nice analogy...


They just ignored your call, right?
 
2013-03-11 07:20:59 PM

Glancing Blow: I'm an internet lawyer:  Excluding cooperatives and condominiums, the building owner owns the hallways, hence they are the private property of the owner.  The rights you have on a public street are different than on private property.


which is why they should hire security guards.
 
2013-03-11 07:50:00 PM

Fark_Guy_Rob: Due to poor life decisions (either made by myself or my parents, depending on my age) - I've always lived in crappy parts of town.  Some places worse than others; none so bad as the 'inner-city'...but I can say with 100% confidence, the worst part of being poor is.....dealing with trashy poor people.

I live in a ~450 sq. ft. apartment in a crappy part of town.  I don't mind the size, and I don't mind that the dryer doesn't work and I have to hang my clothes to dry, or that I don't have a thermostat, or that my shower doesn't work or that water leaks onto the patio from above.

No, the only problem I have with being poor is dealing with trashy poor people.  Neighbors who use the outside of my wall as a basketball court, neighbors who play music until 2am because, apparently, they don't work.  I can't leave my bicycle (I don't own a car, so my bicycle is pretty important to my livelihood) outside because the trashy people that I live near will steal it.  I have to pre-plan deliveries and take personal time off work because if I don't, it will be stolen from my doorstep before I get home.

I'm willing to accept there are economic factors that make the accumulation of wealth unfair towards those who don't already have some....but the things that *really* SUCK about being poor are almost completely self-inflicted.

And this guy is dealing with it.  It sucks that police see him standing outside a building and harass him.  But, the community is better-off for it.  Poor people standing around doing nothing are just waiting to be poor people doing something wrong.  It's why I can't leave anything of value outside and why anything that doesn't move has been 'tagged' with spray paint.

Basically your choice is between being harassed by the police or being harassed by the poor guys standing around with nothing to do (the ones committing the crimes that make this guy conflicted over being stopped by the police.


Man.  You know, I don't live in the ghetto but I do live in the most affordable part of town.  There are people standing around with nothing to do all the time - the guy next door details cars and folks will just come in and end up hanging out with him for ages on the driveway.

But we've been here for a year and a half and are by FAR still the newest residents on the entire street.  The first time I drove a work car home, when a new roommate moved in, when that roommate got a new boyfriend... those neighbors standing around with nothing to do notice, and the guy next door will inevitably say "hey, so was that Suburban parked here last night yours?".

See, lots of folks on my street standing or walking and doing nothing... but most of them have lived here for decades, or their parents did before them.  The sewing circle gossip can get mildly irritating, but I also know if anything is amiss, they'll catch it.  And the kids in the neighborhood know if they do stupid shiat, they *will* get called out on it.  Probably by someone yelling at them from a porch.  I saw an awesome screaming fight when a teenaged girl threw a pop can into the creek. Ha.

We don't have a garage and keep garden tools, bikes, hell, the lawn mower, etc. all neatly stored behind the house.  Kids run through our backyard to get to the creek on the other side.  The SO had a cheap bike stolen when we first moved here (neighbor actually gave us one for free to replace it) and since then not a single thing taken.  And none of it locked up.

And I've never seen a cop roll through here except responding to a fight once and to block off the road during construction.

Yeah, it could be better.  But I had far sketchier shiat go down when I lived in the student section of town - even though the rent was twice (at best) what we pay now for smaller spaces.  Everyone here is generally scraping to make ends meet or retired, but they've been here for awhile and they plan to stay for awhile.   That makes all the difference in the world.
 
2013-03-11 07:51:31 PM
Stephen_Falken:  Screw you guys, I'm going to Europe once I finish my degree.

You almost had me but for that last like which went too over the top, I see you caught plenty tho.. good troll, would read again.
 
2013-03-11 08:24:39 PM

Magorn: KWillets: "if she hadn't come downstairs to identify him he would've been arrested on a trespassing charge."

So:

not arrested
not loitering

Anything else you'd care to share with us, subby?

According to the SCOTUS, the moment you are detained by police, and no longer able to freely leave on your own volition, an "arrest" has been made, no matter how  briefly,  this is why even "Terry Stops" aka "brief investigative detentions" require some objective reason and suspicion that you are engaged in wrongdoing.  Under Bloomberg, the NYPD has even abandonded this unbelievably basic level of probable cause and just begun blanket "stop and frisks" of random people in high crime neighborhoods.  The fact that this has only caused outrage from the ACLU and other "usual susoects" rather than mass protests and riots, or even the same level of press criticism that has attended his "soda ban" is a sad example fo how far this country, and NYC in particular, has fallen since 9/11


The cop smelled pot and saw the suspect throw something away when approached.
 
2013-03-11 08:31:42 PM
draletta.typepad.com
 
2013-03-11 09:06:57 PM

StoPPeRmobile: The cop smelled pot and saw the suspect throw something away when approached.


The black man pulled a wallet and had to be shot 52 times to make sure.

/Whats wrong with stopping to reload?
 
2013-03-12 09:55:21 AM

StaleCoffee: draypresct: StaleCoffee: Yeah, what a surprise, police states are more effective at stopping crime reporting.

You left a word off there.

No, police states really are more effective at stopping crime. Some people are willing to give up personal rights for that. Some people don't realize what they're doing, and some people don't care.

It's not surprising that constantly patrolling and arresting anyone on the streets after 9 PM means there are no criminals on the streets after 9 PM.


Most crime doesn't take place on the streets. A police state prevents accurate reporting from independent sources. A police state may dole out harsh punishments, but there is no incentive to make sure that the ones being punished actually committed any crimes. "Round up the usual suspects" . . . they tend to punish people with fewer friends in high places, regardless of whether they've committed a crime. They also tend to punish people who try to report crimes, since they make the local police look bad. Put these things together, and you see a situation where there is essentially no disincentive for large groups of people to commit most crimes (shooting a police officer may be one of the few exceptions), resulting in an increase in the crime rate.

Russia, North Korea, and a number of countries in Africa are police states. By your theory, they should have low crime rates. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_state

Want to know how they rank in terms of murder rates with the rest of the world (even just using _reported_ murder rates)? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicid e _rate

/tldr: Police state != lower crime.
 
2013-03-12 09:58:11 AM
My grandbaby can loiter, because he'd never menace any of the other residents.  It's all those other people's kids who should be arrested.  Idiots.
 
Displayed 23 of 123 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »





Report