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(Bubblews)   NASA admits there's only about a 3 day window to find and track asteroids passing close to Earth, like Asteroid 2013 EN, whizzing past the Moon today. Where's Harry Stamper when we need him most?   (bubblews.com) divider line 76
    More: Scary, moons, NASA, Earth  
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4311 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Mar 2013 at 3:19 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-10 05:44:30 PM
Well, our object collison budget's a million dollars. That allows us to track about 3% of the sky, and beg'n your pardon sir, but it's a big-ass sky.
 
2013-03-10 05:44:38 PM
Hey, if were wishing for an imaginary character to be real so they can deal with incoming asteroids, I'd rather have this guy around.

cache.io9.com
 
2013-03-10 05:48:29 PM

KarmicDisaster: mark12A: Seems to be a lot of Asteroids whizzing by lately. Wondering if some interstellar debris field is floating in from the Oort cloud...

The ones that we have seen lately have all been in stable orbits, not hyperbolic orbits falling in from outside the solar system, so no.


Comet  C/2013 A1 (the one that next year is supposed to get incredibly close to Mars -- or if we are really lucky, whack it head-on) is on a hyperbolic orbit, I think.
 
2013-03-10 06:16:28 PM

mark12A: Seems to be a lot of Asteroids whizzing by lately. Wondering if some interstellar debris field is floating in from the Oort cloud...


It's not that a lot of asteroids have been whizzing by insomuch as our detection efforts have gotten a lot better over the last few years.

In other words: Asteroids have ALWAYS been whizzing by, we just never noticed them before.
 
2013-03-10 06:20:40 PM

Ishkur: mark12A: Seems to be a lot of Asteroids whizzing by lately. Wondering if some interstellar debris field is floating in from the Oort cloud...

It's not that a lot of asteroids have been whizzing by insomuch as our detection efforts have gotten a lot better over the last few years.

In other words: Asteroids have ALWAYS been whizzing by, we just never noticed them before.


We noticed in 1908.
/If a fashion.
 
2013-03-10 06:21:25 PM

TheMysteriousStranger: We noticed in 1908.
/If a fashion.


In a fashion.

Sorry.
 
2013-03-10 06:28:50 PM

Myria: Just because we know how to find asteroids doesn't mean that they're more likely to hit Earth.  We've only had anything resembling this capability for some 400 years, and the last major impact was millions of years ago.  Being paranoid like this is a waste of worry.


Another asteroid WILL hit the earth... as happens regularly throughout history.  NOT planning for a doomsday event you know 100% will happen at some point would be foolish, from a species-wide perspective.

You personally, no, you can continue eating donuts in your executive office chair without wasting too much thought on it.
 
2013-03-10 06:31:53 PM
3 days notice isn't even enough time to prep a shuttle to intercept it.  Wait, we don't even have shuttles now?

i192.photobucket.com

Well, we're boned.
 
2013-03-10 06:40:11 PM

RectalDamage: Waste of money tracking these things. How often do cataclysmic size asteroids hit the earth?


You don't remember the last 3 times Earth was decimated by space rocks? You must be under 40 years old.

/It only takes one
 
2013-03-10 06:47:37 PM

PsyLord: 3 days notice isn't even enough time to prep a shuttle to intercept it.  Wait, we don't even have shuttles now?

[i192.photobucket.com image 450x334]

Well, we're boned.


Can we get Shuttles (or Shuttle Mk II) back if we file them as Defense/Homeland Security projects?

A manned spacecraft with ability to launch weapons to divert or destroy an asteroid would probably be more practical for National Defense than the F-35 Boondoggle will ever be, and a much better use of money.

impdb.org

What a Space Shuttle Mk II may look like.
 
2013-03-10 07:17:38 PM

Ishkur: Quantum Apostrophe: That's barely enough time to download and 3D print a planetary laser. Maybe we should get started now and 3D print ourselves a scrith foundation?

Yeah, because that's EXACTLY what everyone's saying 3D printing can do. You keep fighting that imaginary argument, you crazy diamond.


or 3D print ourselves some orange drink for the long journey home
 
2013-03-10 07:20:46 PM
If something is about to hit us, and there's nothing we can do about it, do you really want to know in advance?
 
2013-03-10 07:40:34 PM

PsyLord: 3 days notice isn't even enough time to prep a shuttle to intercept it.  Wait, we don't even have shuttles now?

[i192.photobucket.com image 450x334]

Well, we're boned.


Since when could Shuttles leave Earths orbit. We were boned as soon as we stopped building heavy lifters like the Saturn V. Had we kept building and updating the Apollo hardware (like the Russians did with Soyuz), we'd be in a lot better position overall because Saturns are a lot more flexible (you can either send a lot of payload into Earth orbit or a little bit much father away - imagine the kind of missions to the Jovian planets we could do with cheaper, more advanced Saturns as launch vehicles). Abandoning the Saturn I and V system for the boondoggle of the Shuttle was one of the worst mistakes NASA ever made.
 
2013-03-10 07:47:47 PM
FTA "Armageddon", the 1998 movie that predicted the future, right down to the first black president and the rise of Ben Affleck.

Movie trivia fail.
 
2013-03-10 08:01:43 PM

Mad_Radhu: PsyLord: 3 days notice isn't even enough time to prep a shuttle to intercept it.  Wait, we don't even have shuttles now?

[i192.photobucket.com image 450x334]

Well, we're boned.

Since when could Shuttles leave Earths orbit. We were boned as soon as we stopped building heavy lifters like the Saturn V. Had we kept building and updating the Apollo hardware (like the Russians did with Soyuz), we'd be in a lot better position overall because Saturns are a lot more flexible (you can either send a lot of payload into Earth orbit or a little bit much father away - imagine the kind of missions to the Jovian planets we could do with cheaper, more advanced Saturns as launch vehicles). Abandoning the Saturn I and V system for the boondoggle of the Shuttle was one of the worst mistakes NASA ever made.


But the Air Force needed a space plane capable of delivering satellites to useless orbits...
 
2013-03-10 08:02:18 PM
CBDR... constant bearing, decreasing range

/we'll only see it get brighter
 
2013-03-10 08:31:34 PM
I'd rather have this guy along. He gets shiat *done*.

www.zerosun.com
 
2013-03-10 09:04:52 PM

mincepie: FTA:  "Armageddon", the 1998 movie that predicted the future, right down to the first black president and the rise of Ben Affleck.

Movie trivia fail.


I was reading through these comments to see if anyone else caught this. Finally someone did!
 
2013-03-10 09:36:07 PM

SurelyShirley: So, if there are two asteroids closing in on earth at the same time, would they be called steroids?


I believe, in that situation, the proper term would be a "finger cuffs" event.
 
2013-03-10 09:54:33 PM

CokeBear: If something is about to hit us, and there's nothing we can do about it, do you really want to know in advance?


What if getting into an underground shelter meant surviving? It's not like you need food to outlast a Fallout situation, you just need to live through the blast and resulting shock wave.
 
2013-03-10 09:59:57 PM

scalpod: CokeBear: If something is about to hit us, and there's nothing we can do about it, do you really want to know in advance?

What if getting into an underground shelter meant surviving? It's not like you need food to outlast a Fallout situation, you just need to live through the blast and resulting shock wave.


Well, if the blast and shockwave are large enough, you'll need food for the Nuclear Winter when enough dust is kicked into the stratosphere to change the planetary albedo as Earth effectively gets covered by a giant dustcloud.  Reduced light causes a sharp drop in temperatures creating wintry conditions worldwide for anywhere from 6 months to several years depending on the severity.  The decreased temperature and light cause crop failures.

Without farms raising crops, for several years, the bulk of humanity starves to death.  Yeah, with plenty of cached food there will be enough survivors to ensure the continuation of humanity, and the continuity of government is even probable. . .but it would be a cataclysm the likes of which mankind had never seen before.  Seeing 5+ billion people die over the course of a couple of years from starvation is going to be bad.
 
2013-03-10 10:21:35 PM
Silverstaff:  Seeing 5+ billion people die over the course of a couple of years from starvation is going to be bad.

Pfft...never happen because it's not part of Jesus' plan.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Is it?
 
2013-03-10 10:48:06 PM

Lady Indica: traylor: [img689.imageshack.us image 379x214]

Well, imagine what would had happened if NASA (or an other agency) announced the Russian meteor 3 days in advance. The EVERYBODY PANIC effect could have caused a much bigger negative impact on everything than the meteor itself did. The fear and insecurity could shut down the society and bring anarchy, rape, and pillage to your otherwise normal life.

I get what you mean on one level (I live in CA, feel this way about quakes because we don't have to do a ton of stupid prep shiat like hurricane people) but...it IS a pretty dumb perspective. Advance warning where we have the ability to do SOMETHING is good.

You think Katrina would've been less of a clusterfark without warning?


That was sooo cute.
 
2013-03-11 12:47:20 AM

CokeBear: If something is about to hit us, and there's nothing we can do about it, do you really want to know in advance?


End of the world orgy, anyone?
 
2013-03-11 04:57:40 PM

BlippityBleep: and somehow we've made it this far!


The Optimist Fell ten stories,
and at each window bar-
he shouted to his friends inside: "It's alright so far!"

/not mine
//really old
///1914 book of collected poems inherited many years ago
////Slashies!
 
2013-03-11 08:41:05 PM

Silverstaff: scalpod: CokeBear: If something is about to hit us, and there's nothing we can do about it, do you really want to know in advance?

What if getting into an underground shelter meant surviving? It's not like you need food to outlast a Fallout situation, you just need to live through the blast and resulting shock wave.

Well, if the blast and shockwave are large enough, you'll need food for the Nuclear Winter when enough dust is kicked into the stratosphere to change the planetary albedo as Earth effectively gets covered by a giant dustcloud.  Reduced light causes a sharp drop in temperatures creating wintry conditions worldwide for anywhere from 6 months to several years depending on the severity.  The decreased temperature and light cause crop failures.

Without farms raising crops, for several years, the bulk of humanity starves to death.  Yeah, with plenty of cached food there will be enough survivors to ensure the continuation of humanity, and the continuity of government is even probable. . .but it would be a cataclysm the likes of which mankind had never seen before.  Seeing 5+ billion people die over the course of a couple of years from starvation is going to be bad.


I didn't mean mass extinction impacts or even "nation busters", just "city busters". Someone asked what good having any advance warning would do and I was suggesting that there could be times when "get into the nearest shelter" might not be useless advice.
 
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