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(Daily Mail)   Self-taught photographer Mike Brodie rode with America's impoverished youth for thousands of miles on freight trains. Beautiful images provide portrait of curious sub-culture which remains alive a century after it came to prominence   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 115
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21645 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Mar 2013 at 12:27 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-10 12:31:12 AM  
Wow.  those are some amazing images.

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2013-03-10 12:31:14 AM  
Gawd hates hobos
 
2013-03-10 12:36:06 AM  
Excellent stuff.

/in before the "you gotta have formal training" photo snobs
 
2013-03-10 12:37:40 AM  
Hipsters
 
2013-03-10 12:38:00 AM  
First: nice pictures

Second: "You point this at what you want to take a picture of and then press this button. Got it?"
 
2013-03-10 12:39:42 AM  
Authentic Steampunk™
 
2013-03-10 12:41:38 AM  
Some nice stuff there. Makes me want a hatful of blackberries. I imagine that after 10 years that he's probably gome some even better images. Likely we couldn't see those since they're going to be in the book / on exhibit. I'll bet those images are even better.
 
2013-03-10 12:43:41 AM  
FTFA: "Running from poverty or chasing their dreams, stunning photos show what life is like for America's train hoppers who, more than 100 years on from the Great Depression, are still in thrall to the country's railroads"

Somebody forgot to carry the "Are you farking innumerate?"
 
2013-03-10 12:44:00 AM  

encyclopediaplushuman: Authentic Steampunk™


Diesel's pretty punk.
 
2013-03-10 12:45:58 AM  
First pic is just south of Rincon on the coast in central Cal.
 
2013-03-10 12:46:16 AM  
Goddamn hipsters taking pictures of their hipster friends.

/anyone giving odds on how many "homeless" chicks this self-styled photographer banged?
 
2013-03-10 12:46:35 AM  
What's missing is the collection of crust punk heroin addicts giving blow jobs for bumps and being beat to death.
 
2013-03-10 12:51:06 AM  

styckx: What's missing is the collection of crust punk heroin addicts giving blow jobs for bumps and being beat to death.


I thought that was truck stop hookers.
 
2013-03-10 12:53:34 AM  

vicejay: Excellent stuff.

/in before the "you gotta have formal training" photo snobs


I found the whole "self taught" emphasis of the article odd. Photography is very much something you can self teach, so I hardly imagine that to be a rare thing.
 
2013-03-10 12:56:58 AM  
"self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.
 
2013-03-10 01:00:16 AM  
ricksflickspicks.animationblogspot.com
 
2013-03-10 01:00:26 AM  
For those that are interested in train people, I'll just leave this here
 
2013-03-10 01:01:34 AM  

ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.


5/10

All photographers are "self-taught". Also you don't need a DSLR to be a photographer - just a camera phone or point and shoot.
 
2013-03-10 01:06:58 AM  

ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.


Yet the man in this article has been published and you, you flail limply against an uncaring internet.
 
2013-03-10 01:07:40 AM  
andynz81:
I found the whole "self taught" emphasis of the article odd. Photography is very much something you can self teach, so I hardly imagine that to be a rare thing.

I think formal training is probably more important when you're shooting professional models, or you're shooting arty pictures like landscapes or whatever.  For this kind of photography, the important part is connecting with your subjects and getting them to act naturally in front of the camera.  If you do that well, you can pretty much take the shots on a iPhone and get results that are just as good.
 
2013-03-10 01:10:24 AM  
"Self-taught photographer" is in the same league as "self-taught masturbator"...as long as you have it pointed in the right direction, it's hard to fark it up.
 
2013-03-10 01:10:49 AM  

Elzar: ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.

5/10

All photographers are "self-taught". Also you don't need a DSLR to be a photographer - just a camera phone or point and shoot.


6/10
 
2013-03-10 01:12:32 AM  
During the depression people hopped trains going from town-to-town looking for work.

While current day train jumpers may travel from town-to-town, they don't do it looking for work.  They love the fact that they don't have jobs, that they support themselves by begging, picking through garbage, breaking into houses and gathering together to use drugs and drink. Unlike depression-era train jumpers who looked for work, modern train jumpers relish their "dropout" lifestyle, and there is no reason anyone should feel sorry for them.

I wish I could locate one of their web forums, where they share tips on breaking into houses, using drugs, and begging for food, but my Google skills are lacking tonight.
 
2013-03-10 01:16:09 AM  

phalamir: FTFA: "Running from poverty or chasing their dreams, stunning photos show what life is like for America's train hoppers who, more than 100 years on from the Great Depression, are still in thrall to the country's railroads"

Somebody forgot to carry the "Are you farking innumerate?"


Yeah, I saw that too. Whoever wrote the copy had it right in the first paragraph. Apparently, whoever put the pictures in didn't read the article; read their history books in junior high.
 
2013-03-10 01:23:48 AM  
These are NOT "poor impoverished" youth.  The name is the same for these as it was
back in the 30's.  Bums & hobo's.  These "poor" want this lifestyle.  No one is forcing this
on them.  If they wanted to work, you know there are jobs they could do, they just want to
freeload off the generosity of others.  You ever notice they always seem to have enough
money for cigarettes, booze, tattoos & drugs?
Sorry, not buying it....bums, nothing more.
 
2013-03-10 01:25:25 AM  
i.imgur.com

One of my all-time favorites from the Polaroid Kid.
 
2013-03-10 01:27:04 AM  

noitsnot: First pic is just south of Rincon on the coast in central Cal.


Looks more like just south of Santa Barbara, where the mudslides were a few years ago. I could be wrong though, I'm used to seeing that area from the 101.
 
2013-03-10 01:30:50 AM  
Running from poverty or chasing their dreams, stunning photos show what life is like for America's train hoppers who, more than 100 years on from the Great Depression, are still in thrall to the country's railroads

I was unaware that so much time had passed.
 
2013-03-10 01:38:22 AM  
Meh.

Those were decent.

Think I'll name my next kid 'Soup'.
 
2013-03-10 01:43:09 AM  

Lokasenna: Running from poverty or chasing their dreams, stunning photos show what life is like for America's train hoppers who, more than 100 years on from the Great Depression, are still in thrall to the country's railroads

I was unaware that so much time had passed.


Indeed -- the 2030's really caught me by surprise too.  And here I thought it was still 2013....
 
2013-03-10 01:45:52 AM  
www.wearysloth.com
 
2013-03-10 01:45:56 AM  

Dmala: andynz81:
I found the whole "self taught" emphasis of the article odd. Photography is very much something you can self teach, so I hardly imagine that to be a rare thing.

I think formal training is probably more important when you're shooting professional models, or you're shooting arty pictures like landscapes or whatever.  For this kind of photography, the important part is connecting with your subjects and getting them to act naturally in front of the camera.  If you do that well, you can pretty much take the shots on a iPhone and get results that are just as good.


ehhh I wasn't going to go quite that far (there are limitations with point and shoots that irk me to the point that I don't use them)... or I guess my point was that everything that can be taught in a course in photography, you can pretty much learn yourself (although a course will give you access to sweet hardware). When I got my first SLR I loved learning and understanding everything that my camera and the various accessories could do - and in a way the learning never stops. The post processing, well courses might teach you a good workflow for that but again, there are fantastic (and free) resources out there on photoshop etc.

I definitely agree than in certain situations the most crucial talent is your ability to empathise and make someone at ease with what you're doing.
 
2013-03-10 01:47:42 AM  

ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.


And how do you know that this photographer is not using the camera to its fullest capacity?  And what capacity does his camera have?
 
2013-03-10 01:50:30 AM  

Elzar: All photographers are "self-taught". Also you don't need a DSLR to be a photographer - just a camera phone or point and shoot.


i.imm.io

Composing what's in the frame is only part of the battle. The word "photography" literally means drawing with light. And to do so you have to have some control over how that camera sees that light, which means exposure, shutter speed, and depth of field. And you don't get those out of a typical cellphone camera.

OTOH a skilled photographer can understand the limits of a more primitive device and work within its capacities to make good pictures.
 
2013-03-10 01:51:37 AM  

Elegy: For those that are interested in train people, I'll just leave this here


Nice documentary. Liked it somewhat. Good find.
 
2013-03-10 01:59:09 AM  
What I learned today.  You need a degree to take farking good photos, You need money to buy the proper equipment to take farking good photos.  You need dedication, tenacitity and a sixth sense to be where a good photo is at regardless of the previously mentioned tidbits.
 
2013-03-10 03:00:57 AM  
I haven't hopped a train since the mid-90's, but I have a few friends who still travel by rail.  Shiat like this is what fills the rails with newbs like the poor kids who got crushed by a stack of steel I beams last week.  Maybe I'm just a grumpy old house punk now, but it really bugs me out to see how many kids are hopping these days.
 
2013-03-10 03:12:54 AM  

Mock26: ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.

And how do you know that this photographer is not using the camera to its fullest capacity?  And what capacity does his camera have?


One of the methods by which a true photographer uses his camera to its fullest capacity is by manipulating shutter speed, etc.  This guy may or may not be doing that.  He also may or may not be developing the photos himself, which is another way to get the full expressiveness out of a shot.
 
2013-03-10 03:15:45 AM  
Elzar: All photographers are "self-taught". Also you don't need a DSLR to be a photographer - just a camera phone or point and shoot.

an eye for composition can utilize any equipment; a camera and instagram don't mean shiat
 
2013-03-10 03:31:26 AM  

ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.


As someone who had enough experience to run a darkroom in college but who needed a degree that would make money I'd like to call BS.

I had 3 community college classes in HS and published photographs under my belt still it was still hell trying to get into a proper photo class as a non major. I ended up running that darkroom because it was the only one on campus not exclusively for art majors, and I spent so much time there they just started paying me.

Granted I am somewhat leery of people who can afford a decent digital suddenly Photographers but as long as you're serious and especially if you find mentors you can DAMN well be a Photographer without a degree proper.
 
2013-03-10 03:37:28 AM  
Here's the deal. Photography is a highly intuitive activity, the products of which are drawn mainly from the photographer utilizing his or her perspective of the subject to create an image to evoke the emotions, thoughts, and imaginations of the viewer.

Yeah, equipment is important for a certain standard of photo. The higher-quality your rig is, the sharper your image is going to be, and there is more room to play with the environmental situations such as low light, bright light, etc. This guy is using a Nikon F3, which is a film SLR camera. Once someone has shown you the ropes or you find your own resource on how to manipulate shutter speed, aperture, and ASA on a film SLR, the rest of it is up to you and your own creative abilities and imagination.

He's taking photos straight from the heart of what he's looking at and is passionate about, and he's got the technique down for his chosen camera. He's got a good grasp of composition of his chosen subject and how to maximize the effect of what he's looking at. That's 90% of the battle.
 
2013-03-10 03:41:22 AM  

Left-Handed Spatula: Here's the deal. Photography is a highly intuitive activity, the products of which are drawn mainly from the photographer utilizing his or her perspective of the subject to create an image to evoke the emotions, thoughts, and imaginations of the viewer.

Yeah, equipment is important for a certain standard of photo. The higher-quality your rig is, the sharper your image is going to be, and there is more room to play with the environmental situations such as low light, bright light, etc. This guy is using a Nikon F3, which is a film SLR camera. Once someone has shown you the ropes or you find your own resource on how to manipulate shutter speed, aperture, and ASA on a film SLR, the rest of it is up to you and your own creative abilities and imagination.

He's taking photos straight from the heart of what he's looking at and is passionate about, and he's got the technique down for his chosen camera. He's got a good grasp of composition of his chosen subject and how to maximize the effect of what he's looking at. That's 90% of the battle.


And he still didn't show us any dirty hippie nipples.
 
2013-03-10 03:44:43 AM  
Self-taught photographer?

Is that like a self-taught toilet-flusher?

/Sorry, kids; photography is not an art. It's what you do if you like pretty things that you are incapable of representing by some medium that requires talent...
 
2013-03-10 03:48:07 AM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Granted I am somewhat leery of people who can afford a decent digital suddenly Photographers but as long as you're serious and especially if you find mentors you can DAMN well be a Photographer without a degree proper.


I kind of fell into it. The wife bought a Canon T3i two years ago.  Before that, I never took anything more complicated than my little Olympus point and shoot could do.  But, she figured we lived in Europe and were traveling all over, so we should have decent pictures.  Being a geek, I couldn't just leave it on auto.  I decided to try and master it.

Next thing you know, I'm scouring professional photographers' websites, learning post editing in Lightroom and Photoshop, upgrading lenses, then the camera, buying lighting kits and experimenting with the kids...  It was really just a fun distraction that morphed into an obsession.  Recently, someone at my wife's command saw my pictures when they came over to my house, and asked me to shoot official command functions, and my wife's best friend is asking me to shoot her wedding.  

It's weird, but for once my obsessive personality actually seems to have paid off.  I figure it's either this, or I go back to World of Warcraft.  At least with this, we get something productive out of it in the form of pretty pictures.

/still don't consider myself a professional, but very much an amateur
//but people like my work enough to pay for it, so I won't argue
 
2013-03-10 03:50:00 AM  
Oh, I was going to make another point in that second bit. Whatever type of camera you're using, be it SLR, DSLR, point-and-shoot, phone, film, digital, whatever, your own ability to manipulate an image out of it is most of the battle. Higher-quality or more complex equipment will give you more flexibility in yielding the desired results; but however expensive or complex it may be, if you're not putting all your effort into it, that won't mean a damn thing.
 
2013-03-10 03:51:47 AM  

ParagonComplex: "self-taught photographer" is never in the same league as one with an actual degree. At the very least a degree shows dedication to the craft instead of picking up a camera, misusing it (not using it to its fullest capacity is the same), and snapping pictures.


Never heard of Herb Ritts have you?
 
2013-03-10 03:54:23 AM  

Shadowknight: my little Olympus point and shoot


Just curious, what type of Oly P&S did you have? I got started in digital photography with an Olympus Stylus 800, and it won a few awards for me and really kick-started my passion to a new level. It was a trusty little thing; I took it out in all sorts of weather, including the middle of an ice storm, and it was just the best little P7S of its time ever. Despite advances in the last several years since it was manufactured, it's still pretty awesome and ahead of the times.
 
2013-03-10 03:59:56 AM  

Left-Handed Spatula: Just curious, what type of Oly P&S did you have?


I think it was along the lines of a T-100.  Just a cheap, 12 megapixel thing the size of a deck of cards.  Still have it in a drawer somewhere, but it's been replaced by the iPod's really quite amazing camera. It's all I really wanted at the time, really.  I had no interest in anything more complex until the wife brought home the T3i.  Which, let me tell you, is a GREAT starter camera.  Hell, I still use it as my secondary/backup.  Keep a wide angle on it and use the 5D III for portraits and macro.
 
2013-03-10 04:17:08 AM  
Nice pics, but the person who wrote the article needs to be pimp-slapped.
 
2013-03-10 04:23:57 AM  
 
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