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(Gothamist)   You want to see the handwritten ultimatum Jack Kerouac sent his publisher of "On The Road"? Well, here it is on a postcard   (gothamist.com) divider line 35
    More: Interesting, Jack Kerouac, postcards, Allen Ginsberg, advance copy  
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5785 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Mar 2013 at 4:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-08 04:24:30 PM
I sat there fingers popping as Dean, father Dean, mystic Dean, Dean with his angry denim jeans taking in the breathing purple groan of Manhattan with the grim grey soft clouds blanketing the city as young lovers ducked in to escape October's gentle insistent rain drip drop dripping, brimming the black grey ribbons criss crossing the city. Dean. Proud Dean. like the deathless ones his shield being cloud and thunder and smoke, dancing bebop merengue rhythms in clubs shouting "go man go" as I danced imagining crazy notes scattering like starlings at dawn. Pink dawn, her fingers peeling back wine dark skies rumbling into the gaze of the Sun, waiting for Dean. Old Dean, the father we never found, who dreamed the day into being.
 
2013-03-08 04:28:43 PM
He didn't write so much as ramble endlessly.
 
2013-03-08 04:31:54 PM
This only convinces me more that you have to be a little crazy to be a great author.

I once saw James Michener give a talk and he said if you didn't wear glasses by the time you were 18 you would never be a good author because that meant you weren't reading enough, but I think he was wrong. You just have to be a certain kind of lunatic.
 
2013-03-08 04:41:10 PM

rickythepenguin: I sat there fingers popping as Dean, father Dean, mystic Dean, Dean with his angry denim jeans taking in the breathing purple groan of Manhattan with the grim grey soft clouds blanketing the city as young lovers ducked in to escape October's gentle insistent rain drip drop dripping, brimming the black grey ribbons criss crossing the city. Dean. Proud Dean. like the deathless ones his shield being cloud and thunder and smoke, dancing bebop merengue rhythms in clubs shouting "go man go" as I danced imagining crazy notes scattering like starlings at dawn. Pink dawn, her fingers peeling back wine dark skies rumbling into the gaze of the Sun, waiting for Dean. Old Dean, the father we never found, who dreamed the day into being.


I'm guessing that textual diarrhea is an excerpt from one of his "books"?
 
2013-03-08 04:41:16 PM

rickythepenguin: I sat there fingers popping as Dean, father Dean, mystic Dean, Dean with his angry denim jeans taking in the breathing purple groan of Manhattan with the grim grey soft clouds blanketing the city as young lovers ducked in to escape October's gentle insistent rain drip drop dripping, brimming the black grey ribbons criss crossing the city. Dean. Proud Dean. like the deathless ones his shield being cloud and thunder and smoke, dancing bebop merengue rhythms in clubs shouting "go man go" as I danced imagining crazy notes scattering like starlings at dawn. Pink dawn, her fingers peeling back wine dark skies rumbling into the gaze of the Sun, waiting for Dean. Old Dean, the father we never found, who dreamed the day into being.


Somebodyhastostarttheslowsnap dot jpg
 
2013-03-08 04:50:04 PM

taurusowner: rickythepenguin: I sat there fingers popping as Dean, father Dean, mystic Dean, Dean with his angry denim jeans taking in the breathing purple groan of Manhattan with the grim grey soft clouds blanketing the city as young lovers ducked in to escape October's gentle insistent rain drip drop dripping, brimming the black grey ribbons criss crossing the city. Dean. Proud Dean. like the deathless ones his shield being cloud and thunder and smoke, dancing bebop merengue rhythms in clubs shouting "go man go" as I danced imagining crazy notes scattering like starlings at dawn. Pink dawn, her fingers peeling back wine dark skies rumbling into the gaze of the Sun, waiting for Dean. Old Dean, the father we never found, who dreamed the day into being.

I'm guessing that textual diarrhea is an excerpt from one of his "books"?



It's great poetry. It's not all that good as a running narrative, though. And it was never as deep as the beat generation thought it was. But that said, it's a shiatload better than the words spewed forth by most modern musicians and a great number of extra-famous writers today.

Kerouac ain't my cup of tea, but I'd rather read him than that Twilight crap any day.
 
2013-03-08 04:57:27 PM
ZeroCorpse - the quote button doesn't seem to be working but...your statement isn't saying much. I would rather read randomly selected words strung together in an epic run-on sentence that spans as many pages as the Twilight books than Twilight.
 
2013-03-08 05:00:33 PM

taurusowner: rickythepenguin: I sat there fingers popping as Dean, father Dean, mystic Dean, Dean with his angry denim jeans taking in the breathing purple groan of Manhattan with the grim grey soft clouds blanketing the city as young lovers ducked in to escape October's gentle insistent rain drip drop dripping, brimming the black grey ribbons criss crossing the city. Dean. Proud Dean. like the deathless ones his shield being cloud and thunder and smoke, dancing bebop merengue rhythms in clubs shouting "go man go" as I danced imagining crazy notes scattering like starlings at dawn. Pink dawn, her fingers peeling back wine dark skies rumbling into the gaze of the Sun, waiting for Dean. Old Dean, the father we never found, who dreamed the day into being.

I'm guessing that textual diarrhea is an excerpt from one of his "books"?


From On the Road.  You have to be young, dumb and impressionable to really get into that book.  Read it as a teen and devoured it.... at middleage, just could not get into it.
 
2013-03-08 05:50:44 PM
Durrr...when did new paperback editions start costing less than Kindle versions from Amazon?

/ignorant
 
2013-03-08 05:53:15 PM
read it as a teen, loved it. read again, 30 years later- still loved it, but for entirely different reasons
 
2013-03-08 05:58:17 PM
I think about his mother.
 
2013-03-08 06:30:19 PM

bmckenna: ZeroCorpse - the quote button doesn't seem to be working but...your statement isn't saying much. I would rather read randomly selected words strung together in an epic run-on sentence that spans as many pages as the Twilight books than Twilight.


Granted.
 
2013-03-08 06:58:41 PM
Saiga410:From On the Road.  You have to be young, dumb and impressionable to really get into that book.  Read it as a teen and devoured it.... at middleage, just could not get into it.

In all fairness, it's about as good as you can expect a prose book from someone famous for their poetry to be.  Also, if you have trouble connecting to it as an adult, might I suggest more drugs?  Take up cigars and brandy, if you insist on being a square about it.
 
2013-03-08 07:29:22 PM
 
2013-03-08 07:42:26 PM
I liked it as a teenager, but as has been said, you approach the crest of the actuarial hill, and it loses its appeal. There are some moments of genius in it, but as a narrative it's tortuous. Age does change your tastes. I got around to opening my wife's copy of Pride and Prejudice, and I have to say, it's brilliantly written and very engaging.

/Favorite book is still Catch-22.
//My dream woman is Nately's whore.
 
2013-03-08 07:48:39 PM
Saiga410:
From On the Road.  You have to be young, dumb and impressionable to really get into that book.  Read it as a teen and devoured it.... at middleage, just could not get into it.

I tried to read it about three years ago.  I didn't make it very far.
 
2013-03-08 08:04:28 PM
On the Road was heavier on the homosexual overtones than Twilight.
 
2013-03-08 08:50:40 PM

Happy Hours: This only convinces me more that you have to be a little crazy to be a great author.


Yeah, but we're talking about Kerouac.  The publisher should have told him to fark off and published a good author.

r1niceboy: I got around to opening my wife's copy of Pride and Prejudice, and I have to say, it's brilliantly written and very engaging.


Isn't it though?  Kind of amazing how Austen still makes you give a damn about fictional 2-century old dinner parties.
 
2013-03-08 08:58:18 PM
So my only choices are Kerouac or Twilight? Oh how I wish there were more than 2 books.
 
2013-03-08 09:15:54 PM
Got nothing on Pratchett
 
2013-03-08 10:19:39 PM
Is this the thread where a bunch of cubicle jockeys who can't write a coherent sentence prattle on and on about what a shiatty writer Jack Kerouac was?
i18.photobucket.com
Yep, it's that thread again.
 
2013-03-08 10:33:11 PM

jso2897: prattle


prattle is a curmudgeon's word
/idle chatter ... meaninglessly, of course
 
2013-03-08 11:38:06 PM
From TFA: "Automatic writing is fine for a start, but it has to be revised and put into shape or people will quite properly refuse to read it-and what you need now is to be read, not to be exhibited as a sort of natural phenomenon like [the] Old Faithful geyser that sends up a jet of steam and mud every hour on the hour."

He was right.

//Also, "Lonesome Traveler" is a magnificent book and deserves more fame than farking "On The Road".
 
2013-03-08 11:54:51 PM

AlwaysRightBoy: jso2897: prattle

prattle is a curmudgeon's word
/idle chatter ... meaninglessly, of course


And I am a curmudgeon. Problem?
Talk about whether Kerouac was a "good" writer is about as meaningful as talk about whether Bob Dylan is a "good" singer, or Andy Warhol a "good" painter. When you change artistic history, you don't have to be some pedant's idea of "good".
 
2013-03-09 12:39:15 AM

jso2897: AlwaysRightBoy: jso2897: prattle

prattle is a curmudgeon's word
/idle chatter ... meaninglessly, of course

And I am a curmudgeon. Problem?
Talk about whether Kerouac was a "good" writer is about as meaningful as talk about whether Bob Dylan is a "good" singer, or Andy Warhol a "good" painter. When you change artistic history, you don't have to be some pedant's idea of "good".


I have no problem, cumudgeon too.  Bobby D. was was a great songwriter, Andy knew  how to direct people with his visions.

/product of his and many others visions
 
2013-03-09 12:48:54 AM
unreadable nonsense.

http://www.mediafire.com/?tuj7cjf3oq3oooi

picture's worth a thousand words anyway
 
2013-03-09 01:17:08 AM
That's not writing, it's scribbling.
 
2013-03-09 02:58:13 AM
Kerouac is like reading Hunter S. Thompson, without Thompson's Awesome Quotient.
 
2013-03-09 06:49:41 AM

AlwaysRightBoy: jso2897: AlwaysRightBoy: jso2897: prattle

prattle is a curmudgeon's word
/idle chatter ... meaninglessly, of course

And I am a curmudgeon. Problem?
Talk about whether Kerouac was a "good" writer is about as meaningful as talk about whether Bob Dylan is a "good" singer, or Andy Warhol a "good" painter. When you change artistic history, you don't have to be some pedant's idea of "good".

I have no problem, cumudgeon too.  Bobby D. was was a great songwriter, Andy knew  how to direct people with his visions.

/product of his and many others visions


Well, riht - I wasn't saying that you guys are WRONG. Just that being in the right place at the right time with the right thing is often more important than talent.
Of course, to be fair, Kerouac is not quite as untalented as he is portrayed by his detractors - for one thing, he is most famous for his worst book.
 
2013-03-09 11:11:07 AM
I prefer Victor Hugo's more succinct approach.  He wrote to his publisher and wanted to know how Les Miserables was selling.  The entire message: "?".

It was doing well, so the publisher wrote back, "!".
 
2013-03-09 11:49:38 AM

LewDux: http://acrossanunderwood.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/blame-these-4-me n -for-the-beatnik-horror.jpg


THE BEATNIK HORROR

This fine upstanding tabloid tried to warn us.
 
2013-03-09 05:30:33 PM

Gough: I prefer Victor Hugo's more succinct approach.  He wrote to his publisher and wanted to know how Les Miserables was selling.  The entire message: "?".

It was doing well, so the publisher wrote back, "!".


Telegrams from France to London are expensive, yo.
 
2013-03-09 09:13:51 PM
So you're saying his editor had a point?
 
2013-03-10 09:11:56 AM
The "scroll version" with everyone's real name and everything uncensored is pretty great. But yeah "on the road" loses its appeal as you get older, as it did for Kerouac.

One thing I wonder is if Neal really was as charming as he is made out to be during those days. I saw Ken Keasy's Intrepid traveler movies and thought Cassady sounded and behaved nuts. Just an old alcoholic speed freak rapping on about trite bullshiat.
 
2013-03-10 11:53:57 AM

Mopofdeath: I saw Ken Keasy's Intrepid traveler movies and thought Cassady sounded and behaved nuts. Just an old alcoholic speed freak rapping on about trite bullshiat.



yeah, but by then he was roughly 15 years past the OTR era, and in his about.....mid to late 50s?  jerry garcia and bob weir told stories about how even in 67-68 he did some pretty amazing things.

crazy to think that casady was a link between kerouac and the grateful dead.
 
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