If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CBS New York)   80% of recent NYC high school graduates cannot read. Somehow they're still active on Facebook and Youtube   (newyork.cbslocal.com) divider line 146
    More: Obvious, high schools in New York City, high schools, basic skills, City University, Marcia Kramer  
•       •       •

6667 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Mar 2013 at 10:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



146 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-08 12:40:56 PM

namegoeshere: Still expensive, but not nearly as expensive as private colleges.


It is a shame too, it used to be a lot cheaper.

/SUNY Alfred alumni
 
2013-03-08 12:45:33 PM

FuzzyPinkMatrix: factoryconnection: So is it actually 80% of NYCPHS graduates that can't make CUNY-spec reading muster, or 80% of those "in a special remedial program at the Borough of Manhattan Community College [that] couldn't make the grade."  If it is 80% of the aggregate, then why bring up the special program in the first place?

I mean, it is sad to think that a HS graduate couldn't read at a college level, but the headline makes it sound like "80% illiteracy" which no one that has ever observed teenagers on the internet would... doubt, actually.

It's also pointless without knowing (a) what percentage of NYCPHS grads wind up at CUNY community colleges and (b) how that percentage of students needing remedial work compares with other community colleges in other parts of the country.

/then again NYC is the world
//I read that on the internet once
///or maybe every day


My argument is this: If you need to take remedial classes in college, you don't belong in college. Going to college only requires a 6th-grade reading level and math level. If you can't even do 6th-grde level work, you are just not cut out for academic work, and are wasting everyone's time and money.
 
2013-03-08 12:49:37 PM

genepool lifeboat: namegoeshere: Still expensive, but not nearly as expensive as private colleges.

It is a shame too, it used to be a lot cheaper.

/SUNY Alfred alumni


Isn't that the truth.

/Potsdam
 
2013-03-08 12:50:02 PM

MyRandomName: Teachers dont make enough. Charter schools suck. More money. Self esteem is more important than achievement.

Did I cover all the idiotic left talking points?


You forgot to blame Bush. 4/5 though.
 
2013-03-08 12:57:40 PM
Three cheers for gubment education!

I love how so many yanks bag on the South for being "backward", all the while their kids can't read or write.
 
2013-03-08 12:59:30 PM
Bloomberg should ban illiteracy.
 
2013-03-08 01:12:55 PM
People who were educated in new york city schools have been illiterate since at least the 1950s.  This is not new.
 
2013-03-08 01:28:13 PM
Facebook and YouTube comments are proof undeniable that you don't need to be able to read or spell to use them.

Facebook and YouTube comments undeniably prove that one doesn't need to be able to read or spell to use them.
-or-
Facebook and YouTube comments that prove that one does not need to be able to read or spell to use them cannot be denied.

FIFY

/GOML

/still agree with this sentiment in principle.
 
2013-03-08 01:31:12 PM

spentmiles: PumpkinCake: My husband's father's wife came to our house for Christmas, as she generally has been doing for a couple years now.  She's a public school counselor for troubled high schools and spends weekends in Juvie with the kids, so she sees a bunch of stuff.

Now, this last Christmas she and her husband went on this half hour long rant about how every homeschool kid they have ever seen has been behind in academics and socially retarded.  Just on and on (I am in charge of schooling our kids, and I can go into great detail about which curriculums we use, which charter schools we have been a part of, and which social activities we participate in. I have a BA and have published a book, and am working on a couple more, as has my husband. We're not messing around).  I don't really care what these two think: they have their lives, and we see them on birthdays sometimes (we never invited them to Christmas, they just told us they were coming one year).

And then I see stories like this, and I wonder what on earth she was smoking.  Sure, there are some homeschoolers who go off into religious bunny trails, but most of the families I know still have to take the STAR tests and we're all kickin ass and taking names.

Just venting. Hate that woman.
/seriously...in *my house* with *my family* at *Christmas*

I know!  Seriously pisses me off when people berate homeschooling!

I see that you went the "self-study" approach to your education, which is great and will probably work for you.  But as someone who has a Harvard PhD in developmental studies, I feel as though I taught my children better than any formal school every could have - private, charter, public, you name it.  I don't believe in the STAR test model, but I'm sure my children would set the bar if I offered it to them as an enrichment exercise.

My DS Ricky is an accomplished violinist whom I'm sending to Greece in the summer to study the cultural effects of economic austerity measures.  He is a wonderful boy, though ne ...


I think I love you.
 
2013-03-08 01:35:30 PM

HelloNeuman: Molavian: Giltric: I guess their teachers weren't getting paid enough.

right guys?

Well, obviously.  If you pay them more they do a better job.

THIS! Clearly everyone should be paid the same since pay has no impact on anything. My CEO completely agrees.

troll scoring 4/10 (minus 1 for direct solicitation)


I wasn't sure if I should throw something about unions in there, too.
 
2013-03-08 01:49:13 PM
I guess I'll be the one to ask if there's anything wrong with this.  Is there anything wrong with this?

College is supposed to be too hard for most of the population, and if everyone applies for college, the majority of kids shouldn't make the grade, even at the prerequisite level.  If most people can't qualify for admission to a public university, then most people shouldn't be able to handle a first-year CC courseload.

I would suggest that the problem isn't necessarily a poor K-12 system, but a generation obsessed with going to college when at least half of them shouldn't even consider it.
 
2013-03-08 01:50:01 PM

spentmiles: PumpkinCake: My husband's father's wife came to our house for Christmas, as she generally has been doing for a couple years now.  She's a public school counselor for troubled high schools and spends weekends in Juvie with the kids, so she sees a bunch of stuff.

Now, this last Christmas she and her husband went on this half hour long rant about how every homeschool kid they have ever seen has been behind in academics and socially retarded.  Just on and on (I am in charge of schooling our kids, and I can go into great detail about which curriculums we use, which charter schools we have been a part of, and which social activities we participate in. I have a BA and have published a book, and am working on a couple more, as has my husband. We're not messing around).  I don't really care what these two think: they have their lives, and we see them on birthdays sometimes (we never invited them to Christmas, they just told us they were coming one year).

And then I see stories like this, and I wonder what on earth she was smoking.  Sure, there are some homeschoolers who go off into religious bunny trails, but most of the families I know still have to take the STAR tests and we're all kickin ass and taking names.

Just venting. Hate that woman.
/seriously...in *my house* with *my family* at *Christmas*

I know!  Seriously pisses me off when people berate homeschooling!

I see that you went the "self-study" approach to your education, which is great and will probably work for you.  But as someone who has a Harvard PhD in developmental studies, I feel as though I taught my children better than any formal school every could have - private, charter, public, you name it.  I don't believe in the STAR test model, but I'm sure my children would set the bar if I offered it to them as an enrichment exercise.

My DS Ricky is an accomplished violinist whom I'm sending to Greece in the summer to study the cultural effects of economic austerity measures.  He is a wonderful boy, though ne ...


Reminds me of that episode of the X-Files.  You know the one I'm talking about.
 
2013-03-08 01:51:27 PM
This kind of shiat is so stupid. Face it old people- kids these days are MORE LITERATE than they were in the 'good old days' of the 1900s or whatever you wish America was. I can understand 99% of youtube comments. People are writing MORE than they ever have before because it is easier.

This headline is also wildly inaccurate as many have pointed out. The headline makes it sound like 100% of new york high school graduates go to community college.
No.
Some go to other colleges, some go to this specific community college (and of that group, 80% need remedial help), and some don't go to college.
 

So, uh, who can't read now?
 
2013-03-08 01:58:15 PM

Xcott: I guess I'll be the one to ask if there's anything wrong with this.  Is there anything wrong with this?

College is supposed to be too hard for most of the population, and if everyone applies for college, the majority of kids shouldn't make the grade, even at the prerequisite level.  If most people can't qualify for admission to a public university, then most people shouldn't be able to handle a first-year CC courseload.

I would suggest that the problem isn't necessarily a poor K-12 system, but a generation obsessed with going to college when at least half of them shouldn't even consider it.


Though most people who visit a Walmart and sees their customer base would agree with your assessment of the average person, I don't think we are allowed to make that suggestion out loud.
 
2013-03-08 01:59:44 PM

Xcott: I guess I'll be the one to ask if there's anything wrong with this.  Is there anything wrong with this?

College is supposed to be too hard for most of the population, and if everyone applies for college, the majority of kids shouldn't make the grade, even at the prerequisite level.  If most people can't qualify for admission to a public university, then most people shouldn't be able to handle a first-year CC courseload.

I would suggest that the problem isn't necessarily a poor K-12 system, but a generation obsessed with going to college when at least half of them shouldn't even consider it.


Yea. Exactly. They didn't tell us how many of these kids were going to community college. Why are they going there? Will it even benefit them?? I would say 9/10 of my coworkers would not be able to do a basic math problem with fractions (without a calculator). I mean, sure it'd be easy for them to learn and they were certainly taught that in school, but clearly they don't REALLY need to know.

Communication skills are important, but seriously writing perfect sentences is not that important. 80% of the work I do is international and I'm working with people who speak English as a second (or third or fourth) language- if you think they would notice how great my style is when I write them a technical explanation of something you are crazy.
 
2013-03-08 02:07:22 PM

spidermilk: This kind of shiat is so stupid. Face it old people- kids these days are MORE LITERATE than they were in the 'good old days' of the 1900s or whatever you wish America was.


Are you trolling?  By pretty much any standard of literacy, today's graduates are worse off than graduates from 1960.  Professors have to amend their course load due to the fact that today's students can't read as many pages per hour as previous generations.

That doesn't mean that they're dumber, however.  They may have access to more information and be better able to find what they need---they just aren't as practiced at the specific skills that we characterize as "literacy."
 
2013-03-08 02:07:27 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-08 02:09:23 PM
100% of reporter doesn't understand basic descriptive stats. 

The way this is written it seems like they are trying to intentionally obfuscate the number.   The real number here is 80% of the graduates WHO WENT TO THIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE needed remedial studies.  Now, how well that describes the remaining 95% of the student body remains to be seen, but it's pretty meaningless on it's own.
 
2013-03-08 02:09:24 PM

Xcott: I would suggest that the problem isn't necessarily a poor K-12 system, but a generation obsessed with going to college when at least half of them shouldn't even consider it.


Society has been telling kids for years that "if you want to be successful, you NEED to go to college."  When, in fact, this isn't true at all.  Some people do need it, depending on what they want to accomplish.

I went to college for Electrical Engineering and ended up landing a job in IT where I advanced through OJT. I could have easily gotten here with just a high school diploma

My step brother has an IQ 2 points below bean dip, but you can throw a motor in front of him and he can take it apart and put it together with his eyes closed. Would he do well in college?  Hell no.  Is he successful?  Yes, at his given skill set.
.
 
2013-03-08 02:12:15 PM
80% of the children in NYC public schools are fresh off the boat. Big shock they arent doing so well on exams when this is the first time they've seen electricity and indoor plumbing.
 
2013-03-08 02:18:04 PM

ModernLuddite: I bet they can read Spanish just fine!


You would think so, but no. Speak, yeah, to a degree, at least the Spanish version of Ebonics  Read and write? not as much.  I had many many classmates in school, from places like DR, PR, etc, fail Spanish class because they couldn't write down their own conversations.
 
2013-03-08 02:23:13 PM

Xcott: I guess I'll be the one to ask if there's anything wrong with this.  Is there anything wrong with this?

College is supposed to be too hard for most of the population, and if everyone applies for college, the majority of kids shouldn't make the grade, even at the prerequisite level.  If most people can't qualify for admission to a public university, then most people shouldn't be able to handle a first-year CC courseload.

I would suggest that the problem isn't necessarily a poor K-12 system, but a generation obsessed with going to college when at least half of them shouldn't even consider it.


Well said.
 
2013-03-08 02:50:07 PM

LemSkroob: 80% of the children in NYC public schools are fresh off the boat. Big shock they arent doing so well on exams when this is the first time they've seen electricity and indoor plumbing.


i1019.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-08 03:07:49 PM

LemSkroob: ModernLuddite: I bet they can read Spanish just fine!

You would think so, but no. Speak, yeah, to a degree, at least the Spanish version of Ebonics  Read and write? not as much.  I had many many classmates in school, from places like DR, PR, etc, fail Spanish class because they couldn't write down their own conversations.


A Chicano friend of mine grew up here in Los Angeles speaking Spanish as his first language and English as his second (which he learned when he entered elementary school).  He admits that he can't spell several words in Spanish; he's only heard them, never read them.  His English skills, however, are above average despite it being his second language.
 
2013-03-08 03:08:36 PM

KrispyKritter: thank 'no child left behind' for this bullshiat. mixing in the morans with those that have the possibility at a future doesn't help either. if you don't have the basics+ down pat you shouldn't be tossing money at a college.

i was in the work world a long time. met way too many spectacular idiots with college degrees. yes there are lots of very intelligent college graduates too. they are the rare ones and are usually a pleasure to converse with.


Yup, No Child Left Behind is a Republican attempt to destroy public education.  It seems to be working.
 
2013-03-08 03:17:51 PM
If they can't read or do math why does this dumb college admit them?


oh, right, student aid and butts in seats.

carry on.
 
2013-03-08 03:32:56 PM

genepool lifeboat: Society has been telling kids for years that "if you want to be successful, you NEED to go to college."

 
CSB:  my security class teaches buffer overrun exploitation and stack-smashing.  In a good year, I assign the students to hijack a buggy program with a return-to-libc attack, although this is a challenge as lab computers become progressively immune to it.

One year, a CS professor came by my office and asked, "what the Hell are you teaching my kids?  I'm trying to teach them a recursive algorithm, and one of them said, 'but prof Xcott said recursion is a security flaw!'"  RECORD SCRATCH.  Apparently some kid utterly failed to understand stack-smashing, but he was still able to make the vague connection that recursion-->function call-->stack-->something bad.
 The lesson:  there's always a bottom segment of the class who not only fails to learn, but actually picks up a dramatically false version of what you say.  They come out of an engineering class worse off, because they have learned anti-facts.  So we hear that "society" is telling these kids they need to go to college, and I am inclined to ask:  how do we really know they're really being told this?   Maybe they're being told something far more nuanced and sensible, and then they look up from their Facebook feed and think, "I missed that, but it was something about, like, 'go to college.'"
 
2013-03-08 03:39:51 PM

Xcott:  there's always a bottom segment of the class who not only fails to learn, but actually picks up a dramatically false version of what you say.  They come out of an engineering class worse off, because they have learned anti-facts.  So we hear that "society" is telling these kids they need to go to college, and I am inclined to ask:  how do we really know they're really being told this?   Maybe they're being told something far more nuanced and sensible, and then they look up from their Facebook feed and think, "I missed that, but it was something about, like, 'go to college.'"


This happens in physics all the time.  Some kids won't "get" 95% of the material in the course and then go on to misunderstand/misconstrue the remaining 5%.
 
2013-03-08 03:47:47 PM
I think it's important to make a distinction between being able to, say, read Twilight, and being able to read a NYT article and argue against / for its points

so you can be able to read without being literate.

//teaches in a CUNY
 
2013-03-08 04:03:06 PM

aesirx: I think it's important to make a distinction between being able to, say, read Twilight, and being able to read a NYT article and argue against / for its points


Just look at all the people who read The Hunger Games and then got upset that the movie portrayed Rue as black.
 
2013-03-08 04:17:13 PM

VGA Hole: AgentBang: This is one of the primary reasons why I doubt we'll continue to raise our child here once she starts going to school. Unless I hit it big and can afford a public school.

NYC schools, damn you scary.

I don't understand. Public schools are free here in NY state. If they're charging you, that's farked up.

It's really a cultural thing, and a part of a bigger problem. Because its seen as "free" and "obligatory", people of all classes and creeds are taking it for granted. For the rich, since its "free" it's too crappy for their snowflakes, so they'll spend $20k/semester to send then to Andover or something, write off that expense, complain that they still have to pay property taxes for schools their kids dont go to, and try to defund the crap out of it. For the elderly, yeah they went to those schools and got an education and were made the better for it, but now they have a fixed income, and "times are different"*, so they'll vote against every tax measure to sustain it. For the young and their parents, "them teachers" never treated them right and didn't see how amazing they were, and kept insisting they do homework and read and learn maths and stuff that's just stupid because you don't need to know that shiat if you work in the mill or hustle or whatever. Teachers just be all up in their faces and whatever, because I rent an apartment, so I don't have to pay for this... But if there's a snow day and I gotta call my aunt to watch the kids so I can get to my shift at the salon/temp agency/McD's, oh hell no.

Education is not free, or obligatory. It's a valuable investment in society and an opportunity for their members. This is where we build our community's foundations and our futures. If you want to fix our country, start looking at our schools. The more people with a proper education we have, the better things will work across the board. When we get around to remembering that, maybe this will be fixed.

*I've learned that this is a catch-all phrase old pe ...


FizixJunkee: LemSkroob: ModernLuddite: I bet they can read Spanish just fine!

You would think so, but no. Speak, yeah, to a degree, at least the Spanish version of Ebonics  Read and write? not as much.  I had many many classmates in school, from places like DR, PR, etc, fail Spanish class because they couldn't write down their own conversations.

A Chicano friend of mine grew up here in Los Angeles speaking Spanish as his first language and English as his second (which he learned when he entered elementary school).  He admits that he can't spell several words in Spanish; he's only heard them, never read them.  His English skills, however, are above average despite it being his second language.


A buddy grew up in NYC and only learned English in the 2nd grade when the teachers put a stop to it (mid 80s).  He sounds like a Beastie Boy when he speaks English and is still fluent in Spanish speech but never has learned proper written Spanish.  It was weird to hear a white Nu Yawker give a dissertation on Dr. Dre, then turn to the waitress and order dinner in perfect Spanish.  Speaking a language doesn't mean you are literate in the language.
 
2013-03-08 04:29:13 PM
Yay something else for all the "STEM" neckbeards on Fark to feel superior about.
 
2013-03-08 05:05:00 PM

LemSkroob: 80% of the children in NYC public schools are fresh off the boat. Big shock they arent doing so well on exams when this is the first time they've seen electricity and indoor plumbing.


Um, what?  Americans have the craziest ideas about what life in the rest of the world is like.

Officials told CBS 2′s Kramer that nearly 80 percent of those who graduate from city high schools arrived at City University's community college system without having mastered the skills to do college-level work.

OK, so the headline was total bullshiat, no surprise. If he could read the HS grad wouldn't be in community college to start with.
 
2013-03-08 05:36:23 PM

genepool lifeboat: My step brother has an IQ 2 points below bean dip, but you can throw a motor in front of him and he can take it apart and put it together with his eyes closed. Would he do well in college?  Hell no.  Is he successful?  Yes, at his given skill set.
.

Does he also like eating "french-fried taters", mmmhmmm?
 
2013-03-08 07:37:38 PM

Xcott: genepool lifeboat: Society has been telling kids for years that "if you want to be successful, you NEED to go to college."
 
CSB:  my security class teaches buffer overrun exploitation and stack-smashing.  In a good year, I assign the students to hijack a buggy program with a return-to-libc attack, although this is a challenge as lab computers become progressively immune to it.

One year, a CS professor came by my office and asked, "what the Hell are you teaching my kids?  I'm trying to teach them a recursive algorithm, and one of them said, 'but prof Xcott said recursion is a security flaw!'"  RECORD SCRATCH.  Apparently some kid utterly failed to understand stack-smashing, but he was still able to make the vague connection that recursion-->function call-->stack-->something bad.
 The lesson:  there's always a bottom segment of the class who not only fails to learn, but actually picks up a dramatically false version of what you say.  They come out of an engineering class worse off, because they have learned anti-facts.  So we hear that "society" is telling these kids they need to go to college, and I am inclined to ask:  how do we really know they're really being told this?   Maybe they're being told something far more nuanced and sensible, and then they look up from their Facebook feed and think, "I missed that, but it was something about, like, 'go to college.'"


Yeah, this. It's really quite something, and it's not just kids who do it. I have had people repeat back to me things that I have supposedly said that were completely farking different from what I actually said and then expected me to explain it. Not idiots (necessarily). College-educated people. Many people don't farking listen. Or they only hear the bits they want to pay attention to, like that old Far Side comic about What Dogs Hear.
 
2013-03-08 07:55:34 PM

NightOwl2255: PumpkinCake: NightOwl2255: AgentBang: This is one of the primary reasons why I doubt we'll continue to raise our child here once she starts going to school. Unless I hit it big and can afford a public school.

NYC schools, damn you scary.

Just don't home school.


You need to homeschool.

AgentBang: NightOwl2255: AgentBang: This is one of the primary reasons why I doubt we'll continue to raise our child here once she starts going to school. Unless I hit it big and can afford a public school.

NYC schools, damn you scary.

Just don't home school.

Hell no. As much as it would break my heart, I'd rather move then my wife and I trying to home-school. We like to think we're smart, but that's what teachers are for. My experience with teaching is el-zilcho, so I'm only good enough to help with homework.

Looks like my "joke" fell flat. I have nothing against homeschooling. Every home-schooled child I know is doing very well, if not better, then non-home-schooled kids.
I was tying to make a small joke about this line "Unless I hit it big and can afford a public school." Which I assumed was a mistake and intended to say private, not public, school.


The home schooled kids I knew were academically okay in most subjects, but went on to have bat-shiat crazy trainwreck lives because they were raised in isolation by religious wackos that basically brainwashed them with the crazy and stunted their emotional and social development.

That being said, I don't take issue with every part of the homeschooling idea. I think homeschooling kids when they are younger, if you are not insane and a religious nutjob trying to make sure society doesn't contaminate the perfect god-bot you're trying to build is probably okay, as long as you are still finding ways for them to socialize with other children, through sports and hobbies and allow them to have friends.
 
2013-03-08 08:10:32 PM
Lol public schooling.....keep trying, libs
 
2013-03-08 08:14:06 PM

mentula: this is absolute, 100% pure rubbish. the ones entering CUNY community colleges need remedial help. the ones entering, say, ivy league schools, not so much.

part of the endless rightwing/media narrative bashing teachers in general and public education in particular.

full disclosure: i teach in a private school




You're a teacher? I really hope you don't teach English.
 
2013-03-08 08:18:39 PM
I live nowhere near New York, but can attest to the fact of kids being unable to read and write clearly.  My 13 year old stepson, bless his sweet lil heart, is less literate than I was at age 8 or 9 and I was no prodigy by any stretch of the term.  We make him write his own grocery lists and he's taken to drawing pictures (hieroglyphics, I call them) because we've had to ask him so many times what the fark he's asking for.  I've tried to encourage him to read, everything from Harry Potter to the Hunger Games to Ender's Game and on down the list, but he refuses.  Nothing but video games in his spare time.  His English scores are good, however, and seeing as how I've read some of his "writing" assignments, have surmised he is a victim of No Child Left Behind or perhaps just bad mid western genes.  His dad's not much better; never cracks a book but can decipher schematics of a furnace like he's channeling another power or something.  Both father and son are quite bright, but as a constant reader, (probably with more books than brains, truth be told) I weep for the future of humanity.  Only hope the kid gets into the military, or something in math, because his English skills are teh failz.
 
2013-03-08 10:05:14 PM
The day parents began protesting homework was the day our education system completely shiat the bed.
 
2013-03-08 11:41:18 PM
Makes perfect sense to me. Bloomberg knows the best way to build and maintain a fascist state is to make sure your peasan... err "citizens" are as uneducated as possible.
 
2013-03-09 01:36:42 AM
The way I figure it, politics shouldn't figure into this.  The kids can't read yet they're allowed to graduate high school.  Whoever allowed this should be fired.  if they don't meet the standards for being promoted to the next grade, don't promote them.  This alone should keep them from graduating until they can read.

The people of New York have teachers unions and their cronies in city hall for this situation.  New York public schools are also known for not being able to fire teachers.  They have teachers who have molested kids yet can't be fired.  On every day school is in session, they go to an office where they sit on their asses all day, watch tv, or whatever and get paid for it.
 
2013-03-09 08:20:02 AM
The national average for HS students entering college is that 60% need remedial math to start the college curriculum. Our remedial program starts at 6th grade math, and we have students flunking that class in record numbers.

/public university math tutor
 
2013-03-09 09:54:21 AM

Macular Degenerate: The national average for HS students entering college is that 60% need remedial math to start the college curriculum. Our remedial program starts at 6th grade math, and we have students flunking that class in record numbers.

/public university math tutor


CSB: got a 33 on the math portion of the ACT. Still placed into remedial math at a state university that accepted anyone over with a score over 19.

/TI-89 ftw
 
2013-03-09 11:51:50 AM

Xcott: aesirx: I think it's important to make a distinction between being able to, say, read Twilight, and being able to read a NYT article and argue against / for its points

Just look at all the people who read The Hunger Games and then got upset that the movie portrayed Rue as black.


That was a thing?

People campaign against the weirdest crap sometimes.
 
2013-03-11 12:10:46 AM

keypusher: LemSkroob: 80% of the children in NYC public schools are fresh off the boat. Big shock they arent doing so well on exams when this is the first time they've seen electricity and indoor plumbing.

Um, what?  Americans have the craziest ideas about what life in the rest of the world is like.


I've been to China, India, Pakistan, Ukraine, DR, PR, Haiti, Mexio, etc. I've seen what the rest of the world is like, and its a nightmare.
 
Displayed 46 of 146 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report