If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Electronista)   BlackBerry's BB10 devices arrive just in time for sequester spending cuts, and the US military decides to save a few million by only considering Android and iOS devices for its needs   (electronista.com) divider line 27
    More: Sad, BlackBerry, Android  
•       •       •

1049 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Mar 2013 at 10:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-03-08 04:34:34 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-08 05:09:01 AM
You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.
 
2013-03-08 10:42:27 AM

Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.


If you've already spent the money on testing Apple and Android, and you have a clear route your security certifications already mapped out, then of course you can consider it.  With the new cuts, there's not enough money to test new devices.  Sorry BB.
 
2013-03-08 10:42:46 AM
....and years from now, the analysts will blame the sequester cuts for RIMs demise.
 
2013-03-08 10:51:37 AM

Sasquach: ....and years from now, the analysts will blame the sequester cuts for RIMs demise.


Only Monday morning analysts.
 
2013-03-08 11:06:04 AM

Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.


The 90s called and asked for its tired meme back.
 
2013-03-08 11:10:58 AM

gingerjet: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

The 90s called and asked for its tired meme back.


No one was talking about Apple in the 90s.
 
2013-03-08 11:11:14 AM

Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.


Carrier plans for BB cost an extra $10 per device per month to connect to corporate email through RIM's network.  Using an Apple device and native connectivity to corporate email (ActiveSync, etc.) costs $0 per device per month.  So there's $120 savings right there.
 
2013-03-08 11:28:52 AM

valkore: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

Carrier plans for BB cost an extra $10 per device per month to connect to corporate email through RIM's network.  Using an Apple device and native connectivity to corporate email (ActiveSync, etc.) costs $0 per device per month.  So there's $120 savings right there.


Apple devices don't have end to end encryption like BB does.

Who needs encryption in the military? What could go wrong?
 
2013-03-08 11:48:24 AM

valkore: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

Carrier plans for BB cost an extra $10 per device per month to connect to corporate email through RIM's network.  Using an Apple device and native connectivity to corporate email (ActiveSync, etc.) costs $0 per device per month.  So there's $120 savings right there.


There's a bit of a corollary to this: Microsoft recently raised per-user license fees, but not device fees. Their supposed line of reasoning was making the device fees more attractive, knowing that businesses will be connecting more and more devices.
 
2013-03-08 11:53:07 AM
Why did it take a month for this story to get green lit?
 
2013-03-08 11:57:06 AM

Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.


I've got a iMac in 2006 that I payed $1100 for and today it is still my main computer and it still works exactly the same as it did when I unboxed it.  I've not even had to reinstall the OS or any of the software on it or purchase any hardware upgrades.

How many shiatty Dell or Acer laptops has the average consumer gone through since 2006?

I could tell you about the mountains of asset retirements I've done at work on all the leaking capacitor Dells Optiplexes we've had to dumpster that were purchased in 2007 and 2009.  These were $800-$1100 machines.
 
2013-03-08 12:04:11 PM

theurge14: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

I've got a iMac in 2006 that I payed $1100 for and today it is still my main computer and it still works exactly the same as it did when I unboxed it.  I've not even had to reinstall the OS or any of the software on it or purchase any hardware upgrades.

How many shiatty Dell or Acer laptops has the average consumer gone through since 2006?

I could tell you about the mountains of asset retirements I've done at work on all the leaking capacitor Dells Optiplexes we've had to dumpster that were purchased in 2007 and 2009.  These were $800-$1100 machines.


Wait. Optiplex is a type of Dell server? FFS, our company just had to get a server from a 3rd party, they supply Optiplex servers, and I just assumed it was their name for something they made.

Uh oh. Damn you brain, why didn't you Google it?! Jeez, you let down your guard for one second and let someone else handle something, and the next thing you know you have Dell stuff in your office.
 
2013-03-08 12:12:27 PM
The sequester doesn't really impact this choice, it's all about market share.  BB is clearly on the way out, they just don't have the customer base anymore.  People used to have a BB and a cell phone, now they just have a smart phone.
 
2013-03-08 12:56:24 PM

Slaxl: Wait. Optiplex is a type of Dell server? FFS, our company just had to get a server from a 3rd party, they supply Optiplex servers, and I just assumed it was their name for something they made.


I'm generally no huge fan of Dell, but better that than a 3rd party one-off frankenserver with no history and little to no support, other than for individual components.  Consider yourself lucky.
 
2013-03-08 12:57:26 PM
Given that 80% of mobile malware runs on Android, that sounds like a bad choice for the military.
 
2013-03-08 01:09:53 PM

Slaxl: Wait. Optiplex is a type of Dell server?


The Optiplex series is as close to deserving the title "server" as your mom is to "unspoiled virgin".  They are low-rent desktops in various form factors, nothing more.
 
2013-03-08 01:22:04 PM
Just means your average government worker will continue to use a phone that's 10 years behind the times.  If anything, that's Blackberry's target demographic.
 
2013-03-08 01:48:52 PM

Slaxl: theurge14: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

I've got a iMac in 2006 that I payed $1100 for and today it is still my main computer and it still works exactly the same as it did when I unboxed it.  I've not even had to reinstall the OS or any of the software on it or purchase any hardware upgrades.

How many shiatty Dell or Acer laptops has the average consumer gone through since 2006?

I could tell you about the mountains of asset retirements I've done at work on all the leaking capacitor Dells Optiplexes we've had to dumpster that were purchased in 2007 and 2009.  These were $800-$1100 machines.

Wait. Optiplex is a type of Dell server? FFS, our company just had to get a server from a 3rd party, they supply Optiplex servers, and I just assumed it was their name for something they made.

Uh oh. Damn you brain, why didn't you Google it?! Jeez, you let down your guard for one second and let someone else handle something, and the next thing you know you have Dell stuff in your office.


Optiplex are a line of workstations, not servers.  We've got everything from old GX270s to the latest 3010s.
 
2013-03-08 02:25:39 PM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: The sequester doesn't really impact this choice, it's all about market share. BB is clearly on the way out, they just don't have the customer base anymore. People used to have a BB and a cell phone, now they just have a smart phone.


BB has been the mobile communication device of choice for the Government since the beginning because of the inherent end-to-end encryption on email and the seamless (from the user's perspective) integration with MS Exchange servers. The Government does not care about customer base -- they ARE the customer base for RIM and always have been. The Government even mandated full smartcard-enabled enterprise encryption on top of the inherent BB encryption, and RIM delivered.

But the sequester WILL impact this choice -- it already has. We just culled 50% of the blackberries from our organization. We'll see if RIM can handle a much slower and lower refresh rate on the million-plus handsets the US government has bought, in the face of shrinking consumer demand.

My money is on Android over iOS, because Apple refuses to release a feature phone, and the Government is not going to pay $700 per handset for the newest smartphones anyway. There are plenty of low-cost Android phones that can accommodate enterprise encryption, read Adobe and Office files in their native format, and even make phone calls. The only question in my mind is reliability and platform stability -- BB has Android beat by a mile on this one.
 
2013-03-08 02:26:38 PM

theurge14: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

I've got a iMac in 2006 that I payed $1100 for and today it is still my main computer and it still works exactly the same as it did when I unboxed it.  I've not even had to reinstall the OS or any of the software on it or purchase any hardware upgrades.

How many shiatty Dell or Acer laptops has the average consumer gone through since 2006?

I could tell you about the mountains of asset retirements I've done at work on all the leaking capacitor Dells Optiplexes we've had to dumpster that were purchased in 2007 and 2009.  These were $800-$1100 machines.


I own several fully functional Windows computers (of various manufacturers, including home builds) dating from 2001 or so.  I don't use them because they are wildly obsolete, but they still work.

Plus, everybody, including Apple, was affected by the bad capacitor problem.  (Specific Apple models affected were the iMac G5 and the eMac.)
 
2013-03-08 03:00:49 PM

StrikitRich: Why did it take a month for this story to get green lit?


Sequester cuts.  Fark.gov had to cut back on mods.
 
2013-03-08 04:54:03 PM

Stabone33: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: The sequester doesn't really impact this choice, it's all about market share. BB is clearly on the way out, they just don't have the customer base anymore. People used to have a BB and a cell phone, now they just have a smart phone.

BB has been the mobile communication device of choice for the Government since the beginning because of the inherent end-to-end encryption on email and the seamless (from the user's perspective) integration with MS Exchange servers. The Government does not care about customer base -- they ARE the customer base for RIM and always have been. The Government even mandated full smartcard-enabled enterprise encryption on top of the inherent BB encryption, and RIM delivered.

But the sequester WILL impact this choice -- it already has. We just culled 50% of the blackberries from our organization. We'll see if RIM can handle a much slower and lower refresh rate on the million-plus handsets the US government has bought, in the face of shrinking consumer demand.

My money is on Android over iOS, because Apple refuses to release a feature phone, and the Government is not going to pay $700 per handset for the newest smartphones anyway. There are plenty of low-cost Android phones that can accommodate enterprise encryption, read Adobe and Office files in their native format, and even make phone calls. The only question in my mind is reliability and platform stability -- BB has Android beat by a mile on this one.


Shouldn't an iPhone be just as secure as a BlackBerry? Exchange can encrypt the email when sending it via Activesync just as good as a BES can, and you can apply IRM to control confidential emails being forwarded. As far as device security goes, iPhone encryption is too strong for the NSA to hack, and you can use something like Mobile Iron for MDM to force security policies. Outside of some unfortunate iOS6 Exchange sync bugs, a properly configured iPhone should theoretically be as secure as a BB, unless they have an extra security feature I'm not aware of.
 
2013-03-08 07:36:58 PM

Stabone33: My money is on Android over iOS, because Apple refuses to release a feature phone, and the Government is not going to pay $700 per handset for the newest smartphones anyway. There are plenty of low-cost Android phones that can accommodate enterprise encryption, read Adobe and Office files in their native format, and even make phone calls. The only question in my mind is reliability and platform stability -- BB has Android beat by a mile on this one.


A big part of BB's security was that they were more centrally controlled than other phones of their time.  Most Fandroids tout the fact that they can easily customize Android, sideload software from anywhere, etc. And F-Secure just reported that 79% of mobile malware in 2012, and 96% of mobile malware in the last quarter of the year, was for Android.  The DoD is going to think long and hard about that, unless they can seriously tighten the screws on whatever devices they get.

I prefer Android to Windows Phone, but folks I know at Microsoft are watching and waiting for Android's lax approach to security to manifest itself in a big enough way that people's faith in the platform suffers - they figure it's the only chance they have to be anything more than an also-ran at this point.  (The article doesn't say, or I didn't see, whether Windows Phone is being evaluated by DoD, but honestly if they were going to evaluate more than the top two platforms, I'd sooner see them go with a domestically-produced OS than one made by a bunch of poutine-eating socialists anyway.)
 
2013-03-09 07:18:44 AM

lohphat: Apple devices don't have end to end encryption like BB does.

Who needs encryption in the military? What could go wrong?


So you are saying that a VPN or Certificate validation are less secure than throwing all your emails though SOMEONE ELSE'S NETWORK?
 
2013-03-09 06:34:10 PM

The Dynamite Monkey: lohphat: Apple devices don't have end to end encryption like BB does.

Who needs encryption in the military? What could go wrong?

So you are saying that a VPN or Certificate validation are less secure than throwing all your emails though SOMEONE ELSE'S NETWORK?


Depending on if you're using BES vs BIS, all emails are encrypted so the path is irrelevant -- oh and by the way, the Internet is by definition: SOMEONE ELSE'S NETWORKS.
 
2013-03-11 05:47:21 PM

Nexzus: valkore: Slaxl: You don't save money by considering Apple stuff.

Carrier plans for BB cost an extra $10 per device per month to connect to corporate email through RIM's network.  Using an Apple device and native connectivity to corporate email (ActiveSync, etc.) costs $0 per device per month.  So there's $120 savings right there.

There's a bit of a corollary to this: Microsoft recently raised per-user license fees, but not device fees. Their supposed line of reasoning was making the device fees more attractive, knowing that businesses will be connecting more and more devices.


BB10 can use active sync now. So....
 
Displayed 27 of 27 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report