If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(National Geographic)   In Soviet Russia, dogs domesticate you   (news.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 28
    More: Interesting, Soviet Russia, 48 contiguous states, Dutton, Nicaragua, dogs  
•       •       •

7870 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Mar 2013 at 11:03 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-03-08 11:06:25 AM
I thought that phrase was filtervated.
 
2013-03-08 11:14:43 AM

Old_Chief_Scott: I thought that phrase was filtervated.


Only in comments.  Any idea why?
 
2013-03-08 11:16:48 AM

JohnAnnArbor: Only in comments. Any idea why?


Been that way for a long long time now. Drew hates the damn thing.
 
2013-03-08 11:17:26 AM

JohnAnnArbor: Only in comments. Any idea why?


Because it was beat to death some years back.
 
2013-03-08 11:21:38 AM
I'm reading The Genius of Dogs right now, so I'll be getting a kick out of the replies, once they start focusing on the actual article and not the headline.
 
2013-03-08 11:21:50 AM
Another "just so" story

FTFA: "Most likely, it was wolves that approached us, not the other way around, probably while they were scavenging around garbage dumps on the edge of human settlements. The wolves that were bold but aggressive would have been killed by humans, and so only the ones that were bold and friendly would have been tolerated. "

So dogs domesticated humans but it was done by the humans killing dogs.

Please site the studies where dogs kill the humans that don't make good "masters".
 
2013-03-08 11:22:56 AM

SBinRR: I'm reading The Genius of Dogs right now, so I'll be getting a kick out of the replies, once they start focusing on the actual article and not the headline.


In certain place, article focuses on you.
 
2013-03-08 11:25:29 AM
 
2013-03-08 11:27:20 AM
I think the truth is somewhere in the middle. The thesis that dogs come from humans stealing wolf pups never made a lot of sense. Why would the wolf pups stay, and why would the humans want them? The counter thesis that dogs come from wolves who joined early hunters is closer to the truth, but not all of it.

I think mutually benefit is by far the simpler explanation. Wolves cleaned up after humans and then started following them around. Eventually, bold wolves started hunting along side humans, and were rewarded by sharing in the spoils and getting to sit by the fire. Less bold wolves stayed behind. There's your split.

The traits we see in dogs (protection, hunting) clearly have a basis in wolf-behaviour, but the desire for human affection and companionship is clearly a dog thing and not a wolf thing. We just gave the wolves who had this latent trait a reason to discover their hidden proto-dog nature. The we bred that trait selectively for 15,000 years.
 
2013-03-08 11:30:09 AM

SBinRR: I'm reading The Genius of Dogs right now, so I'll be getting a kick out of the replies, once they start focusing on the actual article and not the headline.


I for one really don't have anything to say about the headline but I did find the article an interesting idea, whether it is correct or not.
 
2013-03-08 11:30:58 AM
This explains why my dogs demand me to walk them in the morning, no matter at what time I wake up.

/Seriously
//The wait for me to get up
///And I must do it, otherwise they'll be cranky all day
 
2013-03-08 11:33:48 AM
dogs are brilliant and knew one day the couch and steak would be theirs, all theirs.
 
2013-03-08 11:35:10 AM

KrispyKritter: dogs are brilliant and knew one day the couch and steak would be theirs, all theirs.


All that stood in their way were their one and only enemy: Cats.
 
2013-03-08 11:36:09 AM
On a serious note I thought this was already sorted out. Domesticated dogs have a specific gene marker that wolves do not and when wolves have that gene marker removed they behave a lot like domesticated dogs. So the theory is that wolves developed this marker as a response to following the packs of hunter gather humans. We go where the food is, wolves tag a long making it easier for them to find live prey and also feed on the scraps we leave behind.

Eventually over time a symbiotic relationship began to form where the dog/wolf started to pick up actions that help both parties. Guardian the camp for instance from either rival humans or other carnivores for instance.
 
2013-03-08 11:36:13 AM
i49.tinypic.com
 
2013-03-08 11:41:39 AM

old_toole: SBinRR: I'm reading The Genius of Dogs right now, so I'll be getting a kick out of the replies, once they start focusing on the actual article and not the headline.

I for one really don't have anything to say about the headline but I did find the article an interesting idea, whether it is correct or not.


It has been an interesting book to read so far.  The author is very open when presenting many of the theories in saying that some are controversial, some aren't accepted by all researchers, and some experiments have not been replicated by others.  So, you get a good idea of what stuff is widely accepted and what stuff needs more research.
 
2013-03-08 12:03:41 PM

Warchild: JohnAnnArbor: Only in comments. Any idea why?

Because it was beat to death some years back.


In the country formerly known as the Soviet Union, phrases beat YOU to death.
 
2013-03-08 12:14:27 PM
Wasn't there an article posted to the Geek tab just yesterday, describing how a species of fox on the Falkland Islands that was exterminated, because it was so idiotically friendly and unafraid to approach humans?

So you're saying primitive hunter-gatherers were more humane to friendly animals than 17th century British explorers?  Not bloody likely.
 
2013-03-08 12:20:55 PM
The short version is that we often think of evolution as being the survival of the fittest, where the strong and the dominant survive and the soft and weak perish

If that was true, we'd be constantly plagued with lions and tigers and bears (oh my) instead of mice, insects and bacteria/viruses.

And if you're going to use the Sov-Russia meme in your headline about dog domestication, you should at least link to an article that talks about the long running Russian experiments with silver foxes. http://en.wikip edia.org/wiki/Domesticated_silver_fox
 
2013-03-08 12:27:47 PM

Parthenogenetic: [heavy Russian accent]

, happy tree paint Bob Ross!  Ki.  Ross-ki.

[/heavy Russian accent]


In Sovi*t Russia, you catch filter.  *derp*
 
2013-03-08 12:29:59 PM
Russia has become a live action version of Dwarf Fortress.
 
2013-03-08 01:33:47 PM

MyKingdomForYourHorse: JohnAnnArbor: Only in comments. Any idea why?

Been that way for a long long time now. Drew hates the damn thing.


He'll get over it.
 
2013-03-08 01:35:59 PM

december: the desire for human affection and companionship is clearly a dog thing and not a wolf thing.


I don't know that this a totally reasonable assertion. Lot of animals desire human companionship, its just that ones encountered in the wild are cautious or fearful of unfamiliar humans.

Developing a relationship with a *cute* wolf pup, after killing it's aggressively, protective mother makes a lot of sense to me. Adult wild dogs aren't exactly known for being real into human affection and companionship either.
 
2013-03-08 01:44:24 PM

Parthenogenetic: Wasn't there an article posted to the Geek tab just yesterday, describing how a species of fox on the Falkland Islands that was exterminated, because it was so idiotically friendly and unafraid to approach humans?

So you're saying primitive hunter-gatherers were more humane to friendly animals than 17th century British explorers?  Not bloody likely.


there's some big differences.  A geographically isolated species that has no fear of predators is easily killed off (see: dodo bird). Widespread species that has a fear of predators but intelligent enough to differentiate between individuals and know how to approach the less aggressive ones - less likely to be exterminated.
 
2013-03-08 03:43:34 PM

MyKingdomForYourHorse: JohnAnnArbor: Only in comments. Any idea why?

Been that way for a long long time now. Drew hates the damn thing.



I hate it because it's wrong. The original Yakov Smirnov bit said, "In Soviet Union..." Now, granted, when he did his bit, that particular country still existed, but since Russia is no longer Soviet, it make little sense to say it that way.
 
2013-03-08 09:41:05 PM

Pawprint: MyKingdomForYourHorse: JohnAnnArbor: Only in comments. Any idea why?

Been that way for a long long time now. Drew hates the damn thing.


I hate it because it's wrong. The original Yakov Smirnov bit said, "In Soviet Union..." Now, granted, when he did his bit, that particular country still existed, but since Russia is no longer Soviet, it make little sense to say it that way.


When the legend becomes fact, print the legend. -John Ford
When the legend becomes meme, post the meme. -me
 
2013-03-08 11:18:42 PM

ShabazKilla: [i49.tinypic.com image 454x604]


awwww. you've got me missing my girl, RIP. we just adopted a 2 yr old Chow Pei who has brought the happiness back to our heart-broken home. great guy, buff color like your friend in the pic, soft as a bunny.
 
2013-03-09 12:23:34 AM
i14.photobucket.com
 
Displayed 28 of 28 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »





Report