Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Tesla Motors)   Let a few Tesla owners give you their impressions of the Model S after a few thousand miles   (teslamotors.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, cup holders  
•       •       •

4826 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Mar 2013 at 8:59 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



112 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-08 01:29:06 AM  
WANT
WANT BAD
 
2013-03-08 04:37:32 AM  
I'd really like the Tesla X. That would cover all of my automotive needs, in all seasons.
 
2013-03-08 07:08:56 AM  
Cool technology, but the cars are put together like it was done by a high school shop class. The interiors are especially bad.
 
2013-03-08 07:29:24 AM  
Glad they are happy, but the guy from Texas is gonna regret selling his other cars when he has to go further than 200 miles...you know, almost anywhere else.
 
2013-03-08 08:24:59 AM  
I'd like to have one of these to stick in the back of my SUV in case I run out of gas.
 
2013-03-08 08:36:18 AM  

Popcorn Johnny: Cool technology, but the cars are put together like it was done by a high school shop class. The interiors are especially bad.


image.motortrend.com

I'm not sure if this is it, I just googled it and this was a result, but I dunno, It's not too bad. Bit of a shame it looks just like a giant iPad in the centre, but I don't think there were a lot of options available. Getting touch panels shaped specifically to fit the contours and flow of the general dash might be a bit too expensive.
 
2013-03-08 08:57:33 AM  
I can't wait for them to integrate the teleforce anti-theft system. Just like it's inventor intended

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-03-08 08:58:49 AM  
Tesla doesn't exist north of New York. My EVER getting one of these living in New England is nonexistent.
 
2013-03-08 09:13:20 AM  
Not bad. I'd rather buy 2 BMWs for the same price, but still damn impressive if you can afford one
 
2013-03-08 09:13:30 AM  
My garage has in it a '96 911 Carrera 4 and an '08 M5.


img508.imageshack.us

Also, I have to be at the gym in 26 minutes.
 
2013-03-08 09:16:36 AM  
I'm thrilled for the advancements in technology but all I saw there was one big Tesla circle jerk.  It amused me.
 
2013-03-08 09:17:36 AM  
Hopefully just two generations away from an widely affordable version with such long-distance capabilities. When they come out with a 200+mile capable fully-electric mid-sized sedan for less than $35K, it will truly be revolutionary.
 
2013-03-08 09:23:51 AM  

Chabash: I'm thrilled for the advancements in technology but all I saw there was one big Tesla circle jerk.  It amused me.


It's much more entertaining listening to people who will never drive nor own one of these cars tell us how much they suck.
 
Xai
2013-03-08 09:24:27 AM  

Popcorn Johnny: Cool technology, but the cars are put together like it was done by a high school shop class. The interiors are especially bad.


From what I have seen they are far superior to most mainstream ford/gm/chrysler models at symilar prices.
 
2013-03-08 09:25:14 AM  

Chabash: I'm thrilled for the advancements in technology but all I saw there was one big Tesla circle jerk.  It amused me.


Whodathunkit?

I mean, it's not like it said Enthusiasts at the top or anything.....
 
2013-03-08 09:25:47 AM  

BillCo: I'd like to have one of these to stick in the back of my SUV in case I run out of gas.


On CNBC a couple weeks ago, they had regular check-ins from a guy doing a test drive of a Model S from Washington, DC to Boston. I think that is roughly a 6 hour drive and he did it during the course of the trading day (which is 6.5 hours). I think they did 3 re-charge stops along the way, but probably only needed 2.

Then a few days later (or maybe before), they had the CEO of a company that installs charging stations.  Their installations have been ramping up tremendously and there will be 10s of thousands across the country within a year or two... imagine what things will be like in 10 years. But please, keep mocking advancement, it makes you look so enlightened.
 
2013-03-08 09:30:37 AM  
The stereo on that thing comes pre-loaded and will only play the founder's music.

rushonrock.com
 
2013-03-08 09:32:33 AM  
Electric cars are so gay.  If you drive an electric car, then everyone will know you are a homosexual.

This means that the way we have always done things is better. Case closed.
 
2013-03-08 09:32:36 AM  
hot damn, that's a lot of dick suckin'.
 
2013-03-08 09:33:19 AM  

theknuckler_33: BillCo: I'd like to have one of these to stick in the back of my SUV in case I run out of gas.

On CNBC a couple weeks ago, they had regular check-ins from a guy doing a test drive of a Model S from Washington, DC to Boston. I think that is roughly a 6 hour drive and he did it during the course of the trading day (which is 6.5 hours). I think they did 3 re-charge stops along the way, but probably only needed 2.

Then a few days later (or maybe before), they had the CEO of a company that installs charging stations.  Their installations have been ramping up tremendously and there will be 10s of thousands across the country within a year or two... imagine what things will be like in 10 years. But please, keep mocking advancement, it makes you look so enlightened.


Really the only long term threat to electric is hydrogen.  If some lab tomorrow has a break through in hydrogen compression and is suddenly pumping out fuel cells with 8x the energy density of gasoline made from hydrogen, electric cars are done.  Tesla would be fine since they'd just swap out the power source, but everyone invested in the charging stations would be screwed.

Good on Musk for getting people to invest in and support the super charge stations, but that whole idea could go tits up.

/hydrogen is clearly the way to go for power
//once we can figure out how compress the damn stuff
 
2013-03-08 09:37:45 AM  

Rapmaster2000: Electric cars are so gay.  If you drive an electric car, then everyone will know you are a homosexual.

This means that the way we have always done things is better. Case closed.


The leaders in electric car tech are abandoning batteries for fuel cells.  But, we can pretend batteries are the long term answer because Fark loves batteries, and the name Tesla.
 
2013-03-08 09:39:08 AM  

ha-ha-guy: /hydrogen is clearly the way to go for power
//once we can figure out how compress the damn stuff


If you can compress it that much, you won't need to turn it in to electricity. Just let it out through a turbine. Won't even need to burn it.
 
2013-03-08 09:42:39 AM  

Chabash: I'm thrilled for the advancements in technology but all I saw there was one big Tesla circle jerk.  It amused me.


Remember, it's the company's site. Most have a tendency to only publish positive things. Still, that car looks awesome.
 
2013-03-08 09:43:38 AM  

ha-ha-guy: Really the only long term threat to electric is hydrogen.  If some lab tomorrow has a break through in hydrogen compression and is suddenly pumping out fuel cells with 8x the energy density of gasoline made from hydrogen, electric cars are done.  Tesla would be fine since they'd just swap out the power source, but everyone invested in the charging stations would be screwed.


A big breakthrough in hydrogen compression is much less likely than a battery breakthrough.  We've been seriously working on batteries for about 15 years tops while we have been working hard on metallurgy since the beginning of the industrial revolution.  There is not nearly as much room to advance.
 
2013-03-08 09:44:56 AM  

baka-san: Glad they are happy, but the guy from Texas is gonna regret selling his other cars when he has to go further than 200 miles...you know, almost anywhere else.


It would cost me about $300 + gas to rent a full size "premium" car from a place like Hertz for one week. I take long trips that wouldn't work in an EV maybe four or five times a year.

It would be a hell of a lot cheaper to just rent a nice car when I needed it than it would to constantly own even the crappiest little econobox. I'd wager the same is true for most people. I guess you could buy a cheapy little junker on the used market instead, but that seems like a whole host of bad ideas rolled into one when the whole point is to have something for long trips out of town.
 
2013-03-08 09:48:38 AM  

Rapmaster2000: Electric cars are so gay.  If you drive an electric car, then everyone will know you are a homosexual.

This means that the way we have always done things is better. Case closed.


Them cars new. Me no like new. New scare me. Grunt.
 
2013-03-08 09:48:58 AM  

Hollie Maea: ha-ha-guy: Really the only long term threat to electric is hydrogen.  If some lab tomorrow has a break through in hydrogen compression and is suddenly pumping out fuel cells with 8x the energy density of gasoline made from hydrogen, electric cars are done.  Tesla would be fine since they'd just swap out the power source, but everyone invested in the charging stations would be screwed.

A big breakthrough in hydrogen compression is much less likely than a battery breakthrough.  We've been seriously working on batteries for about 15 years tops while we have been working hard on metallurgy since the beginning of the industrial revolution.  There is not nearly as much room to advance.


WTF did I just read?
 
2013-03-08 09:50:06 AM  

The Muthaship: The leaders in electric car tech are abandoning batteries for fuel cells.  But, we can pretend batteries are the long term answer because Fark loves batteries, and the name Tesla.


Fuel cells are a non starter. In addition to the difficulty of producing and storing hydrogen, fuel cells have low power density and are relatively low efficiency.  People are enamored by them because they are stuck on this "we need instant refill" idea that has developed through 100 years of driving gas cars.  When electric vehicles have 300 mile range, which will be in a couple of years, no one will care about being able to "refill" in 5 minutes.  In an electric vehicle, you hardly ever stop to recharge, because you start with a "full tank" every morning.  When ranges go from 100 miles to 300 miles,  the number of times that most people drive farther than their range in a day will drop to one or two times a year.  And most people won't care that it takes 30 minutes to recharge because they will be stopping for lunch after 6 hours of driving anyway.
 
2013-03-08 09:53:03 AM  

Because People in power are Stupid: The stereo on that thing comes pre-loaded and will only play the founder's music.

[rushonrock.com image 473x480]


Is that Triple H on drums?
 
2013-03-08 09:54:59 AM  

Lost Thought 00: WTF did I just read?


Let me try again.  It was postulated that we'll soon be moving to hydrogen because "all we have to do is figure out how to compress it".  This is a metallurgy problem--figuring out how to design a container that can hold such high pressures.  But a lot of people from other industries have been working on that problem for hundreds of years, and so there isn't a lot of places that a breakthrough could be hiding.  Batteries, on the other hand, are a technology that researchers have only been seriously working on for a short amount of time.  There is still a lot of room for improvement.
 
2013-03-08 09:56:13 AM  
If I could afford the extended range Model S I'd buy one in a heartbeat.  A really amazing car and just all around fun to drive.  A friend has both the S and the original and at least the S is easier to get in and out of. Once we see a shift to a more efficient battery technology for longer ranges/faster charging/cheaper cost, I think you'll see a lot more on the road.
 
2013-03-08 09:59:27 AM  
Says a guy with a 911 in his garage.  So right off the bat you know you're dealing with someone with WAY too much money floating around and a predilection to spending it on extravagant impractical vehicles.

This in no way provides a sound footing for giving advice to 99.5% of prospective car buyers.
 
2013-03-08 10:04:22 AM  
FTA:
Not so wise to hang on to your inventory of expensive gas cars. They will depreciate more rapidly than they have historically because this is a bona fide disruptive change. People who can afford a better car won't buy the old stuff once they understand this car.

Yeah, because we all know being overconfident and writing off the current tech used by 99.999% of the entire planet is a good first step.

I know the thing rocks, but to try and make it sound like gas cars are going to be obsolete tomorrow just sounds arrogant. His cars are going to depreciate at the totally normal rate for years to come.
 
2013-03-08 10:04:29 AM  

Hollie Maea: Lost Thought 00: WTF did I just read?

Let me try again.  It was postulated that we'll soon be moving to hydrogen because "all we have to do is figure out how to compress it".  This is a metallurgy problem--figuring out how to design a container that can hold such high pressures.  But a lot of people from other industries have been working on that problem for hundreds of years, and so there isn't a lot of places that a breakthrough could be hiding.  Batteries, on the other hand, are a technology that researchers have only been seriously working on for a short amount of time.  There is still a lot of room for improvement.


That makes a lot more sense. I don't agree, because its not the length of time but rather the monetary motivation which drives breakthroughs. But at least now I get where you are coming from with the metallurgy comment.
 
2013-03-08 10:04:33 AM  

skozlaw: baka-san: Glad they are happy, but the guy from Texas is gonna regret selling his other cars when he has to go further than 200 miles...you know, almost anywhere else.

It would cost me about $300 + gas to rent a full size "premium" car from a place like Hertz for one week. I take long trips that wouldn't work in an EV maybe four or five times a year.

It would be a hell of a lot cheaper to just rent a nice car when I needed it than it would to constantly own even the crappiest little econobox. I'd wager the same is true for most people. I guess you could buy a cheapy little junker on the used market instead, but that seems like a whole host of bad ideas rolled into one when the whole point is to have something for long trips out of town.


Sort of this for me.  I am seriously thinking about leasing a Leaf or other EV (can't afford a Tesla).  We'll keep our minivan which great for long trips when extended family member come with or we need more space to haul around our St. Bernard.  But really, I don't use the van's capacity all that much.  It would be cheap to keep it insured, drive it occasionally to make sure all it well with it and then use it on long trips.  Over 90% of our driving in in town within less than a 20 mile radius.

I know I won't be saving money by leasing an EV over a paid off vehicle, but to me that is not the point.  I want to reduce the emissions and impact myself and my family has and I am simply putting my money on what I think will be a better long term investment to that end.  Supporting that industry will lead to better technologies later down the road and I'm fortunate enough to be able to do so.
 
2013-03-08 10:05:05 AM  

Hollie Maea: The Muthaship: The leaders in electric car tech are abandoning batteries for fuel cells.  But, we can pretend batteries are the long term answer because Fark loves batteries, and the name Tesla.

Fuel cells are a non starter. In addition to the difficulty of producing and storing hydrogen, fuel cells have low power density and are relatively low efficiency.  People are enamored by them because they are stuck on this "we need instant refill" idea that has developed through 100 years of driving gas cars.  When electric vehicles have 300 mile range, which will be in a couple of years, no one will care about being able to "refill" in 5 minutes.  In an electric vehicle, you hardly ever stop to recharge, because you start with a "full tank" every morning.  When ranges go from 100 miles to 300 miles,  the number of times that most people drive farther than their range in a day will drop to one or two times a year.  And most people won't care that it takes 30 minutes to recharge because they will be stopping for lunch after 6 hours of driving anyway.


You better call Renault-Nissan, Toyota and Daimler.  They are wasting tons of money!
 
2013-03-08 10:07:11 AM  

The Muthaship: You better call Renault-Nissan, Toyota and Daimler.  They are wasting tons of money!


They've been wasting tons of money on fuel cells for decades.  Actually they aren't really wasting money on it because government officials are always super enamored with fuel cells and constantly give out grants to the big automakers to make sure they are always fiddling with a fuel cell "concept".
 
2013-03-08 10:08:53 AM  

cefm: Says a guy with a 911 in his garage. So right off the bat you know you're dealing with someone with WAY too much money floating around and a predilection to spending it on extravagant impractical vehicles.


Base 911's arent too too expensive. The way Porsche rapes you is options.
 
2013-03-08 10:13:51 AM  
The part where they start comparing themselves to visionary explorers is pretty precious.
 
2013-03-08 10:15:58 AM  

cefm: Says a guy with a 911 in his garage.  So right off the bat you know you're dealing with someone with WAY too much money floating around and a predilection to spending it on extravagant impractical vehicles.

This in no way provides a sound footing for giving advice to 99.5% of prospective car buyers.


I think the point is that these owners feel that the Tesla outperforms other high end vehicles.
 
2013-03-08 10:18:09 AM  

skozlaw: baka-san: Glad they are happy, but the guy from Texas is gonna regret selling his other cars when he has to go further than 200 miles...you know, almost anywhere else.

It would cost me about $300 + gas to rent a full size "premium" car from a place like Hertz for one week. I take long trips that wouldn't work in an EV maybe four or five times a year.

It would be a hell of a lot cheaper to just rent a nice car when I needed it than it would to constantly own even the crappiest little econobox. I'd wager the same is true for most people. I guess you could buy a cheapy little junker on the used market instead, but that seems like a whole host of bad ideas rolled into one when the whole point is to have something for long trips out of town.


I've been thinking the same thing.  Most of my long trips are with the family, dog, and almost all our clothes because my wife over packs. I figure I could just rent a big ass Suburban or something like it and ride in comfort for those trips.
 
2013-03-08 10:21:32 AM  

Hollie Maea: Lost Thought 00: WTF did I just read?

Let me try again.  It was postulated that we'll soon be moving to hydrogen because "all we have to do is figure out how to compress it".  This is a metallurgy problem--figuring out how to design a container that can hold such high pressures.  But a lot of people from other industries have been working on that problem for hundreds of years, and so there isn't a lot of places that a breakthrough could be hiding.  Batteries, on the other hand, are a technology that researchers have only been seriously working on for a short amount of time.  There is still a lot of room for improvement.


Seeing it solely as a metallurgy problem is incorrect.  These days it is approached more from a chemical engineering standpoint.  Just as the chemicals inside a battery were changed around (nickel cadmium to lithium ion for example), the hydrogen fuel cell can be changed by changing which hydrogen rich 'fuel' is used.  For example direct methanol holds a lot of promise given how easy it is to work with and transport, its big limitation is that it has a lower energy density than gasoline currently.  Companies are now going back and playing with various chemical solutions to the problem as opposed to just purely compressing hydrogen into a tank and tossing it into a car.

GM for example plans on having hybrid methanol fuel cell bus fleets on the road by the end of the decade.  The lower energy density of the methanol isn't a deal breaker in that application since it just means they fuel up when they cycle through the transit center.  It means more man hours in terms of someone putting the nozzle in the bus, but considering methanol is about $1.55 a gallon, the transit authorities will be happy to make that trade.  Meanwhile the Chemical Engineers will do whatever they do in their lasts to go get us some variant of methanol with a better engery density.
 
2013-03-08 10:24:30 AM  
I'd like to see an electric pickup. Most of my trips to get materials are shorter than 100 miles. I believe it could work well.
 
2013-03-08 10:27:06 AM  

Hollie Maea: When ranges go from 100 miles to 300 miles, the number of times that most people drive farther than their range in a day will drop to one or two times a year.


Hmm, more like 400 miles 5 to 10 times a year...
 
2013-03-08 10:29:37 AM  

SnarfVader: I'd like to see an electric pickup. Most of my trips to get materials are shorter than 100 miles. I believe it could work well.


Sure, but what would you do without a SuperDurMaxDuty 500 Diesel turbozied engine?  I mean, its not like some puny EV is going to have the real torque ratings a real man's truck needs to do real work.  If electric motors could pull big loads like that, you'd see them on things like trains and large ships right?
 
2013-03-08 10:31:34 AM  

ha-ha-guy: Hollie Maea: Lost Thought 00: WTF did I just read?

Let me try again.  It was postulated that we'll soon be moving to hydrogen because "all we have to do is figure out how to compress it".  This is a metallurgy problem--figuring out how to design a container that can hold such high pressures.  But a lot of people from other industries have been working on that problem for hundreds of years, and so there isn't a lot of places that a breakthrough could be hiding.  Batteries, on the other hand, are a technology that researchers have only been seriously working on for a short amount of time.  There is still a lot of room for improvement.

Seeing it solely as a metallurgy problem is incorrect.  These days it is approached more from a chemical engineering standpoint.  Just as the chemicals inside a battery were changed around (nickel cadmium to lithium ion for example), the hydrogen fuel cell can be changed by changing which hydrogen rich 'fuel' is used.  For example direct methanol holds a lot of promise given how easy it is to work with and transport, its big limitation is that it has a lower energy density than gasoline currently.  Companies are now going back and playing with various chemical solutions to the problem as opposed to just purely compressing hydrogen into a tank and tossing it into a car.

GM for example plans on having hybrid methanol fuel cell bus fleets on the road by the end of the decade.  The lower energy density of the methanol isn't a deal breaker in that application since it just means they fuel up when they cycle through the transit center.  It means more man hours in terms of someone putting the nozzle in the bus, but considering methanol is about $1.55 a gallon, the transit authorities will be happy to make that trade.  Meanwhile the Chemical Engineers will do whatever they do in their lasts to go get us some variant of methanol with a better engery density.


That's true, and is also work going on with hydrides.  This helps with the volumetric density problem, but removes the huge gravimetric density advantage that hydrogen has.
Anyway, if hydrogen/fuel cells are going to supplant battery electrics, they have to come out with a killer product before batteries cost 10 cents per watt-hour and before charging stations are ubiquitous.  After that, no one will care how fast you can refill a hydrogen tank.  So they have about 5 years tops.
 
2013-03-08 10:32:51 AM  

baka-san: Hollie Maea: When ranges go from 100 miles to 300 miles, the number of times that most people drive farther than their range in a day will drop to one or two times a year.

Hmm, more like 400 miles 5 to 10 times a year...


That's fine, as long as you are willing to stop for 30 minutes to each lunch after driving for 6 hours.
 
2013-03-08 10:48:51 AM  

Hollie Maea: Hmm, more like 400 miles 5 to 10 times a year...

That's fine, as long as you are willing to stop for 30 minutes to each lunch after driving for 6 hours.


Hell no...

That would be stopping just before you get there.
 
2013-03-08 10:53:32 AM  
I believe the answer to recharging EV's on long trips is to put special toll lanes on the highway that would inductively recharge your vehicle as you drive. The technology exists on a small scale for recharging small electronics. I wonder if anybody is working on that on a large scale.
 
2013-03-08 10:55:26 AM  

Hollie Maea: Anyway, if hydrogen/fuel cells are going to supplant battery electrics, they have to come out with a killer product before batteries cost 10 cents per watt-hour and before charging stations are ubiquitous.


Beside just cost though the batteries have a long way to go in other areas beside cost.  They're still unpleasant as fark to manufacture and if one explodes you get all kinds of nasty chemicals on you.  To be fair if your gas tank explodes, you get crisped, so it is more of pick your poison.  Coupled with that are how many times you can recharge a battery and the operating range of them.  There is also the longer term problem of what we do with all the used ones.  The ideal hydrogen fuel cell doesn't have that much in it in terms of unpleasant materials, so you just toss the vehicle in the car shredder and recycle the metal.

Batteries are here to stay and offer a lot of flexibility.  Many cities love their smaller electric utility vehicles since you can plug the thing into any 120 volt outlet and charge it.  On the flip side though electric is not so great for 'always on' vehicles like buses, police cars, snow plows, etc.  When you have a fleet of electric buses that each take 30+ minutes to charge off a super charger it means you need to buy a couple extra buses to cover those service gaps and the costs add up (500k per bus, plus extra maintenance costs due to increased fleet size).  Whereas methanol potentially offers the solution of "guy sticks the nozzle in and fuels it while the driver goes on his normal 10 minute break between routes".

Batteries are going to win for commuters and short style stuff.  The ease of finding a 120 volt plug so can trickle charge (if you can't find a super charger station) and the cost of electricity basically assures that.  For anything where the vehicle needs to refuel/recharge more than twice a day though, I'm not sure if batteries can win.
 
Displayed 50 of 112 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report