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(Slicing Up Eyeballs)   March 7th, 1983: New Order released the biggest-selling 7" single of all time, Blue Monday. Here is a wonderful retrospective of the indefatigable dance single's long, storied history   (slicingupeyeballs.com) divider line 65
    More: Cool, New Order, Peter Hook, Bernard Sumner, retrospectives, Joy Division  
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2730 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Mar 2013 at 11:50 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-07 11:53:31 PM  
Never heard of it-

boobies
 
2013-03-07 11:53:46 PM  
12" Single, failmitter.
 
2013-03-07 11:57:00 PM  
that song kicks your ass
 
2013-03-08 12:03:16 AM  

Badgers: 12" Single, failmitter.


How does it feel, to treat subby like you do?
 
2013-03-08 12:11:05 AM  
More importantly The Hurting by Tears For Fears was released.
 
2013-03-08 12:12:40 AM  
I'll be the one to say it.

I liked New Order's original. But I prefer the cover by Orgy. It just gels, for some odd reason I can't figure out.
 
2013-03-08 12:22:10 AM  

Clutch2013: I'll be the one to say it.

I liked New Order's original. But I prefer the cover by Orgy. It just gels, for some odd reason I can't figure out.


Same here... Actually, I got to know the song through Orgy's cover, and I thought it was pretty cool.

I love New Order's version, I just love Orgy's a bit more...
 
2013-03-08 12:26:48 AM  
I just can't believe it's been THIRTY farkING YEARS!!!! I remember when it was all new and fresh and exciting and the 80s were going to be fabulous and change the world! I would listen to The Quake and all they played were songs like this, no crappy Madonna or hair bands, just great New Wave songs by weird bands like Bauhaus and Sisters of Mercy and Depeche Mode...

/fark, I'm old
//NOOOOOO
///it'll pass and I'll feel better again
///and then *I'll* pass
////fark
 
2013-03-08 12:40:57 AM  

Syder: Badgers: 12" Single, failmitter.

How does it feel, to treat subby like you do?


He can and shall obey.
 
2013-03-08 12:44:44 AM  
That Top of the Pops appearance is hysterical. I'm convinced Bernard Sumner is chewing gum through the whole thing. And I love how near the end Hook just says "F*ck it" with the drumsticks and starts punching the pads. None of them seem like they want to be there AT ALL.

/still have that on VHS somewhere from 120 Minutes.
 
2013-03-08 12:46:41 AM  
I called it up in iTunes. It has been one year to the day since I last played it. So that's weird.
 
2013-03-08 12:48:24 AM  

silvervial: I remember when it was all new and fresh and exciting and the 80s were going to be fabulous and change the world!


The 80s were fabulous, in every sense of the word. And the 80s changed the world. We won the cold war. It was a strange, wonderful time to grow up. Idealism mixed freely with corporate culture. Cocaine was everywhere. In rock bands, the boys were prettier than the girls. Honestly, the 80s were better than the 60s. It was the greatest decade since the Roaring 20s. And just like the Roaring 20s, it was followed by a great depression, the Grunge era. The 80s were awesome. I just got a new car, and it came with XM radio, so I've been listening to Hair Nation. Honestly, White Lion always sucked. So many bands I have no memory of at all, and most of them are pretty bad. But it was still the greatest decade.
 
2013-03-08 01:41:26 AM  
I always thought the singer was doing a good deep Ian Curtis impression in a few lines in the song, particularly one "how does it feel" at one point....
 
2013-03-08 01:55:46 AM  
I have this in my stacks!
 
2013-03-08 02:08:41 AM  
Eh, for my synthpop three-chord hits, I preferred Temptation and Bizarre Love Triangle. They were a good live act, somewhat surprisingly.
 
2013-03-08 02:16:59 AM  
It's interesting comparing the original 83 version and the 87 versions. Same song, same band, just a different sound to it slightly.
 
2013-03-08 02:30:39 AM  
Here's a detailed history of the song:

1983: New Order releases the song as a 7" single.
Also 1983: New Order releases the song as a remixed 7" single (only in Poland)
1984: New Order releases the song as a 12" remix.
1985: New Order releases the song as a remastered 7" version
1986: New Order releases the song as a 12" of the remastered 7"
1987: New Order releases both on Compact Disc
1988: New Order re-records the song and releases it in a 12" version and a 7" version, with a new video
1989: New Order releases the original 7" single with the remastered 7" single on the B side.
Also 1989: New Order releases the original 12" remix with the remastered 12" remix on the B side.
Also 1989: New Order works with 808 State for an Acid House remix of Blue Monday.
1990: New Order goes on tour and at the Hammersmith Odeon plays nothing but a 45 minute version of that song
Also 1990: New Order completely re-records the song with new synthesizers
1991: Elektra records mistakenly releases CD-Maxi-Single the song as "New Order" by the band "Blue Monday"
1992: Deciding that the vocals on the 1990 re-recording are too warm, New Order re-re-records the song
1993: New Order releases commemorative 10-year anniversary edition of the song.
1995: Realizing they haven't had a new release in over a year, New Order releases the Blue Box Monday Monday re-mix of the song
Also in 1995: New Order decides to re-re-re-re-record the song again.
1996: Ian Curtis gets into his time machine and goes back to 1980 to warn himself about the song.
 
2013-03-08 02:32:18 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: (I also am curious and confused how early Goth got called "Positive Punk", since there isn't much "positive" in the music or the lyrics, must have been the self sarcasm that was more prevalent in the scene back then)


As part of "that scene" in the early 80s, we just thought it was all Punk.
Trivia: Who was the first drummer for Siouxie and the Banshees?
 
2013-03-08 02:40:19 AM  

unlikely: Trivia: Who was the first drummer for Siouxie and the Banshees?


That would be one John Simon Ritchie (aka Sid Vicious).
 
2013-03-08 02:50:36 AM  
What 'a ship in the harbor' may look like:

www.environmentteam.com
 
2013-03-08 02:51:30 AM  

unlikely: DarkSoulNoHope: (I also am curious and confused how early Goth got called "Positive Punk", since there isn't much "positive" in the music or the lyrics, must have been the self sarcasm that was more prevalent in the scene back then)

As part of "that scene" in the early 80s, we just thought it was all Punk.
Trivia: Who was the first drummer for Siouxie and the Banshees?


Siouxsie, not Siouxie

And it was Sid Vicious
/pet peeve
 
2013-03-08 02:56:57 AM  

djslowdive: Siouxsie, not Siouxie


2 AM you're lucky i didn't spell it Suzy
 
2013-03-08 03:26:12 AM  

Clutch2013: I'll be the one to say it.

I liked New Order's original. But I prefer the cover by Orgy. It just gels, for some odd reason I can't figure out.


Less synth.
 
2013-03-08 03:50:39 AM  

Clutch2013: I'll be the one to say it.

I liked New Order's original. But I prefer the cover by Orgy. It just gels, for some odd reason I can't figure out.


*wretch*

Crappy, half-ass cover used to bring attention to themselves by riding the popularity of another band/song. It's telling that their cover is the only song Orgy is remembered for.
 
2013-03-08 03:55:21 AM  

spiralscratch: Clutch2013: I'll be the one to say it.

I liked New Order's original. But I prefer the cover by Orgy. It just gels, for some odd reason I can't figure out.

*wretch*

Crappy, half-ass cover used to bring attention to themselves by riding the popularity of another band/song. It's telling that their cover is the only song Orgy is remembered for.


To be fair, it is a better version than the original that sounds like it was performed by a 5-year-old who got his first mini-Casio keyboard,.

/some songs are just better as covers. Blue Monday is one of them.
 
2013-03-08 04:22:10 AM  
The song that first got me interested in music when I was a kid. Good stuff.

Please note this wasn't when it was originally released lol
 
2013-03-08 04:50:07 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Punk style was an angry political rant of hard, fast songs lasting approximately 1:30 to 3 minutes maximum.


That's where you fall apart.

It's like 3 AM so forgive me if this is incoherent.

Punk wasn't a style or a movement it was an attitude. Usually it was summed up by "fark you I will not fit into the little box you're trying to put me in." It was kind of also about saying "yeah um music today has no soul and no life, it's overproduced baby food." And a lot of those early bands weren't just part of a movement, they were friends, swapping members back and forth. (that's Siouxsie Sioux in the back row. Did I spell it right that time?)

Find a live recording of the Damned from 1981, put it with a live recording of the Banshees from that period, and you'll be all "oh they're so different" but if you put them next to the Eagles or Santanna or Styx or the Little River band, they are much closer to each other than any of that canned plotz that passed for music at the time.

If you can say it was about anything besides extending a middle finger at expectations, I guess you could say it was also about extending a middle finger at conventional preconceptions. And for some people, being cool. Of course.

If you want to get what it was, or what it was about, or not, I'd recommend watching The Decline of Western Civilization (the first one, not that metal crap) and then maybe Repo Man. And as goofy as it sounds, SLC Punk wasn't bad for 30 years after the fact.

Once you've got those going, find live performances from the Sex Pistols, Siouxsie, the Damned, the Cure, the Stranglers, the Dead Kennedys, the early Cure, even the earlier (1975-77) stuff from the CBGB bands like the Talking Heads, the Go Gos, Blondie, whatever. The early early live stuff, like before they were signed to major labels and had some record company exec trying to package them for sale. Find the top 40 for that year and compare them, and you'll get closer.

And find video if you can - look at the crowds at those shows, the kids who are really really farking into it. Spot a mohawk if you can. Or leather. It's mostly t-shirts, jeans, short haircuts with the occasional long hair. If there's jackets they're bulky, canvas, mil surplus, whatever. Definitely nothing you'd ever find at hot topic.

By 82 or so, record companies had heard that punk was the new thing, and at that point anyone with a guitar and a song with the word f*ck in it could get a contract. Hell, even I got one and if there was a worse band out there... well TMLO's favorite cover act was maybe worse.

Hope that's enough links to get you going.

New Order and their continuous stream of Blue Mondays wasn't actually punk, ever, I think. Brit synth pop was its own creature. Don't get me wrong, I loved OMD and Depeche Mode, it just wasn't punk.
 
2013-03-08 05:04:07 AM  
 
2013-03-08 05:13:14 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Goth style was tongue-in-cheek but defined the genre using a slow droning beat with "Bella Lugosi's Dead" which lasts 9:04,


Oh and I'd meant to say, that's not really representative of Bauhaus. Try Kick in the Eye, or their version of Ziggy Stardust. I mean yeah it was their big hit but if you caught them live before 83 or so and you were expecting a lot of Lugosi...
 
2013-03-08 05:16:37 AM  
 
2013-03-08 05:49:18 AM  

unlikely: DarkSoulNoHope: Punk style was an angry political rant of hard, fast songs lasting approximately 1:30 to 3 minutes maximum.

That's where you fall apart.

It's like 3 AM so forgive me if this is incoherent.

Punk wasn't a style or a movement it was an attitude. Usually it was summed up by "fark you I will not fit into the little box you're trying to put me in." It was kind of also about saying "yeah um music today has no soul and no life, it's overproduced baby food." And a lot of those early bands weren't just part of a movement, they were friends, swapping members back and forth. (that's Siouxsie Sioux in the back row. Did I spell it right that time?)

Find a live recording of the Damned from 1981, put it with a live recording of the Banshees from that period, and you'll be all "oh they're so different" but if you put them next to the Eagles or Santanna or Styx or the Little River band, they are much closer to each other than any of that canned plotz that passed for music at the time.

If you can say it was about anything besides extending a middle finger at expectations, I guess you could say it was also about extending a middle finger at conventional preconceptions. And for some people, being cool. Of course.

If you want to get what it was, or what it was about, or not, I'd recommend watching The Decline of Western Civilization (the first one, not that metal crap) and then maybe Repo Man. And as goofy as it sounds, SLC Punk wasn't bad for 30 years after the fact.

Once you've got those going, find live performances from the Sex Pistols, Siouxsie, the Damned, the Cure, the Stranglers, the Dead Kennedys, the early Cure, even the earlier (1975-77) stuff from the CBGB bands like the Talking Heads, the Go Gos, Blondie, whatever. The early early live stuff, like before they were signed to major labels and had some record company exec trying to package them for sale. Find the top 40 for that year and compare them, and you'll get closer.

And find video if you can - lo ...


You sir, are forgiven :P
 
2013-03-08 08:19:20 AM  

Syder: Badgers: 12" Single, failmitter.

How does it feel, to treat subby like you do?


win.
 
2013-03-08 08:21:12 AM  
I was always more partial to True Faith.
 
2013-03-08 08:37:59 AM  

amindtat: I was always more partial to True Faith.


its a better song on a lot of levels, but its not as good of a 12" single for the dance floor, which was where Blue Monday ruled for a long time. when i started going to clubs in the late 80s thru the mid 90s before i grew out of it and realized it was easier to pick up women in bars, i heard it almost every time i went out.
 
2013-03-08 08:41:37 AM  

unlikely: Punk wasn't a style or a movement it was an attitude. Usually it was summed up by "fark you I will not fit into the little box you're trying to put me in." It was kind of also about saying "yeah um music today has no soul and no life, it's overproduced baby food."


This problem is even worse today, I think. I myself am kind of at the point where it's too early for a coherent serious analysis of the problem. Goth, Punk, and New Wave were pretty much what I grew up with  - when I wasn't being fed a continuous wave of Hendrix, Clapton, Santana, and the Beatles by my Mom (not that I'm complaining about that, either.) I came to it late. as I was entering my teen years in the 1990s. My preferred bands were Siouxsie and the Banshees/Creatures, Bauhaus/Love and Rockets, and Depeche Mode. When I started forming my own opinions about music, Siouxsie was still getting airplay in some places (Supersition had just dropped) and MTV still played music videos.

I am one of those people who still feels really betrayed by MTV. I know how silly that sounds. They seemed so much a part of the counterculture, when it was obvious they were part of the same machine that gave us Taylor Swift and the Biebs. Now we're turning to Youtube and Soundcloud for stuff that isn't being spoonfed to us over clearchannel by corporate suits. The 1990s goth babybat inside me still demands to know what went wrong.

/I know that none of this makes sense.
//Maybe another cup of coffee will help me sort it out.
///For the record, I hated Orgy's cover and thought they were one hit wonders when it dropped. Looks like I was right in the long run.
////Slashies.
 
2013-03-08 08:48:33 AM  

numb3r5ev3n: unlikely: Punk wasn't a style or a movement it was an attitude. Usually it was summed up by "fark you I will not fit into the little box you're trying to put me in." It was kind of also about saying "yeah um music today has no soul and no life, it's overproduced baby food."

This problem is even worse today, I think. I myself am kind of at the point where it's too early for a coherent serious analysis of the problem. Goth, Punk, and New Wave were pretty much what I grew up with  - when I wasn't being fed a continuous wave of Hendrix, Clapton, Santana, and the Beatles by my Mom (not that I'm complaining about that, either.) I came to it late. as I was entering my teen years in the 1990s. My preferred bands were Siouxsie and the Banshees/Creatures, Bauhaus/Love and Rockets, and Depeche Mode. When I started forming my own opinions about music, Siouxsie was still getting airplay in some places (Supersition had just dropped) and MTV still played music videos.

I am one of those people who still feels really betrayed by MTV. I know how silly that sounds. They seemed so much a part of the counterculture, when it was obvious they were part of the same machine that gave us Taylor Swift and the Biebs. Now we're turning to Youtube and Soundcloud for stuff that isn't being spoonfed to us over clearchannel by corporate suits. The 1990s goth babybat inside me still demands to know what went wrong.

/I know that none of this makes sense.
//Maybe another cup of coffee will help me sort it out.
///For the record, I hated Orgy's cover and thought they were one hit wonders when it dropped. Looks like I was right in the long run.
////Slashies.


if you wanna know why mtv doesnt play music videos any more, you should watch this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ysyZF-DZFY">http://www.youtube.com/w atch?v=9ysyZF-DZFY

its funny, but QFT
 
2013-03-08 09:16:55 AM  

unlikely: DarkSoulNoHope: Punk style was an angry political rant of hard, fast songs lasting approximately 1:30 to 3 minutes maximum.

That's where you fall apart.

It's like 3 AM so forgive me if this is incoherent.

Punk wasn't a style or a movement it was an attitude. Usually it was summed up by "fark you I will not fit into the little box you're trying to put me in." It was kind of also about saying "yeah um music today has no soul and no life, it's overproduced baby food." And a lot of those early bands weren't just part of a movement, they were friends, swapping members back and forth. (that's Siouxsie Sioux in the back row. Did I spell it right that time?)

Find a live recording of the Damned from 1981, put it with a live recording of the Banshees from that period, and you'll be all "oh they're so different" but if you put them next to the Eagles or Santanna or Styx or the Little River band, they are much closer to each other than any of that canned plotz that passed for music at the time.

If you can say it was about anything besides extending a middle finger at expectations, I guess you could say it was also about extending a middle finger at conventional preconceptions. And for some people, being cool. Of course.

If you want to get what it was, or what it was about, or not, I'd recommend watching The Decline of Western Civilization (the first one, not that metal crap) and then maybe Repo Man. And as goofy as it sounds, SLC Punk wasn't bad for 30 years after the fact.

Once you've got those going, find live performances from the Sex Pistols, Siouxsie, the Damned, the Cure, the Stranglers, the Dead Kennedys, the early Cure, even the earlier (1975-77) stuff from the CBGB bands like the Talking Heads, the Go Gos, Blondie, whatever. The early early live stuff, like before they were signed to major labels and had some record company exec trying to package them for sale. Find the top 40 for that year and compare them, and you'll get closer.

And find video if you can - lo ...


If you haven't yet, you should read this. A great, detailed history of pre-punk, punk and the various forms that it morphed into during the 80's.
 
2013-03-08 09:22:06 AM  
 
2013-03-08 09:40:38 AM  
 
2013-03-08 10:09:16 AM  
Blue Monday is fun to dance to but Bizarre Love Triangle will always be my favorite New Order song. Memories of cranking CFNY on the stereo in my friend Julie's silver Dodge Colt and hitting the Canadian club scene in college...
 
2013-03-08 10:18:05 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: I am curious how exactly though, Goth Rock and Punk didn't exactly mesh up rhythmically. Punk style was an angry political rant of hard, fast songs lasting approximately 1:30 to 3 minutes maximum.



"Rip It Up and Start Again" by Simon Reynolds might have some of the answers you're looking for. Though I actually prefer the shorter (by 200 pages!), American edition because it has a clearer narrative*, the longer ~600 page edition contains a section on Goth and New Order-esque bands.


*the book is essentially about how Punk led to the Post-Punk era and its effect on the (mostly British) mainstream. The longer version contains narratives about a lot more bands, but it doesn't quite fit well into the book's over-arching narrative and just kind of feels sort of randomly put together. The shorter version rewrites a chapter entirely (the longer version is written in oral history fashion) and generally just makes a bit more sense.
 
2013-03-08 10:53:17 AM  
 
2013-03-08 11:07:05 AM  

Dialectic: What?

No love for Erasure?http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1csbl_erasure-love-to-hate- you_music #.UToIUTvg0do


Andy Bell was an amazing voice.

THe other guy from Yaz and DM was a decent synthesizer dude and they had some nice tracks, but they were, basically, i think at the end of the day, just too gay.

"Respect" will always be a great Icon of the era tho
 
2013-03-08 11:18:37 AM  

Glenford: If you haven't yet, you should read this. A great, detailed history of pre-punk, punk and the various forms that it morphed into during the 80's.


Thanks, that's kinda neat. Needing to read it in fits and starts cuz of that pesky "work" thing, but enjoying it.
 
2013-03-08 11:22:31 AM  

Father_Jack: Dialectic: What?

No love for Erasure?http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1csbl_erasure-love-to-hate- you_music #.UToIUTvg0do

Andy Bell was an amazing voice.

THe other guy from Yaz and DM was a decent synthesizer dude and they had some nice tracks, but they were, basically, i think at the end of the day, just too gay.

"Respect" will always be a great Icon of the era tho


I'm as heterosexual as they come, and you can have my ERASURE CDs when you pry them from my
cold, dead fingers.

I can't believe I've never heard LOVE TO HATE YOU before now, and I will have to get it and put it on my
iPod along side ALWAYS, RESPECT, and their cover of TAKE A CHANCE ON ME.
 
2013-03-08 11:33:29 AM  

unlikely: Glenford: If you haven't yet, you should read this. A great, detailed history of pre-punk, punk and the various forms that it morphed into during the 80's.

Thanks, that's kinda neat. Needing to read it in fits and starts cuz of that pesky "work" thing, but enjoying it.


Sadly, the company that owns CFNY today are just sitting on hours and hours of The Ongoing History of New Music. The Secret History of Rock is okay, but back in the day Sunday nights was reserved for an hour of Alan Cross. I'd love to be able to purchase the original episodes.
 
2013-03-08 11:36:24 AM  

Glenford: unlikely: Glenford: If you haven't yet, you should read this. A great, detailed history of pre-punk, punk and the various forms that it morphed into during the 80's.

Thanks, that's kinda neat. Needing to read it in fits and starts cuz of that pesky "work" thing, but enjoying it.

Sadly, the company that owns CFNY today are just sitting on hours and hours of The Ongoing History of New Music. The Secret History of Rock is okay, but back in the day Sunday nights was reserved for an hour of Alan Cross. I'd love to be able to purchase the original episodes.


Double sadly, apparently this PDF is an "incomplete preview"

I wonder if all that Alan Cross is downloadable?
 
2013-03-08 11:39:18 AM  
 
2013-03-08 11:48:27 AM  

unlikely: Glenford: unlikely: Glenford: If you haven't yet, you should read this. A great, detailed history of pre-punk, punk and the various forms that it morphed into during the 80's.

Thanks, that's kinda neat. Needing to read it in fits and starts cuz of that pesky "work" thing, but enjoying it.

Sadly, the company that owns CFNY today are just sitting on hours and hours of The Ongoing History of New Music. The Secret History of Rock is okay, but back in the day Sunday nights was reserved for an hour of Alan Cross. I'd love to be able to purchase the original episodes.

Double sadly, apparently this PDF is an "incomplete preview"

I wonder if all that Alan Cross is downloadable?


I see a couple of torrent sites that have it, but am blocked here at work. There are almost 700 episodes.I'd love to get my hands on the first 22 where he does a year by year review.
 
2013-03-08 12:18:37 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: I'm as heterosexual as they come, and you can have my ERASURE CDs when you pry them from my
cold, dead fingers. I can't believe I've never heard LOVE TO HATE YOU before now, and I will have to get it and put it on my
iPod along side ALWAYS, RESPECT, and their cover of TAKE A CHANCE ON ME.


Erasure had amazing singles and crappy albums. But oh, those singles!

Oh, L'amour
Phantom Bride
Blue Savannah
Star
 
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