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(Geek.com)   Meh: New LED bulb. Hmmmm: Aesthetics match existing bulb options closely. Whoa: 60W equivalent uses about 9W, has a 10 year warranty. Shut-Up-And-Take-My-Money: Goes on sale NEXT WEEK at Home Depot for $13 and under   (geek.com) divider line 29
    More: Cool, LED bulbs, Cree LED, Energy Star, light bulbs, CFLs, incandescent light bulb  
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9556 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Mar 2013 at 12:17 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-03-07 11:05:15 AM
3 votes:
Great idea: low watt usage.  Fark: will never last the warranty period, but long enough for you to lose the receipt. TotalFark: 60w bulb doesn't provide enough light to read by.
2013-03-07 12:44:19 PM
2 votes:
I'm looking forward to LEDs that auto-adjust their color throughout the day, which can't be that far away. Like a lot of people I prefer a whiter, daylight balance during the day, but would prefer something that more closely mimics sunrise/sunset at each end of the day. I suspect our bodies are evolved to respond to the color changes.
2013-03-07 12:32:09 PM
2 votes:
One day I'll say, "Grandson, there was a day when Christmas lights were beautiful."
2013-03-07 12:21:54 PM
2 votes:

Kazan: it's not photography critical so it doesn't matter too much. 5000k-6000k is going to look better period, CRI inside that band is just which bulb is better in band.


If you skimp on CRI, you'll find that some colours will just be shiat and muted. LEDs with a poor CRI will typically mute reds quite a fair bit, for example. Most people like their light sources to properly portray colours. It may not be important to you, but that doesn't mean that it isn't important to others
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-03-07 11:58:52 AM
2 votes:

Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.


I have never understood why people claim they like that dingy yellow light.  I suspect they just don't like change.
2013-03-07 11:49:24 AM
2 votes:

Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.


If you really hate that, the article points out that the 60w equivalent will also be available in a Daylight variety
2013-03-07 05:13:43 PM
1 votes:

ChubbyTiger: Anyone want to weigh in on what should be considered a good CRI?


Usually CRI above 80 is considered good, but one must understand what effects CRI. CRI is a metric of color shift under a particular lamp with 100 being no noticeable shift in color. There are many things that effect color shift. Color temperature effects CRI but it is also dependent on light intensity. Color temperature is the temperature of an ideal black object that gives off that color of light. The higher the temperature the bluer and whiter the light, the lower the temperature the lower the more yellow the light.

The higher temperature the lamp, the more intense the light will need to be to offer good color rendering. At low intensity, high temperature lamps will give a noticeable blue hue color shift. At high insensity low color temperature lamps will give off a noticeable yellow color shift.

In spaces one wishes to have lower lighting levels, lower temperature lamps will offer the best rendering. Spaces in which one wants higher light levels, high temperature lamps should be used. Some places, you want both like a dinning room in your house. You want low intensity when eating but higher intensity when using your dining room table as a work table. Some commercial LED manufacturers make color temperature shift fixtures that shift the color color temperature as the intensity is adjusted with a dimmer.

Age also effects color temperature preference. As people get older they wish to have high light intensity so the preference high temperature lamps goes up.

Of course there is also personal preference. I'm still young and my eyes are still in good shape so I prefer lower intensity lighting with lower color temperature. I wouldn't put anything over a 60W equivalent in my house with my preference being 40W equivalents.
2013-03-07 04:31:00 PM
1 votes:

ElusiveWookiee: But the German scientists claimed that several carcinogenic chemicals and toxins were released when the environmentally-friendly compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were switched on, including phenol, naphthalene and styrene.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8462626/Energy-saving-light-bulbs- co ntain-cancer-causing-chemicals.html


1) Fun fact: Phenol is the active ingredient in Chloraseptic, which is approved to spray into the mouths of adults and children.  Not a carcinogen.
2) Naphthalene is the active ingredient in mothballs.  The dosages that cause harm are extremely high-- generally from children eating them.
3) Styrene is not a carcinogen.
4) Why can't I find this study?  Why are no details provided?  Why is it that when I search for the "Federation of German Engineers" it only returns this "study"?
5) Where are the chemicals coming from?  How much is emitted?  How does this amount compare to the emissions associated with the higher power requirements of the incandescent it replaces?

Looks like you're just doing the old "FW: FW: FW: FW:" of some Jenny-Mcarthy-level scaremongering.  I'm skeptical.
2013-03-07 04:14:38 PM
1 votes:

KarmicDisaster: Cyrorm: Home Depot already has LED lights for under $10 from EcoSmart, and they are the same price pojnts as Cree and have a 50k hour rating on them instead of 25k and they too are already energy star compliant.  Cree is offering nothing new, slightly worse product for the same cost and this is big exciting news why?

I don't like the ecosmart as much. The color for one thing.


What little I know about LEDs is a result of my weird fascination with LED flashlights.

A batch of LEDs made at the same time will exhibit some variability in brightness and color, due to random factors in the manufacturing process.  The LEDs are sorted into bins of varying luminous flux, chromaticity, and color.  So, for example, some nominally white LEDs from a given batch might be tinted somewhat yellow/green, or tinted blue, or appear perfectly white.  Some of these will be brighter or dimmer at a given  current.

Bins for Cree LEDs

Among flashaholics, this phenomenon used to be called the "Luxeon lottery" (dating from when the Luxeon high-flux LEDs were the only game in town).  One might have paid more to have a light made with an emitter rated highly for luminous flux, only to have a greenish tint that one might find displeasing.

In real world use, the difference is usually imperceptible, and for a white LED flashlight you'd probably only see it if you're shining the light on a white wall.

There can be a great difference in the cost of the various bins.  LED light bulbs may be using emitters from low-flux bins, as they are cheaper.  The more expensive LED light bulbs *might* be using better emitters.
2013-03-07 04:13:52 PM
1 votes:

chimp_ninja: (*): For the inevitable "CFLs done lasted 15 minutes in my housetrailerdungeon" post, get your wiring checked and buy a reputable brand, not the cheapest thing on the shelf. But it's probably your wiring.


Actually, it might also be their fixtures.

I found that CFLs worked mostly great except in a couple of locations where they repeatedly burned out quickly. It turns out that if the metal tab thingy* inside the fixture that is supposed to make contact with the base of the bulb is too flattened, it won't make good contact, you'll get arcing, and your CFLs will have a very short life. Just bend the tab a little outwards so that it maintains pressure against the bulb when the bulb is screwed in, and those fixtures have the same bulb life as the rest of the house.

*I'm sure there's a technical name for the metal tab thingy, and hopefully somebody will be along to share it.
2013-03-07 04:05:25 PM
1 votes:

raygundan: Shazam999: chimp_ninja: Shazam999: I find the older Phillips ones can run quite hot. If they're in a can they get really, really hot. I had one in a can in the living room and it would start flickering on and off after a few hours. I replaced it with a Luminus one from Costco which seems to work a lot better (it spreads the light out much better and runs much cooler).

Some of the older bulbs specify in their packaging that they're not intended for inverted installation-- they dissipate a good bit of heat from the base, and the design assumes some airflow around the bulb.  The newer bulbs seem to have this problem beaten.

Thing is, it was a PAR30 form factor, so I can't see how it could be mounted any other way.

That's farking hilarious.  Engineering, meet Marketing.  Marketing, this is Engineering.  Please talk about things amongst yourselves before you create amusingly unusable products.


Nah, I don't blame marketing. It was Philips' first stab at a BR30 (sorry, it wasn't a PAR30) LED.  The model itself was only on the shelves for a few months before it was replaced with an apparently much better model.

Their GU10s have also gotten much better.
2013-03-07 03:54:49 PM
1 votes:

RexTalionis: vpb: Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.

I have never understood why people claim they like that dingy yellow light.  I suspect they just don't like change.

Because people like warmer colors and that warmer lighting is easier on the eyes.


czetie: I'm looking forward to LEDs that auto-adjust their color throughout the day, which can't be that far away. Like a lot of people I prefer a whiter, daylight balance during the day, but would prefer something that more closely mimics sunrise/sunset at each end of the day. I suspect our bodies are evolved to respond to the color changes.


Ihttp://stereopsis.com/flux/n case you guys havent heard of it, let me introduce you to one of my most favorite little computer programs.
2013-03-07 03:35:49 PM
1 votes:
I've been buying Inland 40W LED Bulbs at Microcenter for some time now.

None of them have burned out, and they provide pretty good lighting. $0.72/year cost of operation, 490 Lumens @ 3000K. $7.99, or $8,99 for the dimmable version.

They have a nice heavy heat sink on them.

I pick up a few every time I go in the store, but I've noticed others have discovered them now, and the store is now having trouble keeping them in stock.

img2u.info
2013-03-07 03:12:35 PM
1 votes:

drewogatory: Parthenogenetic: drewogatory: Holy shiat. I had no idea light bulb geeks were a thing. I bow to your guys unbelievable knowledge about something so inconsequential.

There are entire forums dedicated to flashlights.  No, not flEshlights, you pervert.  FlAshlights.

And knives.

And guns.

There is a lot of user overlap among them.

I'm in the firearms industry, so, believe me, I know. I actually wasn't being snarky, I love people with random (to me) knowledge bases.


Me too!

For more geekery about this topic, check out the Fixed Lighting subforum at candlepoweforums.  Most of the threads are about various LED lights because that's where the action is, but there are some threads about incandescent and fluorescent lighting as well.

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?89-Fixed-Lighti ng
2013-03-07 02:28:12 PM
1 votes:

Parthenogenetic: drewogatory: Holy shiat. I had no idea light bulb geeks were a thing. I bow to your guys unbelievable knowledge about something so inconsequential.

There are entire forums dedicated to flashlights.  No, not flEshlights, you pervert.  FlAshlights.

And knives.

And guns.

There is a lot of user overlap among them.


I'm in the firearms industry, so, believe me, I know. I actually wasn't being snarky, I love people with random (to me) knowledge bases.
2013-03-07 02:23:29 PM
1 votes:

drewogatory: Holy shiat. I had no idea light bulb geeks were a thing. I bow to your guys unbelievable knowledge about something so inconsequential.


There are entire forums dedicated to flashlights.  No, not flEshlights, you pervert.  FlAshlights.

And knives.

And guns.

There is a lot of user overlap among them.
2013-03-07 02:16:14 PM
1 votes:

chimp_ninja: imfallen_angel: Got a deal off eBay for 12 x 40w equivalent for 25 $... cool looking, very bright in the light it gives, but one reason I got them was that I believed that they'd have protective circuitry, and my lights in the bathroom keep burning out (regular and CFL). Sadly, I've got one dead already and another that's appearing to be dying or is already.

Go hire an electrician to inspect your house top to bottom.  Incandescent bulbs aren't very sensitive to electrical problems, so if they're burning out there's something very wrong.  The electrician will probably charge a couple hundred bucks just for the inspection (before any repairs), but that's a lot cheaper than a fire.


Considered it and will do at some point, but I expect that it's not just a internal power thing as the city's power is always fluctuating here (even if in middle of city)... I get more power outage than country folks... even had to get a generator after two power outs that lasted a few days.

It's really weird... and very annoying... I now have an UPS with full display and I can see the brown outs and the spikes happening on a regular basis...

So if I bring an electrician in, I'll probably go with some sort of power filter... heck if I could afford it, a full backup system... even go solar.. but, not rich like some Farkers with their wicked setups I've read from some.
2013-03-07 02:01:05 PM
1 votes:

drewogatory: Holy shiat. I had no idea light bulb geeks were a thing. I bow to your guys unbelievable knowledge about something so inconsequential.


How many light bulbs do you have in your house? How many do you purchase in a year?  Do you like being able to see at night?

While the minute details of how light bulbs work and why one is superior to another might not be important in your day-to-day life, they're hardly "inconsequential".

/not a light bulb geek, just a regular geek
2013-03-07 01:54:07 PM
1 votes:
Conservatives still won't buy them cause you wouldn't want the granola eaters to be right.
2013-03-07 12:58:36 PM
1 votes:

TheGreatGazoo: have about half my house already converted to LED lighting, and this will probably get some more going that way. Throw in a 13 SEER air conditioner and a 92% efficient gas furnace and the old house is pretty cheap on the utilities.


More efficient lighting also helps that 13 SEER air conditioner.  Most people don't appreciate that their old 60W incandescent bulbs are basically 9W of lighting attached to a 51W space heater with no ventilation.
2013-03-07 12:37:52 PM
1 votes:
Cool, Ill have to try one out. I've been slowly switching from incandescents to LED, skipping the CFL's.
2013-03-07 12:34:50 PM
1 votes:

RexTalionis: We've been conditioned to expect warm lighting in the evenings for thousands of years.


There's probably a biological component as well, circadian rhythms and such which are more sensitive to blue light.

Another potential drawback with this new bulb - it looks like it radiates mostly sideways. That would be OK in some fixtures but it would suck if you wanted to light an area directly underneath a vertically-mounted bulb.
2013-03-07 12:33:48 PM
1 votes:

H31N0US: No thanks, you can keep your libtard non-american light bulbs. If monofilement was good enough for Thomas Edison, it's good enough for me.


Cree is an American company.

/I know, I know...
2013-03-07 12:31:55 PM
1 votes:

Cewley: Great idea: low watt usage.  Fark: will never last the warranty period, but long enough for you to lose the receipt. TotalFark: 60w bulb doesn't provide enough light to read by.


You might want to get checked for cataracts.
2013-03-07 12:22:42 PM
1 votes:

Kazan: vpb: I suspect they just don't like change.

yes.

RexTalionis: Because people like warmer colors and that warmer lighting is easier on the eyes.

but.. but.. that's not warmer! that's a colder black body equivalent!!!

:P (yes i know "warm color palette" vs "actual black body temperature")

I also disagree, that piss yellow light is dim, makes everything look like crap and is just generally ugly.


We've been conditioned to expect warm lighting in the evenings for thousands of years. That kind of daylight-ish white light is just weird at night. My bedroom uses the daylight-style bulbs and my living room uses more yellowish bulbs and my bedroom is way less inviting a place than my living room, probably explaining my lack of success with the ladies.
2013-03-07 12:22:38 PM
1 votes:
Oh, and I'm referring to residential lighting (and assuming that you are as well)
2013-03-07 12:04:56 PM
1 votes:

vpb: Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.

I have never understood why people claim they like that dingy yellow light.  I suspect they just don't like change.


Because people like warmer colors and that warmer lighting is easier on the eyes.
2013-03-07 12:01:14 PM
1 votes:
So, Compact fluorescents are the Sega Dreamcast of lighting, now? As in, revolutionary and widely-adopted at first, but quickly replaced with something much better?
2013-03-07 11:27:01 AM
1 votes:
I've yet to have any early failures in my apartment full of LEDs (90% of which are Phillips), and Cree makes some of the best LEDs out there, so I'm looking forward to this
 
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