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(Geek.com)   Meh: New LED bulb. Hmmmm: Aesthetics match existing bulb options closely. Whoa: 60W equivalent uses about 9W, has a 10 year warranty. Shut-Up-And-Take-My-Money: Goes on sale NEXT WEEK at Home Depot for $13 and under   (geek.com) divider line 177
    More: Cool, LED bulbs, Cree LED, Energy Star, light bulbs, CFLs, incandescent light bulb  
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9569 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Mar 2013 at 12:17 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-07 03:47:44 PM  

MaxxLarge: So, Compact fluorescents are the Sega Dreamcast of lighting, now? As in, revolutionary and widely-adopted at first, but quickly replaced with something much better?


Define "quickly."  They're what, three decades old now?  That's a decent run for a piece of technology these days, particularly any sort of technology that is in direct competition with the ultra-fast-moving semiconductor industry.  They're also still the cheap option.  CFLs are less than a buck at Costco, which means they'll probably hang on a bit longer.

Still, the Cree bulb is a welcome development, and it will most likely only get better from here.
 
2013-03-07 03:48:37 PM  

Cyrorm: Home Depot already has LED lights for under $10 from EcoSmart, and they are the same price pojnts as Cree and have a 50k hour rating on them instead of 25k and they too are already energy star compliant.  Cree is offering nothing new, slightly worse product for the same cost and this is big exciting news why?


I don't like the ecosmart as much. The color for one thing.
 
2013-03-07 03:54:49 PM  

RexTalionis: vpb: Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.

I have never understood why people claim they like that dingy yellow light.  I suspect they just don't like change.

Because people like warmer colors and that warmer lighting is easier on the eyes.


czetie: I'm looking forward to LEDs that auto-adjust their color throughout the day, which can't be that far away. Like a lot of people I prefer a whiter, daylight balance during the day, but would prefer something that more closely mimics sunrise/sunset at each end of the day. I suspect our bodies are evolved to respond to the color changes.


Ihttp://stereopsis.com/flux/n case you guys havent heard of it, let me introduce you to one of my most favorite little computer programs.
 
2013-03-07 03:56:36 PM  
While we're all being lightbulb dorks, is anybody using an LED bulb in a garage door opener?  I tried, but the ones I had worked like short-range radio jammers.  If the light was on, the opener wouldn't respond to the wireless signal.   So you could open the door, but not close it again until the light finally went out.  The interference is pretty low-power, since using the same bulb in a fixture just a foot away was fine-- it was only an issue when installed in the opener itself.   Haven't gone back and tried other types, but if somebody has one installed and things are working, I'd love to know which brand.
 
2013-03-07 03:57:22 PM  

Cyno01: Ihttp://stereopsis.com/flux/n case you guys havent heard of it, let me introduce you to one of my most favorite little computer programs.


I love f.lux. And since I work past sundown in the winter at an office job, I have it set up there. Only issue is that it doesn't seem to affect the cursor colour tone
 
2013-03-07 03:58:16 PM  

WhippingBoy: Those things give you cancer.


Unless you know something I don't, I think you're mistaking LED for CFL.  CFLs are the ones that leach a carcinogenic gas when they are on.

Cewley: Great idea: low watt usage.  Fark: will never last the warranty period, but long enough for you to lose the receipt. TotalFark: 60w bulb doesn't provide enough light to read by.


I use 40W exclusively in my home, and have no issues at all?
 
2013-03-07 03:59:03 PM  

Shazam999: chimp_ninja: Shazam999: I find the older Phillips ones can run quite hot. If they're in a can they get really, really hot. I had one in a can in the living room and it would start flickering on and off after a few hours. I replaced it with a Luminus one from Costco which seems to work a lot better (it spreads the light out much better and runs much cooler).

Some of the older bulbs specify in their packaging that they're not intended for inverted installation-- they dissipate a good bit of heat from the base, and the design assumes some airflow around the bulb.  The newer bulbs seem to have this problem beaten.

Thing is, it was a PAR30 form factor, so I can't see how it could be mounted any other way.


That's farking hilarious.  Engineering, meet Marketing.  Marketing, this is Engineering.  Please talk about things amongst yourselves before you create amusingly unusable products.
 
2013-03-07 04:00:06 PM  

raygundan: While we're all being lightbulb dorks, is anybody using an LED bulb in a garage door opener?  I tried, but the ones I had worked like short-range radio jammers.  If the light was on, the opener wouldn't respond to the wireless signal.   So you could open the door, but not close it again until the light finally went out.  The interference is pretty low-power, since using the same bulb in a fixture just a foot away was fine-- it was only an issue when installed in the opener itself.   Haven't gone back and tried other types, but if somebody has one installed and things are working, I'd love to know which brand.


Did you try a dimmable LED bulb? The problem might be the power line being inline between the controller and the light. Maybe the dimmable bulb will isolate the power line?
 
2013-03-07 04:00:34 PM  

raygundan: While we're all being lightbulb dorks, is anybody using an LED bulb in a garage door opener?  I tried, but the ones I had worked like short-range radio jammers.  If the light was on, the opener wouldn't respond to the wireless signal.   So you could open the door, but not close it again until the light finally went out.  The interference is pretty low-power, since using the same bulb in a fixture just a foot away was fine-- it was only an issue when installed in the opener itself.   Haven't gone back and tried other types, but if somebody has one installed and things are working, I'd love to know which brand.


I have been looking into LED reverse lights for my truck and a VERY common problem is that when you put them in your stereo system starts getting a lot of static when you are in reverse, so it does sound like there is some form of interference or electrical noise caused by the electronics package in the LED. (Yes, most of the well regarded replacement bulbs I have seen are Cree and they still have this issue.) For most people, they just ignore the problem since how often do you really need to be in reverse? For other applications I would worry about it more.
 
2013-03-07 04:00:53 PM  
Cewley: Great idea: low watt usage. Fark: will never last the warranty period, but long enough for you to lose the receipt. TotalFark: 60w bulb doesn't provide enough light to read by.

You forgot "whines like a biatch".

// Have a CFL bulb that came with a lamp I bought, the lamp went into my bedroom, but I had to swap the bulb with one of the lamps I have in the living room.

// the noise of the TV drowns out the high pitched whine.
 
2013-03-07 04:02:34 PM  

ElusiveWookiee: CFLs are the ones that leach a carcinogenic gas when they are on.


Um, no.
 
2013-03-07 04:05:25 PM  

raygundan: Shazam999: chimp_ninja: Shazam999: I find the older Phillips ones can run quite hot. If they're in a can they get really, really hot. I had one in a can in the living room and it would start flickering on and off after a few hours. I replaced it with a Luminus one from Costco which seems to work a lot better (it spreads the light out much better and runs much cooler).

Some of the older bulbs specify in their packaging that they're not intended for inverted installation-- they dissipate a good bit of heat from the base, and the design assumes some airflow around the bulb.  The newer bulbs seem to have this problem beaten.

Thing is, it was a PAR30 form factor, so I can't see how it could be mounted any other way.

That's farking hilarious.  Engineering, meet Marketing.  Marketing, this is Engineering.  Please talk about things amongst yourselves before you create amusingly unusable products.


Nah, I don't blame marketing. It was Philips' first stab at a BR30 (sorry, it wasn't a PAR30) LED.  The model itself was only on the shelves for a few months before it was replaced with an apparently much better model.

Their GU10s have also gotten much better.
 
2013-03-07 04:07:52 PM  

chimp_ninja: ElusiveWookiee: CFLs are the ones that leach a carcinogenic gas when they are on.

Um, no.


Um, OK.

But the German scientists claimed that several carcinogenic chemicals and toxins were released when the environmentally-friendly compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were switched on, including phenol, naphthalene and styrene.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8462626/Energy-saving-light-bulbs- co ntain-cancer-causing-chemicals.html
 
2013-03-07 04:09:41 PM  

Shazam999: Their GU10s have also gotten much better.


I'll say. I'm using their second newest generation of 35W equivalent GU10 MR16 lights in my kitchen, on a dimmer and they are quite awesome (been using them for about 8 months now with no early failures)
 
2013-03-07 04:11:18 PM  

Shazam999: raygundan: Shazam999: chimp_ninja: Shazam999: I find the older Phillips ones can run quite hot. If they're in a can they get really, really hot. I had one in a can in the living room and it would start flickering on and off after a few hours. I replaced it with a Luminus one from Costco which seems to work a lot better (it spreads the light out much better and runs much cooler).

Some of the older bulbs specify in their packaging that they're not intended for inverted installation-- they dissipate a good bit of heat from the base, and the design assumes some airflow around the bulb.  The newer bulbs seem to have this problem beaten.

Thing is, it was a PAR30 form factor, so I can't see how it could be mounted any other way.

That's farking hilarious.  Engineering, meet Marketing.  Marketing, this is Engineering.  Please talk about things amongst yourselves before you create amusingly unusable products.

Nah, I don't blame marketing. It was Philips' first stab at a BR30 (sorry, it wasn't a PAR30) LED.  The model itself was only on the shelves for a few months before it was replaced with an apparently much better model.

Their GU10s have also gotten much better.


Didn't mean to sound like I was blaming marketing-- just the lack of communication.  Which is usually a mutual failure.
 
2013-03-07 04:13:52 PM  

chimp_ninja: (*): For the inevitable "CFLs done lasted 15 minutes in my housetrailerdungeon" post, get your wiring checked and buy a reputable brand, not the cheapest thing on the shelf. But it's probably your wiring.


Actually, it might also be their fixtures.

I found that CFLs worked mostly great except in a couple of locations where they repeatedly burned out quickly. It turns out that if the metal tab thingy* inside the fixture that is supposed to make contact with the base of the bulb is too flattened, it won't make good contact, you'll get arcing, and your CFLs will have a very short life. Just bend the tab a little outwards so that it maintains pressure against the bulb when the bulb is screwed in, and those fixtures have the same bulb life as the rest of the house.

*I'm sure there's a technical name for the metal tab thingy, and hopefully somebody will be along to share it.
 
2013-03-07 04:14:38 PM  

KarmicDisaster: Cyrorm: Home Depot already has LED lights for under $10 from EcoSmart, and they are the same price pojnts as Cree and have a 50k hour rating on them instead of 25k and they too are already energy star compliant.  Cree is offering nothing new, slightly worse product for the same cost and this is big exciting news why?

I don't like the ecosmart as much. The color for one thing.


What little I know about LEDs is a result of my weird fascination with LED flashlights.

A batch of LEDs made at the same time will exhibit some variability in brightness and color, due to random factors in the manufacturing process.  The LEDs are sorted into bins of varying luminous flux, chromaticity, and color.  So, for example, some nominally white LEDs from a given batch might be tinted somewhat yellow/green, or tinted blue, or appear perfectly white.  Some of these will be brighter or dimmer at a given  current.

Bins for Cree LEDs

Among flashaholics, this phenomenon used to be called the "Luxeon lottery" (dating from when the Luxeon high-flux LEDs were the only game in town).  One might have paid more to have a light made with an emitter rated highly for luminous flux, only to have a greenish tint that one might find displeasing.

In real world use, the difference is usually imperceptible, and for a white LED flashlight you'd probably only see it if you're shining the light on a white wall.

There can be a great difference in the cost of the various bins.  LED light bulbs may be using emitters from low-flux bins, as they are cheaper.  The more expensive LED light bulbs *might* be using better emitters.
 
2013-03-07 04:16:05 PM  

ElusiveWookiee: chimp_ninja: ElusiveWookiee: CFLs are the ones that leach a carcinogenic gas when they are on.

Um, no.

Um, OK.

But the German scientists claimed that several carcinogenic chemicals and toxins were released when the environmentally-friendly compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were switched on, including phenol, naphthalene and styrene.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8462626/Energy-saving-light-bulbs- co ntain-cancer-causing-chemicals.html


That report seems be the only existence of "Andreas Kirchner" and the "Federation of German Engineers".

I call BS.
 
2013-03-07 04:18:44 PM  

Easy Reader: One day I'll say, "Grandson, there was a day when Christmas lights were beautiful."


Incandescent electronic Christmas lights were a cheap knockoff of paraffin  wax candles, which where a cheap knockoff of tallow candles, which were a cheap knock off of pitch torches.

Sorry you never got to experience the real thing.
 
2013-03-07 04:20:12 PM  
flashlights with cree bulbs are farking AWESOME!
/just wanted to say that
 
2013-03-07 04:20:39 PM  

Kazan: the_sidewinder: Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.

If you really hate that, the article points out that the 60w equivalent will also be available in a Daylight variety

i've got 1500lumen 5000k CFLs that only use like 23w so i'm set for a while.


Just had one of the four I have in the office die. Only about six months of use. Wiring is fine. I checked the whole house when we moved in and had to repair around 25% of the outlets and light-boxes.

I'll probably get some of Cree's outdoor spots for where I have motion detectors. CFLs and incandescents just don't last.
 
2013-03-07 04:21:05 PM  

Kazan: vpb: I suspect they just don't like change.

yes.

RexTalionis: Because people like warmer colors and that warmer lighting is easier on the eyes.

but.. but.. that's not warmer! that's a colder black body equivalent!!!

:P (yes i know "warm color palette" vs "actual black body temperature")

I also disagree, that piss yellow light is dim, makes everything look like crap and is just generally ugly.


Agreed. I loved GE's Reveal incandescents, which had all the power usage of the inc., plus the sterile lighting of the first gen CFLs.  Weird, but the best lit rooms I ever had.
 
2013-03-07 04:26:35 PM  
Anyone want to weigh in on what should be considered a good CRI?
 
2013-03-07 04:26:57 PM  

natazha: Only about six months of use


i'd never had a CFL have that short of a lifespan until i left some of the contractor installed off brand cheapo shiats in places in the house i cared less about the off color/dim lighting.

i still have Philips ones from 2003 that work fine elsewhere..
 
2013-03-07 04:31:00 PM  

ElusiveWookiee: But the German scientists claimed that several carcinogenic chemicals and toxins were released when the environmentally-friendly compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were switched on, including phenol, naphthalene and styrene.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8462626/Energy-saving-light-bulbs- co ntain-cancer-causing-chemicals.html


1) Fun fact: Phenol is the active ingredient in Chloraseptic, which is approved to spray into the mouths of adults and children.  Not a carcinogen.
2) Naphthalene is the active ingredient in mothballs.  The dosages that cause harm are extremely high-- generally from children eating them.
3) Styrene is not a carcinogen.
4) Why can't I find this study?  Why are no details provided?  Why is it that when I search for the "Federation of German Engineers" it only returns this "study"?
5) Where are the chemicals coming from?  How much is emitted?  How does this amount compare to the emissions associated with the higher power requirements of the incandescent it replaces?

Looks like you're just doing the old "FW: FW: FW: FW:" of some Jenny-Mcarthy-level scaremongering.  I'm skeptical.
 
2013-03-07 04:34:08 PM  

chimp_ninja: ElusiveWookiee: But the German scientists claimed that several carcinogenic chemicals and toxins were released when the environmentally-friendly compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were switched on, including phenol, naphthalene and styrene.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8462626/Energy-saving-light-bulbs- co ntain-cancer-causing-chemicals.html

1) Fun fact: Phenol is the active ingredient in Chloraseptic, which is approved to spray into the mouths of adults and children.  Not a carcinogen.
2) Naphthalene is the active ingredient in mothballs.  The dosages that cause harm are extremely high-- generally from children eating them.
3) Styrene is not a carcinogen.
4) Why can't I find this study?  Why are no details provided?  Why is it that when I search for the "Federation of German Engineers" it only returns this "study"?
5) Where are the chemicals coming from?  How much is emitted?  How does this amount compare to the emissions associated with the higher power requirements of the incandescent it replaces?

Looks like you're just doing the old "FW: FW: FW: FW:" of some Jenny-Mcarthy-level scaremongering.  I'm skeptical.


But it's Yoorupean.  They do everything better.
 
2013-03-07 04:36:51 PM  

ChubbyTiger: Anyone want to weigh in on what should be considered a good CRI?


I personally look for nothing lower that 80 for general lighting, higher if I can where colour matters more (like where you get dressed, shave, eat)
 
2013-03-07 04:42:41 PM  

Cewley: Great idea: low watt usage.  Fark: will never last the warranty period, but long enough for you to lose the receipt. TotalFark: 60w bulb doesn't provide enough light to read by.


You need a cataract checkup.
 
2013-03-07 04:43:28 PM  

timujin: loonatic112358: Dazrin: H31N0US: No thanks, you can keep your libtard non-american light bulbs. If monofilement was good enough for Thomas Edison, it's good enough for me.

Cree is an American company.

/I know, I know...

I can't find the location of manufacture on the bulbs from their website, I guess to find that out I'll have to go to Home Depot and look at the box

They have facilities in Hong Kong and Huizhou, China.  One is an LED manufacturing plant, the other a chip and component manufacturing plant.  However, they also purchased Ruud Lighting in Racine, WI back in 2011 and have added a significant workforce to their Durham, NC plant.  My guess would be manufactured in China and assembled in the U.S. so that they can get TAA compliance, but that is just a guess.


I think this is the case. I was disappointed they don't mention the manufacturing location on their site, esp since they are an American company.  I could see an American flag on the HD website, but the text was fuzzy.  Found a pic of the back of the package on The Verge, has a flag says "Assembled in America", so I guess you're right.
 
2013-03-07 04:44:16 PM  

Cyrorm: Home Depot already has LED lights for under $10 from EcoSmart, and they are the same price pojnts as Cree and have a 50k hour rating on them instead of 25k and they too are already energy star compliant.  Cree is offering nothing new, slightly worse product for the same cost and this is big exciting news why?


Because Obama
 
2013-03-07 04:46:35 PM  
I work at Home Depot and I find this hilarious.  No really I do...best job ever...
 
2013-03-07 04:48:05 PM  
Ugh, I hate the yellow-orange incandescent color. It's so weird. Why do old people love that so much?
 
2013-03-07 04:48:33 PM  
another thought...maybe this will make Philips slash the price of Hue by 50% amIrite?  eh?  eh?  aw....
 
2013-03-07 04:49:28 PM  
This light bulb thread is geekier than any Linux thread I've seen. :-)
 
2013-03-07 04:55:52 PM  

InmanRoshi: Easy Reader: One day I'll say, "Grandson, there was a day when Christmas lights were beautiful."

Incandescent electronic Christmas lights were a cheap knockoff of paraffin  wax candles, which where a cheap knockoff of tallow candles, which were a cheap knock off of pitch torches.  Sorry you never got to experience the real thing.


Pitch torches!  What is this wizardry you speak of?  Back in my day, we burned dry wood, and we liked it.  And then you "pitch liberals" came with your fire codes and your War on Christmas.

(Mmm.  Burning tallow.)
 
2013-03-07 04:56:56 PM  

ElusiveWookiee: But the German scientists claimed that several carcinogenic chemicals and toxins were released when the environmentally-friendly compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were switched on, including phenol, naphthalene and styrene.


If so, it's probably coming from hot electronic components on the circuit board. I wouldn't expect much difference between CFLs and LEDs, and in either case I doubt it releases a significant quantity.

I haven't seen anyone in this thread mention halogen incandescents yet. They meet the new efficiency standards, look good, and are a nice middle ground for anyone who hates the crap CFL/LED bulbs but doesn't have time to scour the Internet to find a decent one.
 
2013-03-07 05:07:44 PM  

Cyrorm: Home Depot already has LED lights for under $10 from EcoSmart, and they are the same price pojnts as Cree and have a 50k hour rating on them instead of 25k and they too are already energy star compliant.  Cree is offering nothing new, slightly worse product for the same cost and this is big exciting news why?


Did you mean this $20, 25K hour life, 12W bulb?  Or this $10, 8K hour life, 14W bulb?
 
2013-03-07 05:09:28 PM  
Does anyone know if the globes can be removed from these new LED bulbs, as with the one shown in the article?  I figure if you have a diffuser in the lighting fixture, you can reduce light loss and let the LED's run cooler by taking the globe off.
 
2013-03-07 05:12:41 PM  

chimp_ninja: Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: Until you break one on the carpet and you have to spend the next four hours on the floor with duct tape because the vacuum cleaner will cause any spilled mercury to go airborne.  Seriously, cleaning up a broken CFL is a colossal PITA.

This always comes up, but I've seriously never broken a light bulb.

I mean, older TVs have nasty stuff in them, but it was never a problem because I don't play racquetball in my living room.


Uhmm. Older TVs, even TUBE  (50-70's) sets, don't have nasty stuff in them. If you break a tube, all you have is glass to clean up.
 
2013-03-07 05:13:43 PM  

ChubbyTiger: Anyone want to weigh in on what should be considered a good CRI?


Usually CRI above 80 is considered good, but one must understand what effects CRI. CRI is a metric of color shift under a particular lamp with 100 being no noticeable shift in color. There are many things that effect color shift. Color temperature effects CRI but it is also dependent on light intensity. Color temperature is the temperature of an ideal black object that gives off that color of light. The higher the temperature the bluer and whiter the light, the lower the temperature the lower the more yellow the light.

The higher temperature the lamp, the more intense the light will need to be to offer good color rendering. At low intensity, high temperature lamps will give a noticeable blue hue color shift. At high insensity low color temperature lamps will give off a noticeable yellow color shift.

In spaces one wishes to have lower lighting levels, lower temperature lamps will offer the best rendering. Spaces in which one wants higher light levels, high temperature lamps should be used. Some places, you want both like a dinning room in your house. You want low intensity when eating but higher intensity when using your dining room table as a work table. Some commercial LED manufacturers make color temperature shift fixtures that shift the color color temperature as the intensity is adjusted with a dimmer.

Age also effects color temperature preference. As people get older they wish to have high light intensity so the preference high temperature lamps goes up.

Of course there is also personal preference. I'm still young and my eyes are still in good shape so I prefer lower intensity lighting with lower color temperature. I wouldn't put anything over a 60W equivalent in my house with my preference being 40W equivalents.
 
2013-03-07 05:17:57 PM  

chimp_ninja: Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: Until you break one on the carpet and you have to spend the next four hours on the floor with duct tape because the vacuum cleaner will cause any spilled mercury to go airborne.  Seriously, cleaning up a broken CFL is a colossal PITA.

This always comes up, but I've seriously never broken a light bulb.

I mean, older TVs have nasty stuff in them, but it was never a problem because I don't play racquetball in my living room.


and as a addition to the breaking bulb problem. there are these things called children...

and pets.
 
2013-03-07 05:24:49 PM  

Artcurus: Uhmm. Older TVs, even TUBE (50-70's) sets, don't have nasty stuff in them. If you break a tube, all you have is glass to clean up.


Depends on when it was manufactured.  A lot of older CRTs have cadmium or yttrium phosphors.  You wouldn't leave them lying around if a breakage happened.

It's certainly not "just glass", because that wouldn't make colors.  These issues are present in LEDs and other modern displays as well, which is part of why many communities have dedicated electronics recycling now in order to keep those metals out of groundwater/etc.
 
2013-03-07 05:27:08 PM  
Since we're sharing, I'll offer my favorites:
Sylvania micro-mini, soft white 2700K instant-on CFL bulbs, 100W-equivalent (23W actual). A good mimic to incandescent. I installed a 3-bulb floor lamp with these CFLs to replace a single-bulb torchiere-style that was using whopping 300W incandescent. The brightness/color change was slight and I'm happy with it.
For a whiter/daylight look, same brand but 6500K. I have these in the laundry room.
I wouldn't quite go with "instant" on, but they do warm up quickly enough.
 
2013-03-07 05:32:59 PM  

tom baker's scarf: Samwise Gamgee: RexTalionis: vpb: Kazan: 2700K? Aka "Incandescent Piss-tinge"? fark that shiat.

I have never understood why people claim they like that dingy yellow light.  I suspect they just don't like change.

Because people like warmer colors and that warmer lighting is easier on the eyes.

I know I do... I'm using those yellow bug lights in my floor lamps at home. It feels like I'm in Deus Ex.

great, now i want to play DeusEx.  Thanks so farking much.


Just get some yellow light bulbs :)
 
2013-03-07 05:55:39 PM  

jfarkinB: These particular bulbs would be exactly the wrong thing to use, but I'll bet an LED bulb designed for a can would have even more of an efficiency advantage over incandescent -- you'd just point all the chips downward, and you wouldn't need a rear reflector and its attendant inefficiency. You'd need to make sure the heat can escape from the can, though.


Tou WOULD think that. But I can't find any such thing.

I am an engineer so I know a little about specs (like looking at the lumens and not the marketing bs of "wattage equivalent") and I haven't found any reflector bulbs or replacement modules that approach a 100 watt R40. The brightest I found fall short of that and most of them are focused like a pin spotlight (probably to increase perceived brightness).   (they also need to be dimmable, or I end up spending even more to replace dimmers w/ switches)

If you know of such a device I would consider it a kindness for you to post it here.
 
2013-03-07 05:57:39 PM  

the_sidewinder: SpectroBoy: Wake me when the LED bulb market can match at least a 100 watt incandescent output. My house has many built in ceiling "can lights" and there are only so many of them. They currently have 100-120 watt bulbs. 60 watt equivalent ain't gonna cut it.

Reflectors, or omnidirectional?


Reflectors (R-40s). And I need a wide flood light not a narrow spot (like many of the LEDs).

Right now I have some fairly bright CF R-40s with a good pattern and decent brightness. The problems with them are
A) Slow warm up time is annoying and rules them out for bathrooms or kitchens for us
B) They don;t really dim well. The go from 100% to 80% then out.
 
2013-03-07 06:00:20 PM  

Shazam999: jfarkinB: SpectroBoy: Wake me when the LED bulb market can match at least a 100 watt incandescent output. My house has many built in ceiling "can lights" and there are only so many of them. They currently have 100-120 watt bulbs. 60 watt equivalent ain't gonna cut it.

These particular bulbs would be exactly the wrong thing to use, but I'll bet an LED bulb designed for a can would have even more of an efficiency advantage over incandescent -- you'd just point all the chips downward, and you wouldn't need a rear reflector and its attendant inefficiency. You'd need to make sure the heat can escape from the can, though.

Do they have these in the USA?

[w-s-express.ca image 466x432]

I have these in the kitchen and living room, and they work AWESOME.


I have never seen those before. Looks like (in the picture) they say 1350 lumens. That is probably enough (not ideal). Is the pattern wide or narrow?
 
2013-03-07 06:00:51 PM  

SpectroBoy: jfarkinB: These particular bulbs would be exactly the wrong thing to use, but I'll bet an LED bulb designed for a can would have even more of an efficiency advantage over incandescent -- you'd just point all the chips downward, and you wouldn't need a rear reflector and its attendant inefficiency. You'd need to make sure the heat can escape from the can, though.

Tou WOULD think that. But I can't find any such thing.

I am an engineer so I know a little about specs (like looking at the lumens and not the marketing bs of "wattage equivalent") and I haven't found any reflector bulbs or replacement modules that approach a 100 watt R40. The brightest I found fall short of that and most of them are focused like a pin spotlight (probably to increase perceived brightness).   (they also need to be dimmable, or I end up spending even more to replace dimmers w/ switches)

If you know of such a device I would consider it a kindness for you to post it here.


Caution PDF
 
2013-03-07 06:04:10 PM  

pciszek: Does anyone know if the globes can be removed from these new LED bulbs, as with the one shown in the article?  I figure if you have a diffuser in the lighting fixture, you can reduce light loss and let the LED's run cooler by taking the globe off.


There is no reason to do this. Good LED bulb have decent heat sinks already, the LEDs themselves don't get hot, likewise, the diffuser doesn't get hot, either. I've got one right here at my computer desk (clip-on desk lamp), and it isn't hot at all - not even the metal hood around the heat sink is warm, and it's been on all day. As for the quality of the light, with LED bulbs it is all about diffusing the light... otherwise, you just end up with spotty, focused light.

I really don't understand why people have all these crazy ideas, and they've never even tried them out. Spend $8 and get one to try out.

I've been running the Inlands I mentioned above for over a year now and I've got no complaints about them, other than I have to gradually upgrade because they are still relatively expensive.
 
2013-03-07 06:05:29 PM  

SpectroBoy: Shazam999: jfarkinB: SpectroBoy: Wake me when the LED bulb market can match at least a 100 watt incandescent output. My house has many built in ceiling "can lights" and there are only so many of them. They currently have 100-120 watt bulbs. 60 watt equivalent ain't gonna cut it.

These particular bulbs would be exactly the wrong thing to use, but I'll bet an LED bulb designed for a can would have even more of an efficiency advantage over incandescent -- you'd just point all the chips downward, and you wouldn't need a rear reflector and its attendant inefficiency. You'd need to make sure the heat can escape from the can, though.

Do they have these in the USA?

[w-s-express.ca image 466x432]

I have these in the kitchen and living room, and they work AWESOME.

I have never seen those before. Looks like (in the picture) they say 1350 lumens. That is probably enough (not ideal). Is the pattern wide or narrow?


It's wide.  Just as good, if not better, than the CFLs they replaced in terms of dispersal.  Far better in terms of actual light output and of course basically perfect instant-on.

And 1350 lumens isn't good enough?  Are you wearing sunglasses in your house?
 
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