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(NBC News)   The price for two years of being kept in a New Mexico prison in solitary without a trial? $15.5 million   (usnews.nbcnews.com) divider line 177
    More: Followup, New Mexico, first receiver, NBC News  
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12876 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Mar 2013 at 3:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-06 08:14:22 PM  
Why was he in solitary so long?
Who put him there?
Why are their heads still on their bodies?

22 months in solitary is some farked up shiat. It's worse than waterboarding or most physical tortures. It can easily break people you'd think are unbreakable.

The execution of those responsible is a good first step in a civilized society. Justice would be sending them to solitary for 22 months themselves, but I can't endorse such cruelty.
 
2013-03-06 08:20:58 PM  
If I had any say in the matter this gentleman would have received a minimum of $30 million. There is absolutely no reason to do that to anyone.
 
2013-03-06 08:21:15 PM  
Those who were responsible for this should be put on trial.

Simple as that.
 
2013-03-06 08:23:39 PM  
Wow America, you're supposed to be better than that. There really should be a few punished here, start with the Warden in solitary for two years...
 
2013-03-06 08:42:30 PM  

cman: Those who were responsible for this should be put on trial.

Simple as that.


Completely agree with you there. I'm stunned they kept a man in solitary without a trial for two years.
 
2013-03-06 08:44:19 PM  

AirForceVet: cman: Those who were responsible for this should be put on trial.

Simple as that.

Completely agree with you there. I'm stunned they kept a man in solitary without a trial for two years.


Have you ever been falsely accused of something? Guilty until proven innocent, man.
 
2013-03-06 08:46:44 PM  
Wow, you could put a hit on a third-world dictator with that kind of money.
 
2013-03-06 08:48:42 PM  
The before and after photo is beyond sad (left to right it is after then before) They f*cked him up.

msnbcmedia.msn.com
 
2013-03-06 08:51:30 PM  
Everyone at the jail who knew about this guy, or should have reasonably known about this guy, should be sentenced to a completely random amount of time in jail, ranging from 22 months to forever.  While in prison, they should be forced to work for twenty cents an hour, and every month they should be forced to sign their paycheck over to this guy's account.  For the rest of their lives.  And it should be mandatory viewing for every jail employee in the country, as an example of what they will experience if they intentionally violate an inmate's civil rights in this fashion.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-06 08:57:35 PM  
the case was not about how much money he could make, his attorney said, but about getting recognition of how poorly he was treated and the scars he still has.

As a general rule, the court system should take lawyers' "it's not about the money" statements as binding and cut awards to $1 nominal damages with a maximum of 30 cents in attorney's fees.

According to the earlier article: Dona Ana County officials were tight-lipped about the case, refusing to answer questions about whether any jail employees were reprimanded or fired over Slevin's treatment.
 
2013-03-06 09:11:54 PM  
"All the justice you can afford."
 
2013-03-06 09:21:03 PM  
Privatize and SAVE!

Oopsie.

(just guessing)
 
2013-03-06 09:24:37 PM  

AirForceVet: I'm stunned they kept a man in solitary without a trial for two years.


I'm not.  This kind of thing isn't that uncommon.  People with mental illnesses almost always end up in jails these days, thanks to the budget cutting mantra taking away mental institutions for the average person.  Those mentally unstable people almost always end up in solitary confinement for years.  They eventually get brain fried enough that they're taken to temp psych counseling and temporarily fixed, and then once they're good enough promptly thrown back in jail to cycle downwards again.

This is what you get when people only take the cheap route because stupid people think the solution to everything is tax cuts.
 
2013-03-06 09:38:00 PM  
I say it all the time, but the wrongly imprisoned should get much better compensation than they do, and the people responsible should be financially burdened for some of that compensation. Not just all paid by the tax payers.

/but that just makes the ticks dig in more
//and work to keep things covered up
///and never discovered
 
2013-03-06 09:39:21 PM  
The sad part (other than the infuriating way in which this man was treated) is that the taxpayers of NM are going to be on the hook for the money & more than likely nothing will happen to anyone involved in this whole affair (perhaps a low man on the totem pole sacrificial lamb, but nobody in authority).  The warden, the guards who worked his cell block, EVERYONE who had any sort of contact with him over the time he was there need to be help personally liable for the monetary damages.  Once they are personally bankrupt & in jail themselves then the taxpayers can make up the difference.

Such beyond the pale abuse of anyone's civil rights, in a just society, would come with capital punishment for those involved.
 
2013-03-06 09:49:25 PM  
shiat. There are days I'd pay to be locked in solitary.
 
2013-03-06 09:56:00 PM  
While the treatment he received was truly horrible, I don't get how it began in the first place.  How is it he was never processed through the system correctly?  How is it he never saw a judge?  Didn't the warden see his paperwork when he came in?  Didn't he tell someone "Hey, I never got my one phone call"?  Something??
 
2013-03-06 10:01:42 PM  
My question would be what justification they had to keep him in prison for 22 months without trial. He was obviously denied access to a lawyer. I'm not generally in favor of budget buster lawsuits (especially when people say it's not about the money), but this one is completely deserved. I can't imagine the kind of hell he went through.

GAT_00: AirForceVet: I'm stunned they kept a man in solitary without a trial for two years.

I'm not.  This kind of thing isn't that uncommon.  People with mental illnesses almost always end up in jails these days, thanks to the budget cutting mantra taking away mental institutions for the average person.  Those mentally unstable people almost always end up in solitary confinement for years.  They eventually get brain fried enough that they're taken to temp psych counseling and temporarily fixed, and then once they're good enough promptly thrown back in jail to cycle downwards again.

This is what you get when people only take the cheap route because stupid people think the solution to everything is tax cuts.


Don't necessarily blame budget cuts for this, though those are a big part. During the late 70's and early 80's, there was a huge movement to reduce the amount of involuntary inpatient treatment for the severely mentally ill (commitment). This despite the fact that many of them need it. Nowadays it is far harder to do so, leaving prisons as the main place these people are confined to.
 
2013-03-06 10:12:01 PM  

timujin: While the treatment he received was truly horrible, I don't get how it began in the first place.  How is it he was never processed through the system correctly?  How is it he never saw a judge?  Didn't the warden see his paperwork when he came in?  Didn't he tell someone "Hey, I never got my one phone call"?  Something??


You never dealt with cops on the business end, have you?

I had to deal with 100 days of breathalyzers, piss tests, and house arrest for the grand and despicable crime of being innocent of any crime.

I met a couple cops then. In their eyes, I was a crimnal. Crimnals ain't people. Sure accused citizens and even convicted criminals have legals rights, but you're not a criminal you're a crimnal. Crimnals go in the box, because they're crimnals. It was some Cool Hand Luke shiat. And that's without any evidence whatsoever except a false accusation.

I can imagine how much worse I'd have been treated if there'd actually been a prosecutor involved. 100 days of hell for me was just a tiny spark jumping randomly off the static around the legal system. This guy caught the full thunder.
 
2013-03-06 10:12:53 PM  

dahmers love zombie: Everyone at the jail who knew about this guy, or should have reasonably known about this guy, should be sentenced to a completely random amount of time in jail, ranging from 22 months to forever.  While in prison, they should be forced to work for twenty cents an hour, and every month they should be forced to sign their paycheck over to this guy's account.  For the rest of their lives.  And it should be mandatory viewing for every jail employee in the country, as an example of what they will experience if they intentionally violate an inmate's civil rights in this fashion.


This. Until the people who actually perpetrate these things -- including the people who either actively cover it up or knew and say nothing -- are punished, nothing will change.
 
2013-03-06 10:22:49 PM  

timujin: While the treatment he received was truly horrible, I don't get how it began in the first place.  How is it he was never processed through the system correctly?  How is it he never saw a judge?  Didn't the warden see his paperwork when he came in?  Didn't he tell someone "Hey, I never got my one phone call"?  Something??


I'm not saying it's true, but his mental illness could be a factor in not demanding an attorney or standing up for himself. But I can't imagine a reason that he would not have been arraigned and appointed a lawyer if the charge was auto theft. I also see no reason whatsoever for him to have been put in solitary in the first place.

I am appalled that anyone who knew he was there did nothing about it. That includes his "friends and his sister" although they might have been used to him disappearing for years at a time. What about the car that was supposed to stolen? I'm also not sure how much blame the guards deserve. The seldom know that details of any case, they just know that it was decided by people who are supposed to make those decisions. It's not necessarily something that they would know about. Of course that has nothing at all to do with him not getting his yard time or medical/dental care, not to mention basic hygiene issues like showers, haircuts, nails trimmed etc....
 
2013-03-06 10:25:46 PM  
I recall a small building at BRCI that sat away from everything else with just a tiny parking lot.  I asked my dad about it and he said it was a prison consisting of nothing but 16 solitary confinement cells.  I asked why it was away from the other prisons.  He said those guys are put there permanently after proving they cannot be around any person for any amount of time.  Basically Hannibal Lecter types.  Atleast those guys had a trial and really got violent enough times while serving time in a regular prison.  I would hope they don't let their health get to be that bad like the guy in this story.

/for some reason, SC built over a half dozen prisons all close together then put a fence around all of them.
//after going through the main gate, you see a women's prison then you see minimum security men's prisons.  After a ways, you eventually come to the max. security facilities like Kirtland and then Broad River facility which the whole thing is named after.
///the max. sec. prisons do have their own fencing.
 
2013-03-06 10:32:39 PM  

ArkAngel: Don't necessarily blame budget cuts for this, though those are a big part. During the late 70's and early 80's, there was a huge movement to reduce the amount of involuntary inpatient treatment for the severely mentally ill (commitment). This despite the fact that many of them need it. Nowadays it is far harder to do so, leaving prisons as the main place these people are confined to.


It's more that they'll eventually end up there I think.  I don't think that it was intentional to throw the mentally ill into prison, I simply think that nobody who thought cutting those budgets to pieces ever thought about the consequences of it other than "Woo hoo, we saved some money, now we can cut taxes and everything is better."  Nobody ever considered the consequences of all of this.  The mentally ill are far more likely to commit crimes simply because the actions they end up taking aren't rational and end up often in violation of the law.  We no longer can treat them anywhere except prison for far too many of them, so they're thrown in jail.  Sure they'll get some mental health there, but once they are released they have no way of keeping on their drugs.  None.  How are they supposed to pay for those drugs?  They can't.  So they eventually fall ill again, do something they don't realize is wrong, and end up back in jail.

It's an endless and completely breakable cycle of stupid.  But we won't do it.  Why not?  Because it'll cost money, and no matter how much better it will make the country as a whole - a year of mental health drugs and a now productive member of society FAR, FAR outweigh the cost of a year of prison care plus mental health drugs - because to pay for it we'd have to raise taxes, and then the stupid brigade throws a farking hissy fit because they don't understand that shiat needs to be paid for.  They just want their free stuff so they can call everyone else a socialist.

And that's just one of the many reason I farking loathe the libertarian, all taxes are bad bullshiat.  It completely disregards any consequences of their actions.
 
2013-03-06 10:34:04 PM  

lack of warmth: Atleast those guys had a trial and really got violent enough times while serving time in a regular prison. I would hope they don't let their health get to be that bad like the guy in this story.


There are plenty of documentaries you can find that show that yes, they are exactly like this guy.

A Frontline many of you need to watch if you're outraged by this: The New Asylums.
 
2013-03-07 12:12:30 AM  

doglover: Why was he in solitary so long?
Who put him there?
Why are their heads still on their bodies?

22 months in solitary is some farked up shiat. It's worse than waterboarding or most physical tortures. It can easily break people you'd think are unbreakable.

The execution of those responsible is a good first step in a civilized society. Justice would be sending them to solitary for 22 months themselves, but I can't endorse such cruelty.


THIS
FARKING THIS!
and yet no one was arrested? no one was charged with a felony?
kidnapping and attempted murder??

was the DA in on this? do the FEDS need to get involved??
/I hate these people with every once of my soul
/which admittedly, I sold to the devil
 
2013-03-07 12:35:20 AM  
A standard trial. If they are found guilty, they get 24 hours to draft a last will and testament and say goodbye. Then they're given the option to be marched to the gallows.

If they refuse, they are taken to solitary somewhere, in a cell with no windows so they can't cpunt the days. Nutra loaf, water, and that's it. No visitors, no lawyers, no medical care. Secret length of time (22 months, but don't tell them that.)

Honestly, I think all the prison officials responsible would choose death over that.
 
2013-03-07 12:37:54 AM  

Recoil Therapy: The sad part (other than the infuriating way in which this man was treated) is that the taxpayers of NM are going to be on the hook for the money & more than likely nothing will happen to anyone involved in this whole affair (perhaps a low man on the totem pole sacrificial lamb, but nobody in authority).  The warden, the guards who worked his cell block, EVERYONE who had any sort of contact with him over the time he was there need to be help personally liable for the monetary damages.  Once they are personally bankrupt & in jail themselves then the taxpayers can make up the difference.

Such beyond the pale abuse of anyone's civil rights, in a just society, would come with capital punishment for those involved.


the people holding this man illegally broke a large number of laws and should be charged with multiple felonies. period.
they should do some hard time.

anyone unclear on what laws were broken ... well ....sigh
start with the US constitution
then read about a speedy trial
 
2013-03-07 12:39:47 AM  
I wish I expected to see the people that are pissed off about US citizens being assassinated in drone strikes also take up this guy's cause.
 
2013-03-07 12:51:02 AM  
He should have taken up geology... and a big goddamn poster.

/pressure and time
 
2013-03-07 12:58:19 AM  
 
2013-03-07 01:08:27 AM  
22 months in solitary?

WITHOUT TRIAL, OR EVEN CHARGES???

It could happen to you.

ACLU:

"In December 2011, President Obama signed the 2012 NDAA, codifying indefinite military detention without charge or trial into law for the first time in American history. The NDAA's dangerous detention provisions would authorize the president - and all future presidents - to order the military to pick up and indefinitely imprison people captured anywhere in the world, far from any battlefied."


Yes, that's it.
And it's all perfectly legal.
Citizen.


/God bless America
 
2013-03-07 01:23:23 AM  
 
2013-03-07 01:38:48 AM  
"Their policy is to then just put them in solitary" if they appear to have mental health issues, Coyte told NBC News.

not, you know, have them screened by a mental health worker?
 
2013-03-07 02:03:49 AM  

log_jammin: "Their policy is to then just put them in solitary" if they appear to have mental health issues, Coyte told NBC News.

not, you know, have them screened by a mental health worker?


This is why the man who calls the legal system a "justice" system is a great fool. No justice there but by happy accident.
 
2013-03-07 02:06:48 AM  

namatad: doglover: Why was he in solitary so long?
Who put him there?
Why are their heads still on their bodies?

22 months in solitary is some farked up shiat. It's worse than waterboarding or most physical tortures. It can easily break people you'd think are unbreakable.

The execution of those responsible is a good first step in a civilized society. Justice would be sending them to solitary for 22 months themselves, but I can't endorse such cruelty.

THIS
FARKING THIS!
and yet no one was arrested? no one was charged with a felony?
kidnapping and attempted murder??

was the DA in on this?
do the FEDS need to get involved??
/I hate these people with every once of my soul
/which admittedly, I sold to the devil


The DA at them time is the Gov now.
 
2013-03-07 02:36:30 AM  

violentsalvation: The DA at them time is the Gov now.


Was he involved? That's the key.

brumshiretales.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-07 03:17:33 AM  
Sign me up!

I'll do two years of solitary for $15.5M.  Hell yes.
 
2013-03-07 03:38:47 AM  
Wait, there's a New Mexico?
 
2013-03-07 03:39:33 AM  
New Mexico is giving Arizona a run for their own tag.
 
2013-03-07 03:52:44 AM  

Recoil Therapy: The sad part (other than the infuriating way in which this man was treated) is that the taxpayers of NM are going to be on the hook for the money & more than likely nothing will happen to anyone involved in this whole affair (perhaps a low man on the totem pole sacrificial lamb, but nobody in authority).  The warden, the guards who worked his cell block, EVERYONE who had any sort of contact with him over the time he was there need to be help personally liable for the monetary damages.  Once they are personally bankrupt & in jail themselves then the taxpayers can make up the difference.

Such beyond the pale abuse of anyone's civil rights, in a just society, would come with capital punishment for those involved.


Yes - and we should start with their pension funds, they do not deserve them.
 
2013-03-07 03:54:57 AM  
"...no jail personnel have been fired over Slevin's treatment."

That's what's wrong with the system. Elect me and people who pull this kind of crap will be put up against a wall and their brains blown out the back of their useless heads, on live TV.
 
2013-03-07 03:55:08 AM  

L.D. Ablo: Sign me up!

I'll do two years of solitary for $15.5M.  Hell yes.


Thirty days with no idea whether you would ever be released would wreck you.
 
2013-03-07 03:57:24 AM  

sno man: Wow America, you're supposed to be better than that.


But we ain't.  We've got as many lying bastards, slimewads and dick squeezing sadists as the Gestapo, the Kremlin or some banana farm dictator ever had.
 
2013-03-07 03:59:51 AM  

L.D. Ablo: Sign me up!

I'll do two years of solitary for $15.5M.  Hell yes.


You say that now, but people have suffered psychological problems from as little as 3 days in solitary. We're social animals and we need some kind of mental stimulation or our brains start to fail.

This guy is probably never gonna be all there, mentally.
 
2013-03-07 04:05:53 AM  

Gunther: L.D. Ablo: Sign me up!

I'll do two years of solitary for $15.5M.  Hell yes.

You say that now, but people have suffered psychological problems from as little as 3 days in solitary. We're social animals and we need some kind of mental stimulation or our brains start to fail.


Well, they give you Fark in jail, don't they?
 
2013-03-07 04:06:48 AM  

L.D. Ablo: Sign me up!

I'll do two years of solitary for $15.5M.  Hell yes.


I wish I had the money to see just how badly you would regret that decision in two years. If you were even mentally capable of having regret, or any other emotion, afterwards.
 
2013-03-07 04:08:46 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: Gunther: L.D. Ablo: Sign me up!

I'll do two years of solitary for $15.5M.  Hell yes.

You say that now, but people have suffered psychological problems from as little as 3 days in solitary. We're social animals and we need some kind of mental stimulation or our brains start to fail.

Well, they give you Fark in jail, don't they?


Not in solitary.
 
2013-03-07 04:26:57 AM  

cman: Those who were responsible for this should be put on trial.

Simple as that.


No trials and no one was fired.
 
2013-03-07 04:27:06 AM  
And no one responsible will suffer meaningful consequences.
 
2013-03-07 04:27:26 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: Well, they give you Fark in jail, don't they?


Probably not the kind of fark you want.
 
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