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(NPR)   Mississippi legalizes home brewing, leaving only Alabama as the last state where home-swillery is illegal   (npr.org) divider line 72
    More: Spiffy, Mississippi, Alabama, home brewing, academic degrees  
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2788 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Mar 2013 at 9:18 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-06 09:22:57 PM  
Wow, ending slavery and legalizing home brewing, it's been a big month for Mississippitucky.
 
2013-03-06 09:22:57 PM  
I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.
 
2013-03-06 09:23:17 PM  
Small government conservatism.
 
2013-03-06 09:25:19 PM  
It's legal as far as the Feds are concerned, but it's not federally protected. However, even if it is illegal here, it is not enforced.
 
2013-03-06 09:25:37 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.


Dear Right Wing Troll; read the Constitution some time.  This is covered explicitly.
 
2013-03-06 09:27:43 PM  
Welcome, brother and sisters, to the glorious world of homebrewing.
 
2013-03-06 09:28:30 PM  
Huzzah! Mississippi just got marginally better to live near!
 
2013-03-06 09:28:31 PM  
Georgia only legalized it once they got the nod to host the Olympics and realized that they couldn't open any brewpubs for the massive influx of visitors to enjoy.

/used to belong to the Covert Hops Society
 
2013-03-06 09:30:59 PM  
"We are opposed to all alcohol liberalization bills," executive director Joe Godfrey <a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.abc3340.com/story/21190241/home-brew-b ill-to-go-before-legi slature">tells Birmingham's ABC 33/40. "Alcohol is a mind bending, addictive drug. It has an addictive nature to it. It destroys families, it destroys lives, it's bad for our culture and our society and it's been proven over and over again."

Hey, Cletus.
Tell us what you really think. That brewing requires SCIENCE and is therefore biblically EVIL.
 
2013-03-06 09:33:30 PM  
I thought them folks down there was opposed to Sharia Law. Surprised this was on their books to begin with.
 
2013-03-06 09:35:26 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.


FTA: "It wasn't until 1978 that homebrewing became legal under federal law, after a grass-roots effort produced a bill that was signed into law by President Carter. "

Try reading for comprehension next time.
 
2013-03-06 09:38:34 PM  
 
2013-03-06 09:43:07 PM  
Paging "Cerebral Knievel"
 
2013-03-06 09:43:14 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.


I used to think that - but seeing how much tea-tards, hillbillies, and trailer-trash hate on him, I've been forced to conclude he must have done quite a few things  right.
 
2013-03-06 09:43:37 PM  

vudukungfu: "We are opposed to all alcohol liberalization bills," executive director Joe Godfrey <a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.abc3340.com/story/21190241/home-brew-b ill-to-go-before-legi slature">tells Birmingham's ABC 33/40. "Alcohol is a mind bending, addictive drug. It has an addictive nature to it. It destroys families, it destroys lives, it's bad for our culture and our society and it's been proven over and over again."

Hey, Cletus.
Tell us what you really think. That brewing requires SCIENCE and is therefore biblically EVIL.


The Magnolia state should totally focus on banning sins like brewing finely-crafted beer, allowing birth control devices to be sold, allowing the races to mix, suffering homaseckshuls the right to exist, etc. Then maybe Gawd Awlmighty would stop throwing hurricanes at them every year. Ya know. If they were "pure" enough.
 
2013-03-06 09:50:09 PM  

uatuba: It's legal as far as the Feds are concerned, but it's not federally protected. However, even if it is illegal here, it is not enforced.


So you're saying no black person has yet been found brewing at home?
 
2013-03-06 09:54:04 PM  
I blame the influx of soft money from Big Moonshinin'.
 
2013-03-06 10:01:00 PM  

jake_lex: What's wrong with the beer they got in Alabama? It drink pretty good, don't it?


I hate to say it, but that's pretty believable for a state rep.

/FROM JUMUNY?!
 
2013-03-06 10:04:00 PM  

vudukungfu: "We are opposed to all alcohol liberalization bills," executive director Joe Godfrey <a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.abc3340.com/story/21190241/home-brew-b ill-to-go-before-legi slature">tells Birmingham's ABC 33/40. "Alcohol is a mind bending, addictive drug. It has an addictive nature to it. It destroys families, it destroys lives, it's bad for our culture and our society and it's been proven over and over again."

Hey, Cletus.
Tell us what you really think. That brewing requires SCIENCE and is therefore biblically EVIL.


I don't think Cletus is wrong, necessarily. Alcohol wreaks all kinds of havoc...it almost killed me. But, that doesn't mean you can't enjoy it. I love(d) booze, but just can't have it anymore due to the addiction that Cletus mentioned. Farked me up real good.

/IPA and tequila were my poisons of choice. Anything with alcohol, eventually
//Sláinte
 
2013-03-06 10:04:43 PM  
No abortions after 12 weeks and no home-brew?

Man, fark Alabama with a rusty spike.
 
2013-03-06 10:10:53 PM  

BeSerious: The Stealth Hippopotamus: I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.

FTA: "It wasn't until 1978 that homebrewing became legal under federal law, after a grass-roots effort produced a bill that was signed into law by President Carter. "


What exactly made it illegal under federal law back in 78? I don't think the federal government could prevent a state from allowing its citizens to brew their own. 10th Amendment and 21st, for that matter.

Carter's best law was not applicable.
 
2013-03-06 10:11:31 PM  
Is there an actual AAA vacation guide to Alabama? Or is it just a list of the truck stops where old Republican Lynyrd Skynyrd fans tap their feet in time to "Sweet Home Alabama".
 
2013-03-06 10:11:31 PM  
BFD.

Wake me up when homedistiller.org is legal.
 
2013-03-06 10:11:41 PM  
Call me when the feds legalize distilling your own
 
2013-03-06 10:13:42 PM  

freetomato: Georgia only legalized it once they got the nod to host the Olympics and realized that they couldn't open any brewpubs for the massive influx of visitors to enjoy.

/used to belong to the Covert Hops Society


The homebrew bill was in 1993. The brewpub law was passed a year or so later. But yes it was likely passed due to Olympics-related enthusiasm.

Georgia still has to get a law passed to legalize homebrew competitions. I don't think we'll get to-go sales from breweries passed this year.

/Still in Covert Hops, since 1993
//Was even president once
 
2013-03-06 10:18:45 PM  
CSB: When I lived in NE Arkansas a zillion summers ago I asked the local boys to find a pint or two of moonshine for my last-day-before-college party.  They did.  It was clear and came in mason (canning) jars.  As a test for sufficient "proof" they splashed some on the driveway and lit it with a match.  "Yep, good 'nuf."  About a dozen of us finished six pints and lived.  It has no taste but burned like blue blazes.

During the festivities, one chap announced, "I married me a fat women to keep my balls off the floor."

No, I didn't go blind (well, not from the rot gut booze, anyway).
 
2013-03-06 10:19:52 PM  
This will come as great news to some of my friends who have been doing it for 20+ years.
 
2013-03-06 10:24:48 PM  

Noam Chimpsky: BeSerious: The Stealth Hippopotamus: I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.

FTA: "It wasn't until 1978 that homebrewing became legal under federal law, after a grass-roots effort produced a bill that was signed into law by President Carter. "

What exactly made it illegal under federal law back in 78? I don't think the federal government could prevent a state from allowing its citizens to brew their own. 10th Amendment and 21st, for that matter.

Carter's best law was not applicable.


The federal law was about federal taxes and license being required for all alcoholic beverages. The only exception written until then was for home winemaking.

And all the 21st amendment says is that the 18th is repealed and that "The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited."

This put the authority to regulate alcohol in the hands of the states, but it did not state that the feds could not have their own regulations. All breweries, wineries and distilleries have federal permits, and pay federal taxes. The homebrewing law that Carter signed granted an exception to the federal requirements for licence and taxes to homebrewers.

It would require the same sort of change to the law to allow for home distilling.
 
2013-03-06 10:26:20 PM  

rkiller1: CSB: When I lived in NE Arkansas a zillion summers ago I asked the local boys to find a pint or two of moonshine for my last-day-before-college party.  They did.  It was clear and came in mason (canning) jars.  As a test for sufficient "proof" they splashed some on the driveway and lit it with a match.  "Yep, good 'nuf."  About a dozen of us finished six pints and lived.  It has no taste but burned like blue blazes.

During the festivities, one chap announced, "I married me a fat women to keep my balls off the floor."

No, I didn't go blind (well, not from the rot gut booze, anyway).


The national election results make a lot more sense now.
 
2013-03-06 10:30:02 PM  

Noam Chimpsky: What exactly made it illegal under federal law back in 78?


Not technically illegal, but subject to federal excise tax.
 
2013-03-06 10:33:22 PM  

Ocknard: freetomato: Georgia only legalized it once they got the nod to host the Olympics and realized that they couldn't open any brewpubs for the massive influx of visitors to enjoy.

/used to belong to the Covert Hops Society

The homebrew bill was in 1993. The brewpub law was passed a year or so later. But yes it was likely passed due to Olympics-related enthusiasm.

Georgia still has to get a law passed to legalize homebrew competitions. I don't think we'll get to-go sales from breweries passed this year.

/Still in Covert Hops, since 1993
//Was even president once


I used to really enjoy those meetings, and enjoyed stewarding one competition. I quit going when I divorced my ex. In fact I miss that more than him! I credit that era for expanding my taste beyond MGD and Bud. I haven't brewed in about ten years but still am a bit of a beer snob.

The only part of Alabama I know well is Montgomery. The Civil Rights Museum, the Hank Williams Museum and The Green Lantern restaurant are about the only places outside of Maxwell AFB are the only places I've ventured. Oh, and a Biscuits baseball game. Their mascot was a giant, googly eyed biscuit with a pat of butter for a tongue.
 
2013-03-06 10:35:44 PM  
As a homebrewer living in Alabama for a few years, this makes me sad. Happy for our neighbors to the west, but sad for me.
 
2013-03-06 10:36:04 PM  
Meh. I really shouldn't fark on mobile. Can't type worth a damn.
 
2013-03-06 10:38:00 PM  
All the references to Carter and no

www.mentalfloss.com
?

/am disappoint
 
2013-03-06 10:41:59 PM  

uatuba: It's legal as far as the Feds are concerned, but it's not federally protected. However, even if it is illegal here, it is not enforced.


It was always fun when I went back home and visited Lazy Magnolia, since they will sell people hops and barley.

I asked what they were selling it for, since home brewing was illegal.

They responded that they didn't know, but people wanted to buy the stuff so they'd sell it.
 
2013-03-06 10:46:59 PM  

jso2897: The Stealth Hippopotamus: I thought Carter made it federal law?!

I take it back. Carter didn't do a single thing right.

I used to think that - but seeing how much tea-tards, hillbillies, and trailer-trash hate on him, I've been forced to conclude he must have done quite a few things  right.


So, you change your opinion based on what other people think of someone?

I'm so sorry you're stupid.
 
2013-03-06 10:49:11 PM  

Delay: Is there an actual AAA vacation guide to Alabama? Or is it just a list of the truck stops where old Republican Lynyrd Skynyrd fans tap their feet in time to "Sweet Home Alabama".


So is being  a bigot something you learned as a scientist, or does it just come naturally?
 
2013-03-06 10:56:50 PM  

Watching_Epoxy_Cure: Delay: Is there an actual AAA vacation guide to Alabama? Or is it just a list of the truck stops where old Republican Lynyrd Skynyrd fans tap their feet in time to "Sweet Home Alabama".

So is being  a bigot something you learned as a scientist, or does it just come naturally?


Bigotry is an art, not a science.
 
2013-03-06 11:03:24 PM  
Meanwhile ...

hempbeach.com
 
2013-03-06 11:04:29 PM  

Delay: rkiller1: CSB: When I lived in NE Arkansas a zillion summers ago I asked the local boys to find a pint or two of moonshine for my last-day-before-college party.  They did.  It was clear and came in mason (canning) jars.  As a test for sufficient "proof" they splashed some on the driveway and lit it with a match.  "Yep, good 'nuf."  About a dozen of us finished six pints and lived.  It has no taste but burned like blue blazes.

During the festivities, one chap announced, "I married me a fat women to keep my balls off the floor."

No, I didn't go blind (well, not from the rot gut booze, anyway).

The national election results make a lot more sense now.


Yep, Bill Clinton was governer at the time.
 
2013-03-06 11:15:09 PM  
i'd rather live in Columbia
where distillation of coca spirits is totally rad
 
2013-03-06 11:21:32 PM  

Ocknard: It would require the same sort of change to the law to allow for home distilling.


In the meantime, is it time for a little civil disobedience? Gandhi made salt... someone should make ethanol.
 
2013-03-06 11:26:12 PM  
As a native Alabamian (of the masters-degree-educated, cultured, anti-organized-religion type) who has been brewing beer since 1994 in Alabama, I'm getting a kick.

What I find strange is that there were several home brewing retail shops in Alabama that were open for well over ten years prior to the Gov. Bently regime being elected last year.

/You're damn right I'm still brewing.
 
2013-03-06 11:59:32 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: i'd rather live in Columbia
where distillation of coca spirits is totally rad


Wut is this "Columbia" you speak of?
 
2013-03-07 01:55:39 AM  
Is there any list of the 50 states where Alabama doesn't show up on the shiatty end?  Is there one single good thing Alabama can brag about?
 
2013-03-07 02:03:14 AM  
During the debate on the issue, Mississippi Rep. Steve Holland sought to put the new measure in perspective, saying, "100 gallons! That's not much beer for a good drinker," according to a tweet from Raise Your Pints.

100g*128oz/365days=35.06oz/per day or 2.18pints, or as the average Farker calls it, breakfast
 
2013-03-07 02:08:43 AM  

Aquapope: Is there any list of the 50 states where Alabama doesn't show up on the shiatty end?  Is there one single good thing Alabama can brag about?


Alphabetically it comes out on top,
 
2013-03-07 02:11:47 AM  

tjsands1118: During the debate on the issue, Mississippi Rep. Steve Holland sought to put the new measure in perspective, saying, "100 gallons! That's not much beer for a good drinker," according to a tweet from Raise Your Pints.

100g*128oz/365days=35.06oz/per day or 2.18pints, or as the average Farker calls it, breakfast


Beer used to be a very common breakfast drink - it wasn't as toxic as the available water.  I imagine breakfast beer was a light lager.  Later, for lunch, you would have a porter.  I prefer a good IPA during a shower - the hoppiness really cuts through any suds that get in your mouth.
 
2013-03-07 02:14:14 AM  

tjsands1118: Aquapope: Is there any list of the 50 states where Alabama doesn't show up on the shiatty end?  Is there one single good thing Alabama can brag about?

Alphabetically it comes out on top,


Look who else comes up there: Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona... I'd call that the shiatty end.
 
2013-03-07 02:33:53 AM  

Aquapope: tjsands1118: During the debate on the issue, Mississippi Rep. Steve Holland sought to put the new measure in perspective, saying, "100 gallons! That's not much beer for a good drinker," according to a tweet from Raise Your Pints.

100g*128oz/365days=35.06oz/per day or 2.18pints, or as the average Farker calls it, breakfast

Beer used to be a very common breakfast drink - it wasn't as toxic as the available water.  I imagine breakfast beer was a light lager.  Later, for lunch, you would have a porter.  I prefer a good IPA during a shower - the hoppiness really cuts through any suds that get in your mouth.


Babies used to be weaned on beer.

Typically, a Victorian working class Briton would drink about 10 pints a day. About half of that would be small beer at 7% in the evening.

It wasn't just that beer was safe and water dangerous, it was the only way they could consume enough calories to fuel their work.
 
2013-03-07 02:34:32 AM  

Aquapope: Is there any list of the 50 states where Alabama doesn't show up on the shiatty end?  Is there one single good thing Alabama can brag about?


i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-07 02:35:50 AM  
Damn phone. Half small beer and half porter in the evening.
 
2013-03-07 03:09:27 AM  

SpiderQueenDemon: No abortions after 12 weeks and no home-brew?

Man, fark Alabama with a rusty spike.


Oh no, the 12-week abortion law nonsense is Arkansas, where I'm currently ashamed to be living. Urgh.... what a waste of money the state will have to spend paying back the complainant's attorneys for having those laws overturned.
 
2013-03-07 03:11:12 AM  

freetomato: Ocknard: freetomato: Georgia only legalized it once they got the nod to host the Olympics and realized that they couldn't open any brewpubs for the massive influx of visitors to enjoy.

/used to belong to the Covert Hops Society

The homebrew bill was in 1993. The brewpub law was passed a year or so later. But yes it was likely passed due to Olympics-related enthusiasm.

Georgia still has to get a law passed to legalize homebrew competitions. I don't think we'll get to-go sales from breweries passed this year.

/Still in Covert Hops, since 1993
//Was even president once

I used to really enjoy those meetings, and enjoyed stewarding one competition. I quit going when I divorced my ex. In fact I miss that more than him! I credit that era for expanding my taste beyond MGD and Bud. I haven't brewed in about ten years but still am a bit of a beer snob.

The only part of Alabama I know well is Montgomery. The Civil Rights Museum, the Hank Williams Museum and The Green Lantern restaurant are about the only places outside of Maxwell AFB are the only places I've ventured. Oh, and a Biscuits baseball game. Their mascot was a giant, googly eyed biscuit with a pat of butter for a tongue.


Holy hell, you've been to the Green Lantern? I grew up just a couple of miles away and never had the balls to go to that place.
 
2013-03-07 05:23:03 AM  

itsfullofstars: Wow, ending slavery and legalizing home brewing, it's been a big month for Mississippitucky.


Don't forget outlawing abortion.  That was a big one too.
 
2013-03-07 07:52:50 AM  

melopene: Holy hell, you've been to the Green Lantern? I grew up just a couple of miles away and never had the balls to go to that place.


A little old man I met at an antique mall recommended it to me as the place where locals go for a steak dinner.  For under $20, my husband and I got a beer and a ribeye dinner with baked potato, bread and salad.  Tasted like I'd taken it off the grill in my own backyard.  It looks dumpy but the dinner was great. I'm headed to Maxwell tomorrow and just might have to stop there.
 
2013-03-07 08:01:40 AM  

kannonball: As a native Alabamian (of the masters-degree-educated, cultured, anti-organized-religion type) who has been brewing beer since 1994 in Alabama, I'm getting a kick.

What I find strange is that there were several home brewing retail shops in Alabama that were open for well over ten years prior to the Gov. Bently regime being elected last year.

/You're damn right I'm still brewing.


I live in Alabama and I'm not sure I'm getting a kick out of this yet.

I honestly thought the law might have already been changed. This past Christmas I got my brother-in-law a home brewing kit from the local Sears store. They had stacks of them here. "Mr Beer" and a refill sounded like a good present to me.  Was supposed to be enough to make 6-8 gallons of beer. I should have gotten one for myself.  Surely Sears wasn't actively endorsing and assisting us in our illegal endeavor...were they?
 
2013-03-07 09:07:31 AM  
"If the governor signs the bill..."?  Are you farking kidding me!?!?!?!!?  How was there any debate or uncertainty about this at all?

/waiting on a liquid yeast packet to arrive in the mail for an oatmeal stout
//next up is a vanila bourbon stout
 
2013-03-07 09:24:54 AM  
I would like to salute subby for pointing out that most home-brewed beer sucks.
 
2013-03-07 09:36:08 AM  

uatuba: It's legal as far as the Feds are concerned, but it's not federally protected. However, even if it is illegal here, it is not enforced.


You should tell that to the Birmingham area store that just got raided by the ABC board for selling homebrew equipment and supplies.  It isn't an enforcement priority, but cases are made every year.

I suspect our prohibition's days are numbered.  There's a bill in the legislature right now that appears to be moving.  It could get caught up and die for lack of time because of the unrelated drama going on right now, but barring that there doesn't appear to be a lot of opposition.
 
2013-03-07 09:36:54 AM  

ragnaroknroll: I live in Alabama and I'm not sure I'm getting a kick out of this yet.

I honestly thought the law might have already been changed. This past Christmas I got my brother-in-law a home brewing kit from the local Sears store. They had stacks of them here. "Mr Beer" and a refill sounded like a good present to me. Was supposed to be enough to make 6-8 gallons of beer. I should have gotten one for myself. Surely Sears wasn't actively endorsing and assisting us in our illegal endeavor...were they?


Oh, you poor sweet thing. Mr. Beer? I got one of those for a Christmas present once. It is not exactly what you want to be doing as you go forward. Firstly, the equipment they give you is fairly crappy and a pain in the ass to upgrade. Seriously, the fermenter is something weird, like 2.2 gallons, which doesn't scale well to if you ever get into bigger batches with different ingredients. Secondly, their ingredients aren't that great. You get one tiny little can of liquid malt extract and then you're supposed to make the rest of it up with corn sugar. No hops, etc, (the LME is pre-hopped) which means you don't get a lot of variety in your beer. Third, once you get one of these things, you're going to want to keep using it, and then you're locked into their limited selection and variety of...everything, really.

Now, I still use the fermenter I got in the Mr. Beer kit because for a while I was a cheap bastard, so I used that and a couple of growlers for fermentation. But now that I'm no longer broke (thanks, Obama), I'm upgrading my beer stuff with a fermentation bucket and a few other goodies from Midwest Supplies. That's really the best place online I've found to get stuff, although shipping isn't cheap. Amazon doesn't have enough stuff that's Prime eligible to keep me from ordering from there, plus I've called them in the middle of a boil before and asked them questions and the dude on the other end of the phone gave me good answers right away.

As far as gear goes, you should probably look around for a good brewpot somewhere besides the internet - they're expensive and heavy, which makes them a real pain to order online. Everybody says stainless steel, but I've never had a problem with an enameled canning pot, just make sure it's a big one - 4 gallons is probably best. Get a fermenting bucket (they're relatively cheap and so much easier than half-assing it like I've done) and a bottlecapper/caps - just about everything else you can do without at least to start with. You will need some hose from the hardware store - get a whole crap ton, you'll use it to make an airlock as well as to siphon into beer bottles. Save your empties (poptop, not twisties), but make sure you rinse them out as soon as you're done drinking out of them - otherwise it's a real pain to get them clean later. You'll probably need a thermometer at some point, as well as a hydrometer, but for shoestring starting gear, they're not incredibly necessary - but they're not that expensive, either. Most of the rest of the stuff, like a plastic spoon for stirring, a funnel/strainer for filtering out hops, and a measuring cup, you should already have around the house.

So, tl;dr: Skip the Mr. Beer kit, order a minimum of equipment and some good ingredients, then see if you like it. If you start out with the absolute basics and end up with good-ish beer, you can easily scale up from the stuff I listed a lot easier than tossing out the "kit" crap that you won't use again. But hang onto that Mr. Beer fermenter, it's good for two-stage dry hopping off of a bigger batch or for use as a bottling bucket.
 
2013-03-07 09:39:41 AM  

Jarhead_h: "If the governor signs the bill..."?  Are you farking kidding me!?!?!?!!?  How was there any debate or uncertainty about this at all?

/waiting on a liquid yeast packet to arrive in the mail for an oatmeal stout
//next up is a vanila bourbon stout


You probably know this already but STERILIZE THE FARKIN' VANILLA BEAN!  I was making a vanilla brown once and suspended a vanilla bean on a thread during the secondary fermentation.  Tasted promisingly good the day I bottled it.  About a week later, I was awoken in the middle of the night by what sounded like a shotgun going off in my kitchen.  The bottles were exploding. I had beer on my ceiling.  Good times.  By process of elimination I figured that the only thing I'd not sterilized was the vanilla bean.  If I'd dunked it in boiling water briefly that might have prevented the beer-splosion.
 
2013-03-07 09:58:19 AM  

freetomato: Jarhead_h: "If the governor signs the bill..."?  Are you farking kidding me!?!?!?!!?  How was there any debate or uncertainty about this at all?

/waiting on a liquid yeast packet to arrive in the mail for an oatmeal stout
//next up is a vanila bourbon stout

You probably know this already but STERILIZE THE FARKIN' VANILLA BEAN!  I was making a vanilla brown once and suspended a vanilla bean on a thread during the secondary fermentation.  Tasted promisingly good the day I bottled it.  About a week later, I was awoken in the middle of the night by what sounded like a shotgun going off in my kitchen.  The bottles were exploding. I had beer on my ceiling.  Good times.  By process of elimination I figured that the only thing I'd not sterilized was the vanilla bean.  If I'd dunked it in boiling water briefly that might have prevented the beer-splosion.


I honestly hadn't thought about that actually, so THANK YOU.  Have no no need of beer-splosion.
 
2013-03-07 10:16:42 AM  

Aquapope: Is there any list of the 50 states where Alabama doesn't show up on the shiatty end?  Is there one single good thing Alabama can brag about?


Check out Huntsville sometime. We have the parts of NASA that used to actually do something.

But yes. Alabama is kinda crap. If I could find a comparable job somewhere near my and my wife's folks I would move ASAP.
 
2013-03-07 10:26:57 AM  

phyrkrakr: ragnaroknroll: I live in Alabama and I'm not sure I'm getting a kick out of this yet.

I honestly thought the law might have already been changed. This past Christmas I got my brother-in-law a home brewing kit from the local Sears store. They had stacks of them here. "Mr Beer" and a refill sounded like a good present to me. Was supposed to be enough to make 6-8 gallons of beer. I should have gotten one for myself. Surely Sears wasn't actively endorsing and assisting us in our illegal endeavor...were they?

Oh, you poor sweet thing. Mr. Beer? I got one of those for a Christmas present once. It is not exactly what you want to be doing as you go forward. Firstly, the equipment they give you is fairly crappy and a pain in the ass to upgrade. Seriously, the fermenter is something weird, like 2.2 gallons, which doesn't scale well to if you ever get into bigger batches with different ingredients. Secondly, their ingredients aren't that great. You get one tiny little can of liquid malt extract and then you're supposed to make the rest of it up with corn sugar. No hops, etc, (the LME is pre-hopped) which means you don't get a lot of variety in your beer. Third, once you get one of these things, you're going to want to keep using it, and then you're locked into their limited selection and variety of...everything, really.

Now, I still use the fermenter I got in the Mr. Beer kit because for a while I was a cheap bastard, so I used that and a couple of growlers for fermentation. But now that I'm no longer broke (thanks, Obama), I'm upgrading my beer stuff with a fermentation bucket and a few other goodies from Midwest Supplies. That's really the best place online I've found to get stuff, although shipping isn't cheap. Amazon doesn't have enough stuff that's Prime eligible to keep me from ordering from there, plus I've called them in the middle of a boil before and asked them questions and the dude on the other end of the phone gave me good answers right away.

As ...


Oh come off it. It seems like 90% of all new homebrewers start with Mr. Beer and it's fine to get you going. Everything is included, the batches are small enough that if you screw it up it's okay, and you can actually improve it a lot on your own by adding aroma hops at the end, DME instead of dextrose, or even doing a partial mash instead of a "booster". As long as you're aware that you could make substantially  better beer by upgrading when you see fit there's no problem.

I've been brewing for years and I do all-grain, but I'll never look down on a Mr. Beer starter kit as a gift for a new brewer. It's gotten more people involved in the hobby than anything else.
 
2013-03-07 10:34:11 AM  

MacEnvy: 've been brewing for years and I do all-grain, but I'll never look down on a Mr. Beer starter kit as a gift for a new brewer. It's gotten more people involved in the hobby than anything else.


It's the gateway drug for home brewing.

/Got one for x-mas
//Planning on getting a 5gal basic set with tax refund
///I got the bug.
 
2013-03-07 10:52:50 AM  

baka-san: MacEnvy: 've been brewing for years and I do all-grain, but I'll never look down on a Mr. Beer starter kit as a gift for a new brewer. It's gotten more people involved in the hobby than anything else.

It's the gateway drug for home brewing.

/Got one for x-mas
//Planning on getting a 5gal basic set with tax refund
///I got the bug.


My advice is to do at least 10 batches with extract+hopes+specialty grains before you even consider going to all-grain. You really want to get your process dialed in before doubling the length of your brew day and investing in spendy equipment, for what many would consider a marginal improvement unless your palate is really refined.

Also, many brewers still use primarily extract for decades. It makes competition-winning beer when you get the hang of it. Don't feel pressed to move to AG unless you really want to, despite what some snooty homebrewers say. Seriously, there's a huge snobbiness problem among a few vocal homebrewers who think everyone needs to hit the pinnacle of traditional methodology, and I find it distasteful. Do what you like, do what you can afford, and enjoy the cold, frosty fruits of your labor. Cheers.
 
2013-03-07 10:58:58 AM  

phyrkrakr: ragnaroknroll: I live in Alabama and I'm not sure I'm getting a kick out of this yet.

I honestly thought the law might have already been changed. This past Christmas I got my brother-in-law a home brewing kit from the local Sears store. They had stacks of them here. "Mr Beer" and a refill sounded like a good present to me. Was supposed to be enough to make 6-8 gallons of beer. I should have gotten one for myself. Surely Sears wasn't actively endorsing and assisting us in our illegal endeavor...were they?

Oh, you poor sweet thing. Mr. Beer? I got one of those for a Christmas present once. It is not exactly what you want to be doing as you go forward. Firstly, the equipment they give you is fairly crappy and a pain in the ass to upgrade. Seriously, the fermenter is something weird, like 2.2 gallons, which doesn't scale well to if you ever get into bigger batches with different ingredients. Secondly, their ingredients aren't that great. You get one tiny little can of liquid malt extract and then you're supposed to make the rest of it up with corn sugar. No hops, etc, (the LME is pre-hopped) which means you don't get a lot of variety in your beer. Third, once you get one of these things, you're going to want to keep using it, and then you're locked into their limited selection and variety of...everything, really.

Now, I still use the fermenter I got in the Mr. Beer kit because for a while I was a cheap bastard, so I used that and a couple of growlers for fermentation. But now that I'm no longer broke (thanks, Obama), I'm upgrading my beer stuff with a fermentation bucket and a few other goodies from Midwest Supplies. That's really the best place online I've found to get stuff, although shipping isn't cheap. Amazon doesn't have enough stuff that's Prime eligible to keep me from ordering from there, plus I've called them in the middle of a boil before and asked them questions and the dude on the other end of the phone gave me good answers right away.

As ...


I'll second for Midwest Supplies.  Great place for starters.  Oh, and here's a tip for newbies: OxyClean for your cleaning your bottles. Soak for a couple minutes. Run a bottle cleaner brush in them, rinse, then sanitize.  I haven't had a problem.

If you need to remove labels, let them soak for 20 minutes in a sink full of Oxyclean and hot water.  Most of the time, the labels will be floating (it does depend on who's label it is though).
 
2013-03-07 02:09:06 PM  

freetomato: melopene: Holy hell, you've been to the Green Lantern? I grew up just a couple of miles away and never had the balls to go to that place.

A little old man I met at an antique mall recommended it to me as the place where locals go for a steak dinner.  For under $20, my husband and I got a beer and a ribeye dinner with baked potato, bread and salad.  Tasted like I'd taken it off the grill in my own backyard.  It looks dumpy but the dinner was great. I'm headed to Maxwell tomorrow and just might have to stop there.


I think you and I are talking about two different Green Lanterns. The one I'm thinking of is beyond a dive bar, and borders on dangerous, and is off Old Tuscaloosa Highway in McCalla.
 
2013-03-07 02:37:31 PM  

melopene: freetomato: melopene: Holy hell, you've been to the Green Lantern? I grew up just a couple of miles away and never had the balls to go to that place.

A little old man I met at an antique mall recommended it to me as the place where locals go for a steak dinner.  For under $20, my husband and I got a beer and a ribeye dinner with baked potato, bread and salad.  Tasted like I'd taken it off the grill in my own backyard.  It looks dumpy but the dinner was great. I'm headed to Maxwell tomorrow and just might have to stop there.

I think you and I are talking about two different Green Lanterns. The one I'm thinking of is beyond a dive bar, and borders on dangerous, and is off Old Tuscaloosa Highway in McCalla.



Here is the one I am talking about:

http://dine.com/restaurants/Green-Lantern-Restaurant-Montgomery-Alab am a-148124.html

I think I remember someone saying it used to be  located outside the gate of Maxwell AFB, which is a  scary looking neighborhood and a lot of the reason why when I'm TDY there I rarely go off base.
 
2013-03-07 02:46:47 PM  

freetomato: melopene: freetomato: melopene: Holy hell, you've been to the Green Lantern? I grew up just a couple of miles away and never had the balls to go to that place.

A little old man I met at an antique mall recommended it to me as the place where locals go for a steak dinner.  For under $20, my husband and I got a beer and a ribeye dinner with baked potato, bread and salad.  Tasted like I'd taken it off the grill in my own backyard.  It looks dumpy but the dinner was great. I'm headed to Maxwell tomorrow and just might have to stop there.

I think you and I are talking about two different Green Lanterns. The one I'm thinking of is beyond a dive bar, and borders on dangerous, and is off Old Tuscaloosa Highway in McCalla.


Here is the one I am talking about:

http://dine.com/restaurants/Green-Lantern-Restaurant-Montgomery-Alab am a-148124.html

I think I remember someone saying it used to be  located outside the gate of Maxwell AFB, which is a  scary looking neighborhood and a lot of the reason why when I'm TDY there I rarely go off base.


Yeah... those are two VERY different places. I never spent much time in Montgomery, so it's no surprise that I didn't know about it.
 
2013-03-07 03:01:20 PM  

freetomato: I think I remember someone saying it used to be located outside the gate of Maxwell AFB, which is a scary looking neighborhood and a lot of the reason why when I'm TDY there I rarely go off base.


That neighborhood's appearance is indeed reflective of it's nature.  On the other hand, hit 31 north as you leave.  You'll soon find yourself in Prattville and your chances of surviving the evening with your health and wallet (if not life) will have increased dramatically.
 
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