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(The Register)   1986: The year of the Linux desktop   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 58
    More: Interesting, Linux Desktop, gnomes, linux, Chernobyl, Linux community, ThinkPad, programming tool, Novell  
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2754 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Mar 2013 at 10:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-06 09:33:53 PM

styckx: I love Linux and hate it.

Nothing worse than seeing a xorg or kernel update waiting for you and wondering if your video drivers will be farked upon reboot.


This reminds me of my experience using Gentoo.  I remember times in college when I'd do a world update, only to find that after I rebooted I had no desktop due to some library issue.  I still have it on a desktop, but my main laptop runs Ubuntu, which does the 'just works' thing for me just fine and is usually what I go to when I'm not looking to screw around.  Ubuntu has given me some issues with older hardware, but in my experience if everything is supported it usually runs pretty well.

OS X is nice, but I'm just not a fan of the desktop and I don't really need it for anything.

/Use what works for you
//Wish I didn't have to use Windows 7 at work
///It's not that bad, though
 
2013-03-06 10:23:45 PM

Samwise Gamgee: I'm a Linux newbie (first install was less than two months ago). I started with Ubuntu, hated the interface, put Gnome and KDE on there - better but too fiddly... gave Crunchbang a whirl because the light-weightedness appealed to me (and it's rock solid stable) but I found I was spending most of my time in the command line (which I was barely familiar with).

Finally wiped everything and installed Linux Mint (Cinnamon flavor) last week. It's brilliant! Everything is gorgeous and intuitive, and I don't think I've been forced to go to the command line once, even when I had to install a proprietary driver for my wireless card - I was able to install it from the software center. And the wireless was actually working before installing the proprietary driver; just timed out every now and then, so I never had to find an ethernet cable or anything to get it to work - just clicked a few buttons and bob's your uncle.

I set up VMWare and have installed the original Windows 7 copy that came with this laptop as a virtual machine - which works wonderfully - so I still have the ability to do everything I did in Windows if I have to (I haven't had to, but it's nice to know that I can still run Excel if I bump into a limitation with LibreOffice).

Before Mint I was considering giving up this whole Linux experiment, but instead of being frustrating, it's been quite pleasant. It's as easy to use as Windows XP was while actually being more polished in a lot of ways and infinitely more customizeable. This is what Ubuntu should have been, instead of that Unity abortion.

As a Linux newbie, I find that one of the coolest farking things about Linux is that virtually every distribution lets you run the OS off a USB stick and play around with it before installing. Zero worries about going through a whole installation process just to find out some of your hardware doesn't work. If it weren't for that I probably never would have had the balls to format my Windows HD and start tink ...


You've spent 2 months installing an OS on your computer.

Think about that.
 
2013-03-06 11:23:46 PM

fluffy2097: You've spent 2 months installing an OS on your computer.

Think about that.


It's not really like that... I've really installed only three different distributions (Ubuntu, Crunchbang, and Mint).

 That said, I've tried lots of different window managers: Unity, Gnome, KDE, KDE netbook edition, XFCE, Openbox, and Cinnamon. The first three I ran under Ubuntu, the second three under Crunchbang, and Cinnamon is what I'm running now in Mint (Mint comes in either MATE or Cinnamon flavors). But installing a window manager isn't like installing an OS... you pretty much install it just like any other program, you download it from an 'app store' (package manger) and run it. So when I say that I switched from Unity to KDE, it means I went to the package manger, hit 'install', waited four minutes or so for it to install, and then logged out and back in to the new KDE environment. It's not like I had to reinstall everything from scratch.

This also isn't all on one machine. The laptop I'm posting this from is the Mint machine (migrated from the Ubuntu/Gnome/KDE install). My netbook is running Crunchbang with the KDE netbook edition. I also installed Crunchbang on an old DVR I had lying around (!) just for kicks and it works surprisingly well - I'm going to hook it to my TV and use it as an HTPC.

I still have two Windows machines - a Toshiba laptop and a Cyberpower gaming beast. Yeah, I have a lot of hardware. I used to maintain 170+ machines for a company for three years. You accumulate a lot of stuff in a job like that.

So far Linux is interesting and neat. Things can get frustrating at times, but... it's farking free! I went from never having used Linux less than two months ago to now having three Linux machines - because it costs nothing to download and try out different distros and play around. Crunchbang, for instance, has breathed new life into the old XP netbook that I hadn't touched in months due to its slowness (Samsung NC10 from a few years back), and it's turned an old useless DVR into a real computer. It's sort of a thrill for a geek like me to have the freedom to play around all willy-nilly like this. With Windows I'd have to buy licenses for the software in order to install it on old hardware lying around. With OSX? Forget it, it just ain't happening - Apple doesn't give a shiat that you have hardware that you might want to run their OS on, they require you to buy theirs.
 
2013-03-07 04:38:50 AM
If you use Ubuntu, you can look at all sorts of crazy porn and not worry about viruses. So that's pretty much all I care about.
 
2013-03-07 06:53:44 AM

fluffy2097: You've spent 2 months installing an OS on your computer.

Think about that.


How long would it take a self-described newbie , who knew nothing about Windows, to get a new install up and running properly?

A few months ago, I did a side by side instal of Ubuntu and Win 7 on a partitioned drive on the same machine. Time to get the win7 up and fully updated and tweaked? Roughly 6 1/2 hours. The Ubuntu side? 4 1/2.
There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamed of in your philosophy.
 
2013-03-07 06:59:24 AM
Great, an Apple vs. Linux fanboiz article. This oughta get the page hits.

So the author was a dev for Gnome and Midnight Commander, eh? Sounds like he's been living in a cave for 20 years if he thinks there's still any reason to (re)compile the kernel, or that you have to spend hours hunting down apps and their dependencies. Hasn't he heard of software repositories? FFS!
 
2013-03-07 07:58:48 AM
Eh, I'm on Ubuntu 10.4 on this laptop because the Windows install ground to a halt due to the system's age.  Even a format & re-install didn't help too much.  This is a spare laptop I use during the workday when I don't want my 'net activities to be logged on my corporate VPN (don't tell Marissa Myers!!!).  For surfing, checking mail, chatting, and torrenting it does just fine.

My real biatch with Linux is that the newer kernels broke my onboard sound chip.  At least that's my conclusion - newer versions of Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS, etc all killed it, and the Googles were no help in fixing it.  I have a Win 7 desktop and Android table that I use for my real computing in the evenings.  I'm not close enough to Apple's tax bracket to buy a Macbook.
 
2013-03-08 04:03:39 PM

dentalhilljack: My real biatch with Linux is that the newer kernels broke my onboard sound chip. At least that's my conclusion - newer versions of Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS, etc all killed it, and the Googles were no help in fixing it. I have a Win 7 desktop and Android table that I use for my real computing in the evenings. I'm not close enough to Apple's tax bracket to buy a Macbook.


It's not broken. You just haven't gotten it working yet. Dig into that source code, buddy I'm sure there will be a comment somewhere that will help!
 
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