If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Register)   1986: The year of the Linux desktop   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 58
    More: Interesting, Linux Desktop, gnomes, linux, Chernobyl, Linux community, ThinkPad, programming tool, Novell  
•       •       •

2754 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Mar 2013 at 10:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



58 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-03-06 10:18:56 AM  
Paging Linux_Yes. Paging Linux_Yes.
 
2013-03-06 10:19:29 AM  
This is my take as well.  In the last year that I've been learning iOS programming and dorking around on a Mac, I've realised that OSX is the Unix everyone wished they had in the past.

It works.  The ui works and isn't half-assed.  The tools don't suck.

I know linux got a lot of popularity in the last 20 years but folks need to remember that UNIX was commercial software to start and OSX really seems to be the best-of-breed if you're talking about a desktop OS.
 
2013-03-06 10:20:27 AM  
My second partition is Linux Mint and I really can't dispute the assertions made. Having Steam in Linux has helped me boot to that partition more often, but to get that working there was a short gauntlet of having to install actual Nvidia drivers. For some reason I couldn't do that with the .deb binary on their website, but instead had to use some esoteric commands as root to add a repository and then update/upgrade.

Linux shines is embedded solutions. Android is absolutely prolific these days and it's likely Valve will be using a variant of linux for their Steambox. But those take the background work away from the user and mitigate most of the problems they will have.
 
2013-03-06 10:25:42 AM  
Linux as a server is a truly wonderful and unparalleled thing.

Linux as a workstation is still, after all these years, an inconceivably terrible thing.
 
2013-03-06 10:27:00 AM  

MightyPez: Linux shines is in embedded solutions.


Hurrr....
 
2013-03-06 10:32:26 AM  

FTA


Computing-wise that three week vacation turned out to be very relaxing. Machine would suspend and resume without problem, WiFi just worked, audio did not stop working, I spend three weeks without having to recompile the kernel to adjust this or that, nor fighting the video drivers, or deal with the bizarre and random speed degradation that my ThinkPad suffered.
While I missed the comprehensive Linux toolchain and userland, I did not miss having to chase the proper package for my current version of Linux, or beg someone to package something. Binaries just worked.
 I am not a Mac fan, but he is spot-on.
 
2013-03-06 10:34:52 AM  
If computers and their use were a transportation system. Windows and iOS would be cars and buses and Linux would be roads and bridges.
 
2013-03-06 10:39:48 AM  
Linux is a great desktop OS unless you want to actually use your computer.
 
2013-03-06 10:45:29 AM  
I was thinking about getting a macbook air and then I saw this

static.musiciansfriend.com

It comes out to about $1300, and is probably more fun than my Win7 laptop.
 
2013-03-06 10:49:07 AM  

Slam Dunkz: This is my take as well.  In the last year that I've been learning iOS programming and dorking around on a Mac, I've realised that OSX is the Unix everyone wished they had in the past.


Developing on OSX makes me physically ill. You get the frustration of developing on Linux without the nice IDEs you get developing on Windows.

Not to mention that Apple is pretty clearly getting out of the prosumer laptop environment. I do all my development on a MBP, but none of it on OSX.
 
2013-03-06 10:49:59 AM  
Love my MacBook Pro.
 
2013-03-06 10:52:17 AM  

enik: Linux as a server is a truly wonderful and unparalleled thing.

Linux as a workstation is still, after all these years, an inconceivably terrible thing.


zipdog: Linux is a great desktop OS unless you want to actually use your computer.


Meh. Works fine for me, for what I use it for - as does Windows. I've never been able to find one OS that does everything the way I want it - and these days, with large, easily partitioned HDDs and VMs, you can have as many as you want. I can't really get excited about the OS "A" is better than OS "B" debate - it's meaningless to me.
 
2013-03-06 10:54:04 AM  
Linux is great as a server - not so great as a day-to-day desktop environment. I pretty much only use my Ubuntu install to run Netbeans...and Windows 7 and Mac OSX in Virtualbox clients.
 
2013-03-06 10:59:18 AM  
I've been forced to use a Mac the last few months at work.. Better as a desktop than Linux in general, but man do I hate finder. I keep wondering why such a stable os uses that crash happy pos.
 
2013-03-06 11:01:51 AM  
The one issue with My Linux Mint is that I needed to look up how to get my wireless card working.  Other than that, it works just fine for my needs.  I wouldn't mind a Mac, but at the current time, I probably can't afford one.  I still have a Windows partition in the event I actually need Windows.
 
2013-03-06 11:01:59 AM  

SpankyPinkbottom: Linux is great as a server - not so great as a day-to-day desktop environment. I pretty much only use my Ubuntu install to run Netbeans...and Windows 7 and Mac OSX in Virtualbox clients.


I've never been able to make an OSX guest machine with Virtualbox - with my limited knowledge of the app, I have only been able to find options for Linux, Windows, and Mac Server options for guest machines on Virtualbox. Any info you have would be appreciated.
 
2013-03-06 11:07:52 AM  
Xubuntu has always worked well for me as a desktop. The system was able to correctly detect and install my video card drivers. I don't play video games though, so I have no clue how well it holds up against Windows if you are into that. My big complaint with the Linux desktops is that Netflix won't run on them natively. This is entirely a construct of Microsoft though. Microsoft won't release Silverlight's DRM for Linux, so no port is available. I don't understand why Netflix doesn't just use Flash like very other site. I can't wait for HTML5 to take over.

I'm not really picky what desktop OS I use though. I have an iMac with OS x 10.8, and my laptop dual boots to Xubuntu and Windows 7 (I have to use windows for work as some applications I must use are windows only).

Of course, I have a millions VMs of various operating systems to mess around with.

If we are talking about servers, there is no question that Linux/Unix are the go to operating systems. Windows Server is only useful for active directory IMO.
 
2013-03-06 11:24:03 AM  

count chocula: Microsoft won't release Silverlight's DRM for Linux, so no port is available.


ugh. Just port it yourself. That's why linux exists. To do everything the hardest way humanly possible.

The very joy of Linux is coding your own silverlight emulator.

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-03-06 11:41:18 AM  

jso2897: SpankyPinkbottom: Linux is great as a server - not so great as a day-to-day desktop environment. I pretty much only use my Ubuntu install to run Netbeans...and Windows 7 and Mac OSX in Virtualbox clients.

I've never been able to make an OSX guest machine with Virtualbox - with my limited knowledge of the app, I have only been able to find options for Linux, Windows, and Mac Server options for guest machines on Virtualbox. Any info you have would be appreciated.


That is by design. OS X will only run on Mac hardware (this is an arbitrary limitation put in place by apple). If you actually read the license for virtualbox/vmware this is mentioned.

There are cracks/patches to get round this, but there is no official support. You also must be running an Intel Core processor for it to work.
 
2013-03-06 11:44:34 AM  

fluffy2097: count chocula: Microsoft won't release Silverlight's DRM for Linux, so no port is available.

ugh. Just port it yourself. That's why linux exists. To do everything the hardest way humanly possible.

The very joy of Linux is coding your own silverlight emulator.

[imgs.xkcd.com image 740x232]


There is a silverlight implementation for linux, it's called moonlight.

from the moonlight FAQ:

Does Netflix work with moonlight?

Netflix does not work with Moonlight at this time. While Moonlight supports all of the UI and media playback infrastructure, it lacks DRM support which Netflix requires. See this silverlight.net forum
 
2013-03-06 11:46:10 AM  

count chocula: Netflix does not work with Moonlight at this time. While Moonlight supports all of the UI and media playback infrastructure, it lacks DRM support which Netflix requires. See this silverlight.net forum


Sounds like lazy linux devs aren't supporting that DRM.

I'm sure they can make it work. They crack everything else for fun.
 
2013-03-06 11:55:17 AM  

Fubini: Slam Dunkz: This is my take as well.  In the last year that I've been learning iOS programming and dorking around on a Mac, I've realised that OSX is the Unix everyone wished they had in the past.

Developing on OSX makes me physically ill. You get the frustration of developing on Linux without the nice IDEs you get developing on Windows.

Not to mention that Apple is pretty clearly getting out of the prosumer laptop environment. I do all my development on a MBP, but none of it on OSX.


Well yeah comparing just about any development IDE to the windows ones is hard to do as they are the best for the most part.  I was talking about UNIX development.  Even then, some of the apple tools are actually much better than even the windows ones.  In particular the UI designer, and the instrumentation tools are pretty freaking snazzy.  CoreData is also awesome for desktop data storage.
 
2013-03-06 12:27:43 PM  

Slam Dunkz: Fubini: Slam Dunkz: This is my take as well.  In the last year that I've been learning iOS programming and dorking around on a Mac, I've realised that OSX is the Unix everyone wished they had in the past.

Developing on OSX makes me physically ill. You get the frustration of developing on Linux without the nice IDEs you get developing on Windows.

Not to mention that Apple is pretty clearly getting out of the prosumer laptop environment. I do all my development on a MBP, but none of it on OSX.

Well yeah comparing just about any development IDE to the windows ones is hard to do as they are the best for the most part.  I was talking about UNIX development.  Even then, some of the apple tools are actually much better than even the windows ones.  In particular the UI designer, and the instrumentation tools are pretty freaking snazzy.  CoreData is also awesome for desktop data storage.


I would very much object to the characterization of Windows as the best development environment. I'm not going to say Linux is better, but they both definitely have their uses.
 
2013-03-06 12:44:03 PM  
One of my media servers at home is on Ubuntu, the other is Windows. The best quote that describes my experience with the two of them: Linux is only free is your time has no value.

I enjoy being able to play around with operating systems, but pretty much every Ubuntu upgrade breaks something. Sound, video, mouse, keyboard, remote. Something will no longer work correctly after an upgrade. It's become not worth it. I'll probably throw a copy of Windows on there next time I have to upgrade the thing.
 
2013-03-06 12:44:52 PM  

miscreant: Linux is only free if your time has no value


ftfm
 
2013-03-06 01:32:54 PM  
I get where he's coming from: the Linux ecosystem is incredibly fragmented. It's relatively easy for a developer to design a game that takes advantage of Windows' DirectX for graphics acceleration (or something similar for a Mac) as there's a reasonable assurance that things will behave similarly across all Windows systems. That's not necessarily the case for Linux, where different distributions can do things in significantly different ways. Hell, even different graphical desktop environments like Gnome, KDE, Xfce, etc. handle things in different ways. This flexibility can be a huge advantage but it's also a disadvantage as it fragments the ecosystem and makes it difficult to develop a lot of software if developers can't have a known target system.

Ubuntu seemed to be the "next, best hope" for a solid desktop Linux but then they went full retard with Unity and a bunch of other stupid changes. Fedora's a bit too unstable for a lot of users and Gnome 3 is pretty hideous. Linux Mint, on the other hand, seems to be doing a damn good job at ironing out a lot of the kinks by building on Ubuntu and Debian. I've found very little that is lacking for the "everyday" user: many Windows users I know do most of their work online, which makes things a bit easier -- installing Chrome gets them a fast browser with up-to-date Flash, many of the people I know already use OpenOffice/LibreOffice on their Windows systems so there's no change, and things are generally where they expect them to be without needing to massively re-learn everything ala Windows 8's Metro or Ubuntu's Unity interfaces.

Are there areas that Mint could improve further? Sure. Is it ready to be a complete replacement for Windows in all regards? No. Still, they're moving in the right direction and that's nice to see.

/uses pretty standard hardware so I haven't ever had issues relating to wireless, sound, etc. Things have always "just worked" for years.
//never had to deal with any kernel-level issues
///your mileage may vary
 
2013-03-06 01:42:21 PM  
I still love Linux for work. We've been using Red Hat with a KDE interface for ages. It's great and I prefer it to working on Windows. For fun though I prefer anything else.
 
2013-03-06 02:00:29 PM  

heypete: Ubuntu seemed to be the "next, best hope" for a solid desktop Linux but then they went full retard with Unity and a bunch of other stupid changes. Fedora's a bit too unstable for a lot of users and Gnome 3 is pretty hideous. Linux Mint, on the other hand, seems to be doing a damn good job at ironing out a lot of the kinks by building on Ubuntu and Debian.


I had Ubuntu 10. Switched to Mint. Switched back to Ubuntu 12. For what I do, it's fine.
 
2013-03-06 02:15:39 PM  

Keyser_Soze_Death: FTA


Computing-wise that three week vacation turned out to be very relaxing. Machine would suspend and resume without problem, WiFi just worked, audio did not stop working, I spend three weeks without having to recompile the kernel to adjust this or that, nor fighting the video drivers, or deal with the bizarre and random speed degradation that my ThinkPad suffered.
While I missed the comprehensive Linux toolchain and userland, I did not miss having to chase the proper package for my current version of Linux, or beg someone to package something. Binaries just worked.
 I am not a Mac fan, but he is spot-on.


A Windows laptop would have worked just as well.

/Has W8
//With Classic Shell
 
2013-03-06 02:15:52 PM  
I love Linux and hate it.

Nothing worse than seeing a xorg or kernel update waiting for you and wondering if your video drivers will be farked upon reboot.
 
2013-03-06 02:29:51 PM  
MightyPez: My second partition is Linux Mint and I really can't dispute the assertions made. Having Steam in Linux has helped me boot to that partition more often, but to get that working there was a short gauntlet of having to install actual Nvidia drivers. For some reason I couldn't do that with the .deb binary on their website, but instead had to use some esoteric commands as root to add a repository and then update/upgrade.

People tend to give out the esoteric commands because it's easier to give you the commands and have you copy/paste them into a console, vs actually directing you what to do in the UI.

There's a UI for managing software sources.

daliman.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-06 02:36:00 PM  
jso2897: I've never been able to make an OSX guest machine with Virtualbox

You can do it, via patches to the OSX ISO, it's sort of a PITA and you can't upgrade it (it will break), and you can only do it if you have some specific hardware (for example, certain CPUs). And the method I used to install it a year ago is certain to be outdated now.

Remember, Apple doesn't want you running OSX on non apple hardware and they intentionally make things difficult.

OSX in Virtualbox
lordargent.com

OSX Updating
lordargent.com

Update completed, but on reboot.
lordargent.com
 
2013-03-06 02:42:58 PM  

lordargent: MightyPez: My second partition is Linux Mint and I really can't dispute the assertions made. Having Steam in Linux has helped me boot to that partition more often, but to get that working there was a short gauntlet of having to install actual Nvidia drivers. For some reason I couldn't do that with the .deb binary on their website, but instead had to use some esoteric commands as root to add a repository and then update/upgrade.

People tend to give out the esoteric commands because it's easier to give you the commands and have you copy/paste them into a console, vs actually directing you what to do in the UI.

There's a UI for managing software sources.

[daliman.files.wordpress.com image 541x498]


I'm well aware of Synaptic and other package managers/sources. The problem was even needing to mess with them when the binary from the manufacturer  should have worked.
 
2013-03-06 02:48:13 PM  
In all honesty, it's easier to set up a K/Ubuntu Linux desktop from scratch than it is to install a Windows 7 desktop. At least for my hardware, I've been finding that Ubuntu actually has better driver support out of the box than Windows.
 
2013-03-06 02:50:00 PM  
MightyPez: I'm well aware of Synaptic and other package managers/sources. The problem was even needing to mess with them when the binary from the manufacturer should have worked.

Ahh, that's kinda screwed up then, isn't the PPA essentially giving you the binary as well, precompiled for your architecture.

lordargent.com

// to be fair, they write crappy windows drivers as well :D
 
2013-03-06 03:31:00 PM  
On occasion I "need" linux I have a vm or Xubuntu I restore in 5 seconds.
Used to develop in Ubuntu...

Once was a windows fan, now I'm in OSX
 
2013-03-06 03:50:04 PM  
"I believed strongly in dogfooding our own products,"

Does he work for the Department of Redundancy Dept?
 
2013-03-06 03:52:27 PM  

Shadyman: In all honesty, it's easier to set up a K/Ubuntu Linux desktop from scratch than it is to install a Windows 7 desktop. At least for my hardware, I've been finding that Ubuntu actually has better driver support out of the box than Windows.


This has been my experience. That's why I switched...was having issues with an onboard NIC on my asus mobo that Windows didn't want to recognize.

Ubuntu picked it right up. It's not perfect, and there's a lot more manual labor involved, but the good thing about the linux community is that for the most part they see the benefit of supporting wider adoption by helping semi-noobs like me out. I've worked on SGI and Solaris unix systems back in the nineties so I understand a lot of the unix concepts...but there are some curveballs in linux.
 
2013-03-06 04:16:03 PM  
Having an issue with OS X?  It doesn't work like that, get over it.
Having an issue with Windows?  Other people said the same thing... does this help? [Y/n]
Having an issue with Linux?  Paste this command to terminal and try again.  Good luck!
 
DB
2013-03-06 04:44:46 PM  
I can pay a grand for an entry level Mac or half that for a decent pc and install Ubuntu for free. OSX may be the superior OS but until Apple stops price gouging, making proprietary devices and hardware and generally forcing you to use soley their products and services then my money goes elsewhere. Apple used to be niche driven and now they are market driven and I respond accordingly.
 
2013-03-06 04:59:56 PM  
In my experience pretty much everything TFA has said about mac can be said about ubuntu.
Perhaps I've just gotten lucky but for me it's always just farking worked.
When you buy hardware make sure it's supported in advance- just like you would for any other OS.
Done.
Wine and virtualbox can be a pain but that's wine and virtualbox, not ubuntu.
 
2013-03-06 05:00:28 PM  
As a Linux software developer, let me let you in a dirty little secret: the majority of us developers here in the office have a MacBook and iPhone on our desk.

After dealing with Linux all day, you really don't want to spend your evenings and weekends farking around. You want something that works, and works now.
 
2013-03-06 05:11:55 PM  
For business desktops the only real reason to keep windows around would be serious specialty business software like Wonderware. Or in my case, gaming. I have indeed been assed to break out wine and play a few games on it but wine is not exactly as fun or straight forward as a fresh windows install and installing all your games on it. Much more LAN party friendly. There's also guys like blizzard banning Diablo 3 players for using wine because (I think) zomg hax. M$ Office doesn't count anymore with the sophistication of LibreOffice, >99% of business that still habitually use/buy it are scared of the change they can leave in their pocket. Don't even get me started on exchange & outlook.

I suppose you have the occasional windows admin who faps to active directory, but really, a more experienced *nix admin can do a perfectly fine job using open source software. Also having AD being the ONLY reason you aren't running a *nix server is just silly.

/*BSD servers > *nix > windows > (lol) apple
//Proof:
www.wired.com
 
2013-03-06 06:33:19 PM  
As a long time Linux user, I'm kind of surprised by the Linux desktop hate.  I switched from a Windows desktop years ago, and haven't missed anything.  I still keep a VM around to run the occasional Windows-only utility (LogMeIn Rescue, various router recovery software).  I haven't had to recompile a kernel in several years.  The only gripe I have is lack of multi graphic card compositing.  Everything else works flawlessly.
 
2013-03-06 06:35:40 PM  
Another Software Developer/Sysadmin moving to OSX?

color me shocked.

/Sysadmin
//Mac User
///Microsoft-free for 6 years and counting
 
2013-03-06 07:40:21 PM  
heypete:
Ubuntu seemed to be the "next, best hope" for a solid desktop Linux but then they went full retard with Unity and a bunch of other stupid changes. Fedora's a bit too unstable for a lot of users and Gnome 3 is pretty hideous. Linux Mint, on the other hand, seems to be doing a damn good job at ironing out a lot of the kinks by building on Ubuntu and Debian.

 I'm a Linux newbie (first install was less than two months ago). I started with Ubuntu, hated the interface, put Gnome and KDE on there - better but too fiddly... gave Crunchbang a whirl because the light-weightedness appealed to me (and it's rock solid stable) but I found I was spending most of my time in the command line (which I was barely familiar with).

 Finally wiped everything and installed Linux Mint (Cinnamon flavor) last week. It's brilliant! Everything is gorgeous and intuitive, and I don't think I've been forced to go to the command line once, even when I had to install a proprietary driver for my wireless card - I was able to install it from the software center. And the wireless was actually working before installing the proprietary driver; just timed out every now and then, so I never had to find an ethernet cable or anything to get it to work - just clicked a few buttons and bob's your uncle.

 I set up VMWare and have installed the original Windows 7 copy that came with this laptop as a virtual machine - which works wonderfully - so I still have the ability to do everything I did in Windows if I have to (I haven't had to, but it's nice to know that I can still run Excel if I bump into a limitation with LibreOffice).

 Before Mint I was considering giving up this whole Linux experiment, but instead of being frustrating, it's been quite pleasant. It's as easy to use as Windows XP was while actually being more polished in a lot of ways and infinitely more customizeable. This is what Ubuntu should have been, instead of that Unity abortion.

 As a Linux newbie, I find that one of the coolest farking things about Linux is that virtually every distribution lets you run the OS off a USB stick and play around with it before installing. Zero worries about going through a whole installation process just to find out some of your hardware doesn't work. If it weren't for that I probably never would have had the balls to format my Windows HD and start tinkering.
 
2013-03-06 07:51:58 PM  
Samwise Gamgee: I'm a Linux newbie (first install was less than two months ago). I started with Ubuntu, hated the interface

You installed Unity didn't you?

// 10.04 life
 
2013-03-06 08:28:41 PM  

lordargent: Samwise Gamgee: I'm a Linux newbie (first install was less than two months ago). I started with Ubuntu, hated the interface

You installed Unity didn't you?

// 10.04 life


Forgive me, I didn't know any better. I had KDE installed within an hour (and this is someone who didn't know what KDE really was before all this happened). Part of that hour was spent googling stuff like 'how to change ubuntu interface' because I hated it so. You know you have a shiatty interface when a complete Linux newbie manages - out of desperation - to install a different window manager in the first 60 minutes!

Very happy with Cinnamon Mint though, and I think I'll be sticking here for the time being.

BTW, I flashed my old Galaxy Nexus with the Ubuntu Phone dev preview... it's even shiattier than desktop unity. Absolutely horrid. It wants to plaster every screen with facebook and twitter and 'hot new apps and music' and other garbage. Noisome and cluttered. Interested in Sailfish OS now...
 
2013-03-06 08:33:54 PM  

fang06554: As a long time Linux user, I'm kind of surprised by the Linux desktop hate.  I switched from a Windows desktop years ago, and haven't missed anything.  I still keep a VM around to run the occasional Windows-only utility (LogMeIn Rescue, various router recovery software).  I haven't had to recompile a kernel in several years.  The only gripe I have is lack of multi graphic card compositing.  Everything else works flawlessly.


My experience, as well. I don't VM, I dual boot because I use windows for gaming, and I've never been happy with Virtualbox's hardware support. I will never switch to Linux, but neither would I give it up.
But, you know - haterz gonna hate.
i18.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-06 09:18:15 PM  
MightyPez: I'm well aware of Synaptic and other package managers/sources. The problem was even needing to mess with them when the binary from the manufacturer should have worked.

I just got home and checked and realized that I'm not even using the PPA anymore. It just showed up in the proprietary drivers list.

I do recall grabbing it from the PPA once before, I think what happened is that the PPA version sucked for some reason or another so I went back to the default that Jockey (Hardware Drivers) showed.
 
2013-03-06 09:33:53 PM  

styckx: I love Linux and hate it.

Nothing worse than seeing a xorg or kernel update waiting for you and wondering if your video drivers will be farked upon reboot.


This reminds me of my experience using Gentoo.  I remember times in college when I'd do a world update, only to find that after I rebooted I had no desktop due to some library issue.  I still have it on a desktop, but my main laptop runs Ubuntu, which does the 'just works' thing for me just fine and is usually what I go to when I'm not looking to screw around.  Ubuntu has given me some issues with older hardware, but in my experience if everything is supported it usually runs pretty well.

OS X is nice, but I'm just not a fan of the desktop and I don't really need it for anything.

/Use what works for you
//Wish I didn't have to use Windows 7 at work
///It's not that bad, though
 
2013-03-06 10:23:45 PM  

Samwise Gamgee: I'm a Linux newbie (first install was less than two months ago). I started with Ubuntu, hated the interface, put Gnome and KDE on there - better but too fiddly... gave Crunchbang a whirl because the light-weightedness appealed to me (and it's rock solid stable) but I found I was spending most of my time in the command line (which I was barely familiar with).

Finally wiped everything and installed Linux Mint (Cinnamon flavor) last week. It's brilliant! Everything is gorgeous and intuitive, and I don't think I've been forced to go to the command line once, even when I had to install a proprietary driver for my wireless card - I was able to install it from the software center. And the wireless was actually working before installing the proprietary driver; just timed out every now and then, so I never had to find an ethernet cable or anything to get it to work - just clicked a few buttons and bob's your uncle.

I set up VMWare and have installed the original Windows 7 copy that came with this laptop as a virtual machine - which works wonderfully - so I still have the ability to do everything I did in Windows if I have to (I haven't had to, but it's nice to know that I can still run Excel if I bump into a limitation with LibreOffice).

Before Mint I was considering giving up this whole Linux experiment, but instead of being frustrating, it's been quite pleasant. It's as easy to use as Windows XP was while actually being more polished in a lot of ways and infinitely more customizeable. This is what Ubuntu should have been, instead of that Unity abortion.

As a Linux newbie, I find that one of the coolest farking things about Linux is that virtually every distribution lets you run the OS off a USB stick and play around with it before installing. Zero worries about going through a whole installation process just to find out some of your hardware doesn't work. If it weren't for that I probably never would have had the balls to format my Windows HD and start tink ...


You've spent 2 months installing an OS on your computer.

Think about that.
 
2013-03-06 11:23:46 PM  

fluffy2097: You've spent 2 months installing an OS on your computer.

Think about that.


It's not really like that... I've really installed only three different distributions (Ubuntu, Crunchbang, and Mint).

 That said, I've tried lots of different window managers: Unity, Gnome, KDE, KDE netbook edition, XFCE, Openbox, and Cinnamon. The first three I ran under Ubuntu, the second three under Crunchbang, and Cinnamon is what I'm running now in Mint (Mint comes in either MATE or Cinnamon flavors). But installing a window manager isn't like installing an OS... you pretty much install it just like any other program, you download it from an 'app store' (package manger) and run it. So when I say that I switched from Unity to KDE, it means I went to the package manger, hit 'install', waited four minutes or so for it to install, and then logged out and back in to the new KDE environment. It's not like I had to reinstall everything from scratch.

This also isn't all on one machine. The laptop I'm posting this from is the Mint machine (migrated from the Ubuntu/Gnome/KDE install). My netbook is running Crunchbang with the KDE netbook edition. I also installed Crunchbang on an old DVR I had lying around (!) just for kicks and it works surprisingly well - I'm going to hook it to my TV and use it as an HTPC.

I still have two Windows machines - a Toshiba laptop and a Cyberpower gaming beast. Yeah, I have a lot of hardware. I used to maintain 170+ machines for a company for three years. You accumulate a lot of stuff in a job like that.

So far Linux is interesting and neat. Things can get frustrating at times, but... it's farking free! I went from never having used Linux less than two months ago to now having three Linux machines - because it costs nothing to download and try out different distros and play around. Crunchbang, for instance, has breathed new life into the old XP netbook that I hadn't touched in months due to its slowness (Samsung NC10 from a few years back), and it's turned an old useless DVR into a real computer. It's sort of a thrill for a geek like me to have the freedom to play around all willy-nilly like this. With Windows I'd have to buy licenses for the software in order to install it on old hardware lying around. With OSX? Forget it, it just ain't happening - Apple doesn't give a shiat that you have hardware that you might want to run their OS on, they require you to buy theirs.
 
2013-03-07 04:38:50 AM  
If you use Ubuntu, you can look at all sorts of crazy porn and not worry about viruses. So that's pretty much all I care about.
 
2013-03-07 06:53:44 AM  

fluffy2097: You've spent 2 months installing an OS on your computer.

Think about that.


How long would it take a self-described newbie , who knew nothing about Windows, to get a new install up and running properly?

A few months ago, I did a side by side instal of Ubuntu and Win 7 on a partitioned drive on the same machine. Time to get the win7 up and fully updated and tweaked? Roughly 6 1/2 hours. The Ubuntu side? 4 1/2.
There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamed of in your philosophy.
 
2013-03-07 06:59:24 AM  
Great, an Apple vs. Linux fanboiz article. This oughta get the page hits.

So the author was a dev for Gnome and Midnight Commander, eh? Sounds like he's been living in a cave for 20 years if he thinks there's still any reason to (re)compile the kernel, or that you have to spend hours hunting down apps and their dependencies. Hasn't he heard of software repositories? FFS!
 
2013-03-07 07:58:48 AM  
Eh, I'm on Ubuntu 10.4 on this laptop because the Windows install ground to a halt due to the system's age.  Even a format & re-install didn't help too much.  This is a spare laptop I use during the workday when I don't want my 'net activities to be logged on my corporate VPN (don't tell Marissa Myers!!!).  For surfing, checking mail, chatting, and torrenting it does just fine.

My real biatch with Linux is that the newer kernels broke my onboard sound chip.  At least that's my conclusion - newer versions of Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS, etc all killed it, and the Googles were no help in fixing it.  I have a Win 7 desktop and Android table that I use for my real computing in the evenings.  I'm not close enough to Apple's tax bracket to buy a Macbook.
 
2013-03-08 04:03:39 PM  

dentalhilljack: My real biatch with Linux is that the newer kernels broke my onboard sound chip. At least that's my conclusion - newer versions of Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS, etc all killed it, and the Googles were no help in fixing it. I have a Win 7 desktop and Android table that I use for my real computing in the evenings. I'm not close enough to Apple's tax bracket to buy a Macbook.


It's not broken. You just haven't gotten it working yet. Dig into that source code, buddy I'm sure there will be a comment somewhere that will help!
 
Displayed 58 of 58 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report