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(NPR)   Put away the champagne, hide the blow, pay the hookers to leave. The DOW isn't at an all-time high when you adjust for inflation. Thank NPR for ruining our fun   (npr.org) divider line 111
    More: Followup, Dow Jones Industrial Average, Arithmetic precision, cost sharing, inflation  
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5438 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Mar 2013 at 9:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-06 10:17:10 AM

untaken_name: AgentBang: I'm glad NPR made this point. I'm tired of hearing crowing about how things are better, people are better, everything is better when in reality people are still being paid like crap but corporations are still making record profits.

Not to mention that a smaller and smaller portion of the population controls a larger and larger percentage of the wealth. That is not the way to a prosperous society.


I'm curious why no one has made the connection that worker unrest and unionization corrolates to companies doing everything in their power to force workers to work harder and more for less pay. If you made working conditions better, with a fair wage and livable conditions, you wouldn't have a need for unionization of the work force

/I feel like I'm the only one who understands this concept
 
2013-03-06 10:17:59 AM

sewnandsilent: ModernLuddite: I put all my money in

POW  the Dao Tao.

Damn it.

ftfy


Batman stocks are up!
 
2013-03-06 10:19:16 AM

somedude210: Half Right: somedude210: sewnandsilent: ModernLuddite: I put all my money in the Dao Tao.

Damn it.

ftfy

both are acceptable spellings. Dao is old Chinese?

Spelling it "Tao" is still used because it's so universally recognized. It got grandfathered in.
It has always been pronounced "Dao" however, and "Dao" is the modern spelling.

ah, thought it was the reverse and Dao was old-school, Tao was the new hotness


I though that either was acceptable because it's transliterated, and the actual sound in Chinese is somewhere between a "d" and a "t" that has no exact equivalent sound in English, like the way the folks at the local Chinese restaurant pronounce "Tsingtao" beer. Sure, there are "standardized" ways to represent transliterations, but it's kind of a stretch to say that one or other is "correct".

ObTrivia: In The Seven Pillars, T.E. Lawrence shows his disdain for the various schemes for transliterating Arabic by deliberately spelling Arabic proper names in a variety of different ways. His editor was not amused.
 
2013-03-06 10:19:56 AM
images.fineartamerica.com

I wonder when we'll figure it out.
/Not really, they never will.
//They'll try to retire the dime soon.
 
2013-03-06 10:22:16 AM

somedude210: untaken_name: AgentBang: I'm glad NPR made this point. I'm tired of hearing crowing about how things are better, people are better, everything is better when in reality people are still being paid like crap but corporations are still making record profits.

Not to mention that a smaller and smaller portion of the population controls a larger and larger percentage of the wealth. That is not the way to a prosperous society.

I'm curious why no one has made the connection that worker unrest and unionization corrolates to companies doing everything in their power to force workers to work harder and more for less pay. If you made working conditions better, with a fair wage and livable conditions, you wouldn't have a need for unionization of the work force

/I feel like I'm the only one who understands this concept


There are a lot of anti-unionists. I'm one, for example. I've seen unions in action  (inaction).
 
2013-03-06 10:24:44 AM

somedude210: untaken_name: AgentBang: I'm glad NPR made this point. I'm tired of hearing crowing about how things are better, people are better, everything is better when in reality people are still being paid like crap but corporations are still making record profits.

Not to mention that a smaller and smaller portion of the population controls a larger and larger percentage of the wealth. That is not the way to a prosperous society.

I'm curious why no one has made the connection that worker unrest and unionization corrolates to companies doing everything in their power to force workers to work harder and more for less pay. If you made working conditions better, with a fair wage and livable conditions, you wouldn't have a need for unionization of the work force

/I feel like I'm the only one who understands this concept


Henry Ford knew this.
 
2013-03-06 10:25:48 AM

untaken_name: There are a lot of anti-unionists. I'm one, for example. I've seen unions in action (inaction).


And I understand that, but the purpose of the unions were to protect workers from being mistreated by their employers (crap wages, horrible working conditions, etc), so while they've become a pain in the ass, at their heart, they still serve a purpose, but if you really want to get rid of unions, then you should be advocating fair wages that a person can live on, and if you can do that without needing the unions, then what do you need the unions for?

That's how you beat the unions, not do everything in your power to piss them off
 
2013-03-06 10:27:20 AM
Hobodeluxe: "private sector adds 198k jobs in Feb"

Yeah, no-one actually cares right now because the figure isn't useful for political football.
Expect it to be relatively ignored (as January's number was) until March and April's numbers provide ammo for arguing about the effect of the sequester.
Then you'll see Jan/Feb numbers in reference to March/April's, with people drawing trend lines and making up narratives however they need, to justify whatever position they already held.
 
2013-03-06 10:27:28 AM

alabasterblack: jso2897: Thunderpipes: 11% unemployment, family incomes down, growth barely in the positive, exploding debt, but good thing the stock market is good this month.

Not to mention the massive inequality of wealth distribution, which cause all those other things you mentioned. A happy stock market fixes none of these things.

The revolution will never happen. Bread and Circuses TVs and Cheetos are cheap and abundant even in the poorest home.


DEpends on what you mean by "revolution". Change is inevitable - whether you call it a "revolution" or not. What form that change will take is hidden from our eyes.
 
2013-03-06 10:35:39 AM

sewnandsilent: This guy can not, nor will not, stand for anything but limited government, lower taxes, and 4XL Dale Earnheart t-shirts!


Can he even stand?
 
2013-03-06 10:37:17 AM

rvesco: KiwDaWabbit: The DIJA is an indicator of how the economy is doing much like the BMI is an indicator of how obese you are.

So true.  My BMI is 40.9 and I'm as light as a feather.

[thevinylvillage.files.wordpress.com image 265x393]


www.phillipheath.com

BMI: 39.1
BMI Category: Severely bbese; 6 pounds away from very severely (morbidly) obese.
 
2013-03-06 10:37:52 AM
*obese
 
2013-03-06 10:38:04 AM

czetie: somedude210: Half Right: somedude210: sewnandsilent: ModernLuddite: I put all my money in the Dao Tao.

Damn it.
ftfy

both are acceptable spellings. Dao is old Chinese?

Spelling it "Tao" is still used because it's so universally recognized. It got grandfathered in.
It has always been pronounced "Dao" however, and "Dao" is the modern spelling.

ah, thought it was the reverse and Dao was old-school, Tao was the new hotness

I though that either was acceptable because it's transliterated, and the actual sound in Chinese is somewhere between a "d" and a "t" that has no exact equivalent sound in English, like the way the folks at the local Chinese restaurant pronounce "Tsingtao" beer. Sure, there are "standardized" ways to represent transliterations, but it's kind of a stretch to say that one or other is "correct".

ObTrivia: In The Seven Pillars, T.E. Lawrence shows his disdain for the various schemes for transliterating Arabic by deliberately spelling Arabic proper names in a variety of different ways. His editor was not amused.


While transliterations are always somewhat controversial (since politics inevitably become involved), the actual pronunciations are pretty well established in this case. Tao is an older Wade-Giles transliteration, whereas Dao is the  Pinyin transliteration. They're both pronounced the same, though-- "T" in W-G is pronounced like a "d" ("T+apostrophe" is the "t" sound). But despite the pronunciation being established, the written spelling is an ongoing point of contention.

Here's a really fascinating paper on the linguistic and philological origins of "Tao" (PDF) (fun fact: Tao has linguistic connections with Slavic terms for "way, track")

/BA in East Asian Studies, senior thesis on the future of character-based writing in China
 
2013-03-06 10:45:28 AM

KiwDaWabbit: rvesco: KiwDaWabbit: The DIJA is an indicator of how the economy is doing much like the BMI is an indicator of how obese you are.

So true.  My BMI is 40.9 and I'm as light as a feather.

[thevinylvillage.files.wordpress.com image 265x393]

[www.phillipheath.com image 395x400]

BMI: 39.1
BMI Category: Severely bbese; 6 pounds away from very severely (morbidly) obese.


Everyone that I have ever heard complain about how BMI is a terrible metric for determining ideal weight because it doesn't take muscle mass into account has been a big, flabby sphere of goo. For every body builder with low body fat with a "severely obese" BMI there are probably 10,000 couch potatoes of equal BMI who get wheezy just biatching about BMI.
 
2013-03-06 10:47:01 AM

Half Right: czetie: somedude210: Half Right: somedude210: sewnandsilent: ModernLuddite: I put all my money in the Dao Tao.

Damn it.
ftfy

both are acceptable spellings. Dao is old Chinese?

Spelling it "Tao" is still used because it's so universally recognized. It got grandfathered in.
It has always been pronounced "Dao" however, and "Dao" is the modern spelling.

ah, thought it was the reverse and Dao was old-school, Tao was the new hotness

I though that either was acceptable because it's transliterated, and the actual sound in Chinese is somewhere between a "d" and a "t" that has no exact equivalent sound in English, like the way the folks at the local Chinese restaurant pronounce "Tsingtao" beer. Sure, there are "standardized" ways to represent transliterations, but it's kind of a stretch to say that one or other is "correct".

ObTrivia: In The Seven Pillars, T.E. Lawrence shows his disdain for the various schemes for transliterating Arabic by deliberately spelling Arabic proper names in a variety of different ways. His editor was not amused.

While transliterations are always somewhat controversial (since politics inevitably become involved), the actual pronunciations are pretty well established in this case. Tao is an older Wade-Giles transliteration, whereas Dao is the  Pinyin transliteration. They're both pronounced the same, though-- "T" in W-G is pronounced like a "d" ("T+apostrophe" is the "t" sound). But despite the pronunciation being established, the written spelling is an ongoing point of contention.

Here's a really fascinating paper on the linguistic and philological origins of "Tao" (PDF) (fun fact: Tao has linguistic connections with Slavic terms for "way, track")

/BA in East Asian Studies, senior thesis on the future of character-based writing in China


It's like reading Romance of the Three Kingdoms in Wade-Giles and having to mentally translate Ts'ao Ts'ao as Cao Cao (the other names get a bit more pain in the ass to mentally translate on the fly)
 
2013-03-06 10:47:10 AM
Pay them? I prefer to do it this way:

imnotatoy.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-06 10:48:03 AM

somedude210: untaken_name: There are a lot of anti-unionists. I'm one, for example. I've seen unions in action (inaction).

And I understand that, but the purpose of the unions were to protect workers from being mistreated by their employers (crap wages, horrible working conditions, etc), so while they've become a pain in the ass, at their heart, they still serve a purpose, but if you really want to get rid of unions, then you should be advocating fair wages that a person can live on, and if you can do that without needing the unions, then what do you need the unions for?

That's how you beat the unions, not do everything in your power to piss them off


It's the unholy alliance between government and industry that creates the worker-unfriendly environment. When competition is difficult, workers must take what is given or nothing. When barriers to entry are low (especially artificial ones), then it's easier for workers to leave one job for another, or even to leave a job to start their own competing company in their former industry. When the companies have the backing of the government and the police powers of the state, you get things like cartels, like the ones that run every major industry in the world.  Unions are simply the pendulum swinging too far in one direction, while "company towns" are the pendulum swinging too far in the other direction. These things are cyclical, but the cycles are longer than our lifespans so it's tough for us to perceive it.
 
2013-03-06 10:49:33 AM

Pants full of macaroni!!: NPR IS TYPICAL LIBERALS, RUINING FUN IS WHAT THEY DO BEST


Once upon a time, I would have said this statement is bullshiat, because it was. But most the real journalists at NPR have quietly left over the last six years. The balance that NPR was once famous for is gone. Now it is a collection of liberal (as in the Disney version of liberalism) kiddies, who cannot write, playing journalist. I don't even think they have an editor anymore.
 
2013-03-06 10:50:26 AM
Someone at NPR will lose their job if they have to admit the Repubs were right about something...

/ Juan?
 
2013-03-06 11:03:05 AM

max_pooper: Everyone that I have ever heard complain about how BMI is a terrible metric for determining ideal weight because it doesn't take muscle mass into account has been a big, flabby sphere of goo. For every body builder with low body fat with a "severely obese" BMI there are probably 10,000 couch potatoes of equal BMI who get wheezy just biatching about BMI.


Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.

There are better ways to tell a fat person that they're fat.
 
jgi
2013-03-06 11:07:38 AM
The best thing you can do for yourself is to pay off all the debt you currently have and do not take on any new debt at all. None. That includes both student loans and mortgage debt. Stop feeding the beast. Pay cash or go without.
 
2013-03-06 11:20:47 AM

KiwDaWabbit: Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.


It's for populations, not your big-boned cousin.
 
2013-03-06 11:27:49 AM

vudukungfu: Let's do the numbers.


[Piano instrumental of "Iron Man"]
 
2013-03-06 11:38:20 AM

Half Right: czetie: somedude210: Half Right: somedude210: sewnandsilent: ModernLuddite: I put all my money in the Dao Tao.

Damn it.
ftfy

both are acceptable spellings. Dao is old Chinese?

Spelling it "Tao" is still used because it's so universally recognized. It got grandfathered in.
It has always been pronounced "Dao" however, and "Dao" is the modern spelling.

ah, thought it was the reverse and Dao was old-school, Tao was the new hotness

I though that either was acceptable because it's transliterated, and the actual sound in Chinese is somewhere between a "d" and a "t" that has no exact equivalent sound in English, like the way the folks at the local Chinese restaurant pronounce "Tsingtao" beer. Sure, there are "standardized" ways to represent transliterations, but it's kind of a stretch to say that one or other is "correct".

ObTrivia: In The Seven Pillars, T.E. Lawrence shows his disdain for the various schemes for transliterating Arabic by deliberately spelling Arabic proper names in a variety of different ways. His editor was not amused.

While transliterations are always somewhat controversial (since politics inevitably become involved), the actual pronunciations are pretty well established in this case. Tao is an older Wade-Giles transliteration, whereas Dao is the  Pinyin transliteration. They're both pronounced the same, though-- "T" in W-G is pronounced like a "d" ("T+apostrophe" is the "t" sound). But despite the pronunciation being established, the written spelling is an ongoing point of contention.

Here's a really fascinating paper on the linguistic and philological origins of "Tao" (PDF) (fun fact: Tao has linguistic connections with Slavic terms for "way, track")

/BA in East Asian Studies, senior thesis on the future of character-based writing in China


I learned something interesting. Damn you, Fark!
 
2013-03-06 11:40:41 AM

KiwDaWabbit: max_pooper: Everyone that I have ever heard complain about how BMI is a terrible metric for determining ideal weight because it doesn't take muscle mass into account has been a big, flabby sphere of goo. For every body builder with low body fat with a "severely obese" BMI there are probably 10,000 couch potatoes of equal BMI who get wheezy just biatching about BMI.

Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.

There are better ways to tell a fat person that they're fat.


Pretty sure it is a good, fast metric for judging fatness.  You can quote outliers all you want, but you will still be fat at the end of the day and BMI will still be a decent metric to gauge obesity quickly and efficiently.
 
2013-03-06 11:53:05 AM

JohnBigBootay: KiwDaWabbit: Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.

It's for populations, not your big-boned cousin.


Brontes: KiwDaWabbit: max_pooper: Everyone that I have ever heard complain about how BMI is a terrible metric for determining ideal weight because it doesn't take muscle mass into account has been a big, flabby sphere of goo. For every body builder with low body fat with a "severely obese" BMI there are probably 10,000 couch potatoes of equal BMI who get wheezy just biatching about BMI.

Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.

There are better ways to tell a fat person that they're fat.

Pretty sure it is a good, fast metric for judging fatness.  You can quote outliers all you want, but you will still be fat at the end of the day and BMI will still be a decent metric to gauge obesity quickly and efficiently.


The irony (at least I see it as irony) in what you both are saying is that laziness is a major contributing factor for obesity yet you're vociferously defending an intrinsically lazy method of gauging a health risk factor.
 
2013-03-06 11:57:17 AM

KiwDaWabbit: JohnBigBootay: KiwDaWabbit: Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.

It's for populations, not your big-boned cousin.

Brontes: KiwDaWabbit: max_pooper: Everyone that I have ever heard complain about how BMI is a terrible metric for determining ideal weight because it doesn't take muscle mass into account has been a big, flabby sphere of goo. For every body builder with low body fat with a "severely obese" BMI there are probably 10,000 couch potatoes of equal BMI who get wheezy just biatching about BMI.

Just because they are fat doesn't nullify the fact that the BMI is actually a terrible metric.

There are better ways to tell a fat person that they're fat.

Pretty sure it is a good, fast metric for judging fatness.  You can quote outliers all you want, but you will still be fat at the end of the day and BMI will still be a decent metric to gauge obesity quickly and efficiently.

The irony (at least I see it as irony) in what you both are saying is that laziness is a major contributing factor for obesity yet you're vociferously defending an intrinsically lazy method of gauging a health risk factor.


You're the only person who has mentioned laziness. You also sound extremely fat.
 
2013-03-06 12:02:25 PM

KiwDaWabbit: The irony (at least I see it as irony) in what you both are saying is that laziness is a major contributing factor for obesity yet you're vociferously defending an intrinsically lazy method of gauging a health risk factor.


It generally works just fine for most individuals in that most individuals who have a BMI in the obese range are in fact, obese. But as I said, it was designed for populations and works just fine for that purpose.

From the wiki...

BMI was explicitly cited by Keys as being appropriate for population studies, and inappropriate for individual diagnosis. Nevertheless, due to its simplicity, it came to be widely used for individual diagnosis, despite its inappropriateness.
 
2013-03-06 12:06:47 PM

JohnBigBootay: KiwDaWabbit: The irony (at least I see it as irony) in what you both are saying is that laziness is a major contributing factor for obesity yet you're vociferously defending an intrinsically lazy method of gauging a health risk factor.

It generally works just fine for most individuals in that most individuals who have a BMI in the obese range are in fact, obese. But as I said, it was designed for populations and works just fine for that purpose.

From the wiki...

BMI was explicitly cited by Keys as being appropriate for population studies, and inappropriate for individual diagnosis. Nevertheless, due to its simplicity, it came to be widely used for individual diagnosis, despite its inappropriateness.


It's not getting fat, I'm adding mass.
 
2013-03-06 12:20:43 PM
Next up, we'll discuss the viability of the horse and buggy industry.
 
2013-03-06 12:27:47 PM
This story is representative of why I gave up on traditional mass media 15 years ago.  Local and national news channels screaming "THE DOW HIT NEW RECORDS!!!11!!1!!" is an incomplete story.  Gas prices, Dow numbers, and much of life, needs to be put in perspective of inflation, as I have always taught my kids.

"OH MY GOD--GAS IS EXPENSIVE!11!11!!!!!"--Yes it has risen lately, but historically it was almost as high years ago, dipped in the '80s and '90s, and rose again.  So pegging the price perception to its lowest era feels worse than understanding the long-term behavior.

Same with government spending charts that aren't adjusted for inflation or spending per capita.  Are we spending too much per capita, or has tax revenue per capita fallen?  If we get accurate historical data, then we can scream at each other.
 
2013-03-06 12:38:13 PM

max_pooper: KiwDaWabbit: rvesco: KiwDaWabbit: The DIJA is an indicator of how the economy is doing much like the BMI is an indicator of how obese you are.

So true.  My BMI is 40.9 and I'm as light as a feather.

[thevinylvillage.files.wordpress.com image 265x393]

[www.phillipheath.com image 395x400]

BMI: 39.1
BMI Category: Severely bbese; 6 pounds away from very severely (morbidly) obese.

Everyone that I have ever heard complain about how BMI is a terrible metric for determining ideal weight because it doesn't take muscle mass into account has been a big, flabby sphere of goo. For every body builder with low body fat with a "severely obese" BMI there are probably 10,000 couch potatoes of equal BMI who get wheezy just biatching about BMI.


To continue the threadjack, I agree with you but I do think BMI falls apart at heights above 6'0". While my BMI is "normal" at 6'3, 190 it would also be normal at 6'3", 150 which would be way too thin.
 
2013-03-06 12:51:06 PM
....aaaaaaand it's gone!
 
2013-03-06 01:08:34 PM

factoryconnection: I'd say this would be a champagne, hookers and blow moment for those that bought low in 2008/9, instead of selling low after buying high.


I recently started a new job, where a make about double what I was making before (thanks, Obama...).

I had started squirreling money away to start investing... At least an e-trade account or something. But, I've decided to just wait until the market craters again, and buy closer to the bottom.

Good idea or bad?
 
2013-03-06 01:10:51 PM

KiwDaWabbit: Neither is gasoline.


======

True.  Adjusted for inflation cost of gasoline hit it's peak back in 1918.  So what?  We were not a car-centric society in 1918....most car owners from that time were well-to-do hobbyists.  What we need to look at it is the cost of gasoline...adjusted for inflation...since the end of WWII, when America bet the farm that the car was the future.   Since 1945, gasoline costs....adjusted for inflation......averaged about $2 a gallon with the exception of the two "oil shocks" of the 70s, and the Clinton years.  During Clinton's 2 terms, gasoline averaged between $1.25-$1.50 per gallon....inflation adjusted.   During the Clinton years Muricans went on an orgy of buying monster truck sized SUVs and building super-sized vinyl-clad, particle board McMansions out in the middle of Bumfark, Nowhere.  In the last few years, gasoline jumped to near its record 1918 high, except we no longer have an efficient rail system like we had in 1918.

www.networkworld.com
 
2013-03-06 01:15:36 PM

Rapmaster2000: It's not getting fat, I'm adding mass.


My uncool story is this: I am one of the people for whom BMI is not a great indicator. I lost over 50 pounds a couple years ago but still fell into the overweight category as I have freakishly large calves, chest, etc. Hard as hell to lose weight but I do two sets of bench press and my shirts no longer fit. It bugged me to the point I got into one of those dunk tanks to test my body fat. 15% biatches - and I'm 47. So BMI can eat me. But it's still a very valid tool for statistically measuring 'growing' populations. It works just fine for groups.
 
2013-03-06 01:17:42 PM

Lt. Col. Angus: I had started squirreling money away to start investing... At least an e-trade account or something. But, I've decided to just wait until the market craters again, and buy closer to the bottom.

Good idea or bad?


As long as the companies you invest in don't go completely under it'd still be a good idea to start now.  The thing about compound interest is that how much you can put in early has a huge effect toward the end.  Dollar cost averaging will see you through a crash, especially since you'll probably go through a couple of them by the time you're trying to retire.
 
2013-03-06 01:17:45 PM

jso2897: snocone: Figures do not lie.

They like big butts?


No, but LIARs figure (out a way to trick you).

/CNN says Dow at all time HIGH!  BUY NOW!*
//*Not meant to be a factual statement
///Not adjusted for inflation... or reality.
 
2013-03-06 01:34:41 PM

Lt. Col. Angus: Good idea or bad?


My opinion- good. I wouldn't start with too much though until you know how much time you can spend for research. I'd love to do this as well when I grow up some day...
 
2013-03-06 01:41:17 PM

somedude210: If you made working conditions better, with a fair wage and livable conditions, you wouldn't have a need for unionization of the work force

/I feel like I'm the only one who understands this concept


China understands this concept.
They are the largest growth market for American cars and better eating (meat - delicate cat/bird meat).
All thanks to a brand new middle class that can afford all these new luxuries.
 It all takes time.
 
2013-03-06 01:46:42 PM

alabasterblack: The revolution will never happen. Bread and Circuses TVs and Cheetos are cheap and abundant even in the poorest home.


i298.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-06 01:46:52 PM

AdolfClamwacker: Lt. Col. Angus: I had started squirreling money away to start investing... At least an e-trade account or something. But, I've decided to just wait until the market craters again, and buy closer to the bottom.

Good idea or bad?

As long as the companies you invest in don't go completely under it'd still be a good idea to start now.  The thing about compound interest is that how much you can put in early has a huge effect toward the end.  Dollar cost averaging will see you through a crash, especially since you'll probably go through a couple of them by the time you're trying to retire.


Well, this would be aside from my "real" retirement money.

Basically, *just* a market account.... i.e. can I learn to see market and industry trends, and at least keep up with, if not get out ahead of some?

I'd imagine that taking $10K and turning it into $5K in twelve months time won't encourage my wife to let me invest more.
 
2013-03-06 02:01:00 PM

alabasterblack: jso2897: Thunderpipes: 11% unemployment, family incomes down, growth barely in the positive, exploding debt, but good thing the stock market is good this month.

Not to mention the massive inequality of wealth distribution, which cause all those other things you mentioned. A happy stock market fixes none of these things.

The revolution will never happen. Bread and Circuses TVs and Cheetos are cheap and abundant even in the poorest home.


This is actually a pretty deep thought.  Never thought of things from this perspective before.  Thanks for posting.
 
2013-03-06 03:07:32 PM
It's an asset bubble getting ready to burst. Four years of Helicopter Ben's magic printing press. When Ben stops printing cash from thin air, buckle in.
 
2013-03-06 03:24:33 PM

Lt. Col. Angus: Basically, *just* a market account.... i.e. can I learn to see market and industry trends, and at least keep up with, if not get out ahead of some?

I'd imagine that taking $10K and turning it into $5K in twelve months time won't encourage my wife to let me invest more.



Very smart people make the decisions for those market accounts, and your money can be diversified in accordance with your risk-aversion. I put money into a Vanguard STAR fund every time I get paid via direct-deposit. We've adjusted our lifestyle so that I don't miss this money, and it feels really good to login every week and see it grow.

I am pleased with the return I've been seeing, but I can also sell off some shares on a whim if I need access to that money. They'll cut a check or direct-deposit into my checking account in a couple days. It's essentially a savings account that's tied to investment portfolio performance, and I'm okay with the maintenance costs at 0.34%

Once I have accumulated some amount that I haven't decided yet, I'll be putting some of the money into specific stocks so that I can play, but for me this is far superior to any bank account I could get.

Fund average annual returns (fee-adjusted)
YTD    3.37%
1 year    9.17%
3 year    9.91%
5 year    5.46%
10 year    8.27%
Since inception 03/29/1985    9.65%
 
2013-03-06 05:07:17 PM
If the New York Stock Exchange were an honest bookie joint, the gaming commission would have closed it years ago.
 
2013-03-06 05:20:26 PM
Once again, the conservative, sandwich-heavy portfolio pays off for the hungry investor.

//96 posts in, and noone quotes this?  Fark, I am disappoint.
 
2013-03-06 05:30:46 PM

Spare Me: It's an asset bubble getting ready to burst. Four years of Helicopter Ben's magic printing press. When Ben stops printing cash from thin air, buckle in.


Nice to see am radio isn't dead yet.

So what's different about this guy's printing press to all the other guys going back to at least Reagan?
 
2013-03-06 06:04:45 PM

JohnBigBootay: Spare Me: It's an asset bubble getting ready to burst. Four years of Helicopter Ben's magic printing press. When Ben stops printing cash from thin air, buckle in.

Nice to see am radio isn't dead yet.

So what's different about this guy's printing press to all the other guys going back to at least Reagan?


upload.wikimedia.org

The degree to which he used it compared to his predecessors is frightening. Spare Me is right - it's an asset bubble that is unsustainable.

I'm can't stand conspiracy theorists on AM radio either, but this is one rant that they're right about. We're awash in money, and the main reason why we haven't seen significant inflation yet is because the velocity of money is at a historical low. So the Fed can stop printing money and send us into a deflationary spiral, or they can keep printing and we'll see problematic inflation rear it's ugly head. I say that the Fed chooses the inflationary route because that's better than the alternative. Either way, there are some dark clouds on the horizon.
 
2013-03-06 06:22:43 PM
The DOW?  You mean the Deparment of Wildlife, or is your CAPS KEY STUCK????
 
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