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(Bakersfield Californian)   While internet rages over a "nurse" failing to perform CPR at a "nursing home", family of the 87 year old woman is OK with it   (bakersfieldcalifornian.com) divider line 380
    More: Followup, rage, CPR, home, California Attorney General, Kern County, legal recourse, elder abuse, nurses  
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9278 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Mar 2013 at 1:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-05 09:53:00 PM  
This whole furor is stupid to begin with regardless.  Anyone actually trained in CPR knows you do not perform CPR unless the victim is not breathing.  The 911 lady shouldn't be on 911.
 
2013-03-05 10:53:36 PM  

me texan: Anyone actually trained in CPR knows you do not perform CPR unless the victim is not breathing.


That's still not entirely true.
 
2013-03-06 12:08:57 AM  

Relatively Obscure: That's still not entirely true.


Putting someone in the rescue position is not performing CPR.
 
2013-03-06 12:14:25 AM  
I have no idea what to make of this.
 
2013-03-06 12:30:01 AM  

me texan: This whole furor is stupid to begin with regardless.  Anyone actually trained in CPR knows you do not perform CPR unless the victim is not breathing.  The 911 lady shouldn't be on 911.


Guess what? Those "respirations" that the nurse identiifed? They were ineffective, and agonal respirations - an indication to start CPR.

The woman was in a full cardiac arrest prior to the arrival of EMS crews.

Congratulations. You're defending a woman who failed to act when she should have recognized a peri-arrest condition, and failed to provide care a second year unlicensed extern should have known to provide.
 
2013-03-06 12:31:20 AM  
Of course they're happy.

Odds are, Grandma was a near-vegetable that had drained them both emotionally and financially to the brink of ruin because her body was just too stubborn to die even though the mind had checked out long ago. But, unlike if a beloved family pet's quality of life had degraded to almost nothing, no one could take Grandma to the Doctor and give her a nice sleepytime shot to put her out of her misery, because with humans, life is all about quantity, not quality.
 
2013-03-06 12:35:42 AM  

me texan: Putting someone in the rescue position is not performing CPR.


Assisting for ineffective respirations, and identifying agonal breathing is not placing someone in the rescue position.

FirstNationalBastard: Of course they're happy.

Odds are, Grandma was a near-vegetable that had drained them both emotionally and financially to the brink of ruin because her body was just too stubborn to die even though the mind had checked out long ago. But, unlike if a beloved family pet's quality of life had degraded to almost nothing, no one could take Grandma to the Doctor and give her a nice sleepytime shot to put her out of her misery, because with humans, life is all about quantity, not quality.


Unless that woman had a valid, signed DNR, or had a Doctor at her side telling her not to start CPR, that does not matter. She had a legal duty, if employed as a nurse for that facility, to act in the standard of care with basic competency, per the California Board of Nursing.

Facility policies do not trump State Nursing laws.
 
2013-03-06 12:38:30 AM  
Apparently, the woman did NOT have a Do Not Resuscitate order or Advanced Directive stating NO CPR.

It doesn't matter if the family was happy with the care or not. If she was negligent, or violated the rules of her nursing practice, she needs to be held accountable for it.
 
2013-03-06 12:44:24 AM  
This is why soylent green.
 
2013-03-06 01:07:29 AM  

hardinparamedic: Congratulations. You're defending a woman who failed to act when she should have recognized a peri-arrest condition, and failed to provide care a second year unlicensed extern should have known to provide.


I've only read one news article on the story and when she called 911 the woman was still breathing.  Up until reading further comments, I was not even aware the woman died.  If there are more details in this story, I cant see them -  FTFA: Please enable browser cookies to read the rest of this story.

Obviously if she was breathing and went to not breathing / cardiac arrest then at that point CPR should be administered.  From what I'd seen before the responder had identified the person as breathing.  Now that I'm reading an article I see the facility had a DNR policy and that everyone is informed when going there and agrees to it before they can be admitted.  I have no idea legally how that will stand in court, but if that's the policy and it was known and agreed upon by the victim then I dont have a problem with them sticking to it and apparently neither does the family.
 
2013-03-06 01:16:46 AM  

Relatively Obscure: me texan: Anyone actually trained in CPR knows you do not perform CPR unless the victim is not breathing.

That's still not entirely true.


For lay rescuers it is.

This lady was not in a nursing home. She lived in an apartment building for old people. It was not a medical facility and had no medical staff. Whether she had a DNR or not is irrelevant until EMS showed up.
Even then if a family member says to ignore it, you have to ignore it. They are pretty worthless.

According to the family, it was her choice to live there and she didn't want her life prolonged.
Good for her. She got what she wanted.

Oh, and the article changed.This has a lot more stuff now.

here is the families statment

"Our mother and grandmother was a remarkable and intelligent woman who was blessed to have a great life of 87 years. It is the wish of our family to honor and celebrate her life at this personal time.
"Like so many seniors, it was our mother's wish to live independently. She was fully aware that Glenwood Gardens did not offer trained medical staff. Even so, she personally selected the senior living community, and our family has come to know the staff and been very pleased with Glenwood Gardens as her home.
"It was our beloved mother and grandmother's wish to die naturally and without any kind of life-prolonging intervention. Our family respects the right of all people to make their own life choices in such cases.
"We regret that this private and most personal time has been escalated by the media. Caregivers, nurses and other medical professionals have very difficult waters to tread in the legal and medical landscape of our country today.
"We understand that the 911 tape of this event has caused concern, but our family knows that mom had full knowledge of the limitations of Glenwood Gardens, and is at peace. We also have no desire, nor is it the nature of our family, to seek legal recourse or try to profit from what is a lesson we can all learn from.
"We wish to focus on our family at this time, and this will be our final comment on this personal matter."


You'll get over it. They did.
 
2013-03-06 01:20:47 AM  

hardinparamedic: It doesn't matter if the family was happy with the care or not. If she was negligent, or violated the rules of her nursing practice, she needs to be held accountable for it.


She's not a nurse. She had no duty to act. I still haven't heard the 911 recording where she identifies herself as a nurse either. I've just read it.
 
2013-03-06 01:24:29 AM  

me texan: I've only read one news article on the story and when she called 911 the woman was still breathing.  Up until reading further comments, I was not even aware the woman died.  If there are more details in this story, I cant see them -  FTFA: Please enable browser cookies to read the rest of this story.


Since you don't know what happens when you  call 911, I'll try to explain in a less harsh manner of events.

When you call 911, you talk to someone who is a certified emergency medical dispatcher in about 95% of the United States, if not APCO or NAED Public Safety Dispatcher certified.  They have a program called Priority Dispatch they use to level the acuity of a call, determine the response requirements - Fire Truck, EMS, Rescue - and whether they respond with lights and sirens or not, and if necessary, provide pre-arrival instructions. Most places use a computerized system called ProQA now, but older dispatch centers and those in rural areas still use the flip card system.

When this "nurse" called 911, the information she gave the dispatcher - collapse with unresponsiveness and ineffective breathing - leads to the 9 Echo 1 Card, which is Cardiac Arrest/Respiratory Arrest - Questionable Life Status card, and tells the dispatcher to initiate the pre-arrival CPR instruction set. Had a physician been on scene, they would have lead into the 37 Delta Card, which specifies an Emergency Response to medically capable personnel.

ProQA and Priority Dispatch systems are evidence based interventions that have been successfully defended in court multiple times, and are signed off on by a physician. This is not something a dispatcher just tells someone to do. In fact, dispatchers are legally prohibited from giving medical instruction outside of the ProQA/PD protocols their medical director has signed off on.

me texan: Obviously if she was breathing and went to not breathing / cardiac arrest then at that point CPR should be administered.  From what I'd seen before the responder had identified the person as breathing.


That's actually not true, and is the result of vague initial reporting.

FTFA Linked:  Firefighters and ambulance personnel arrived at the facility seven minutes after the call came in, Miller said. The county does not know who made the call, he said.The woman had no pulse and wasn't breathing when fire crews found her lying on the floor, Bakersfield Fire Department spokesman Anthony Galagaza added.They started CPR and loaded her onto a gurney. The woman was later declared dead at Mercy Southwest Hospital.

me texan: Now that I'm reading an article I see the facility had a DNR policy and that everyone is informed when going there and agrees to it before they can be admitted.


A DNR policy, in and of itsself, is worthless unless every patient has a properly filled out and signed/notarized DNR form which specifies the scope of resuscitation effort to be undertaken. This is Tennessee's, for example. Verbal orders are not accepted, and the physician must have a signed medical order in the chart for it to be honored. It also has to be in hand and continue in the chain of custody with the body as part of the medical record. Some states WILL allow for a hand-written medical order in absence of a DNR in the chart, but according to the article they did not have one on her.

DNRs are really worth the paper they're printed on. Any question of their validity, and they can be legally ignored. If they are incomplete or lack signatures at any point, they're ignored. And if the family wants you to ignore it, they're ignored.

me texan: I have no idea legally how that will stand in court, but if that's the policy and it was known and agreed upon by the victim then I dont have a problem with them sticking to it and apparently neither does the family.


If she didn't have a DNR in hand OR a physician telling her not to perform CPR right then and there, and - as the situation seems to indicate - a licensed nurse refused to perform CPR on a patient who it was clearly indicated on, that's a violation of the standard of care despite the , and borders on criminal negligence depending on the situation surrounding it. If she failed to recognize ineffective respiration and render aid, she committed incompetence as well as negligence, and her failure to treat lead directly to the arrest state ostensibly.
 
2013-03-06 01:28:25 AM  

cretinbob: She's not a nurse. She had no duty to act. I still haven't heard the 911 recording where she identifies herself as a nurse either. I've just read it.


Really? Because every article I've read on the matter identifies her as a "nurse".
 
2013-03-06 01:37:20 AM  
A fairly recent poll of doctors found that they'd reject most extreme life-saving measures, including CPR.

Why? Because doctors know that these procedures have a terrible record when it comes to saving lives, and, even on the rare occasions when they do save lives for any meaningful length of time, regularly result in permanent disability.

/don't have time for cite. You have teh google.
 
2013-03-06 01:41:23 AM  

ThunderPelvis: A fairly recent poll of doctors found that they'd reject most extreme life-saving measures, including CPR.

Why? Because doctors know that these procedures have a terrible record when it comes to saving lives, and, even on the rare occasions when they do save lives for any meaningful length of time, regularly result in permanent disability.

/don't have time for cite. You have teh google.


Except for the fact that some arrests are highly survivable, even at old age, with prompt bystander care and BLS into ACLS care, combined with rapid transport to a cardiac facility. In-hospital Cardiac Arrest survival approaches 75%.

The AHA is very specific on this. You don't get to play god because you think you can decide who can leave the hospital with a CPC score of 1.
 
2013-03-06 01:44:37 AM  
hardinparamedic <wall of text>

I am sure you have some valid points in there, but I am not reading it.  You've made me regret even having stated an opinion, regardless of how informed or lack thereof I was of the situation.
 
2013-03-06 01:48:27 AM  

cretinbob: She's not a nurse. She had no duty to act.


morally she did.
 
2013-03-06 01:49:28 AM  
When it's someone's time to go, sometimes it's better to just let them go.

This person's family shunted her into a nursing home. She was closing in on 90 years of life. She'd lived a long one, if not a good one. The next few would be filled with pain and loneliness.

Goodbye grandma. May you rest in peace.
 
2013-03-06 01:52:00 AM  

me texan: I am sure you have some valid points in there, but I am not reading it. You've made me regret even having stated an opinion, regardless of how informed or lack thereof I was of the situation.


That really kind of sums up fark.

Give an opinion where you say everyone else is stupid, on a subject that you know nothing about. when given a point by point rebuttal that shows you don't know WTF you're talking about, say you won't read it because....something. Then walk away feeling superior.
 
2013-03-06 01:53:32 AM  

hardinparamedic: Apparently, the woman did NOT have a Do Not Resuscitate order or Advanced Directive stating NO CPR.

It doesn't matter if the family was happy with the care or not. If she was negligent, or violated the rules of her nursing practice, she needs to be held accountable for it.


Except its not a nursing facility and the residents are informed of what care will and will not be given when they choose to live there instead of the assisted living facility or the full nursing facility also run by the same organization.
  While I can understand why some people are seemingly upset over what happened, the family is ok with it, so it should all be good.  Just because it is theoretically possible to extend someones life doesn't mean we have to try and extend their life at any point unless they are in a medical facility that is under standards to take all measures unless otherwise specified.   CPR most likely wouldn't have saved her life, and it could have potentially been worse by instead extending it just long enough to die in a hospital a day or two later disoriented and dealing with pain from a few bruised or broken ribs (very possible for an 87 year old getting CPR).
 
2013-03-06 01:57:39 AM  
So, the family that dumped her there has no problem with the fact that she's dead?

Weird. It's almost as if they didn't actually care all that much.
 
2013-03-06 01:57:49 AM  
Hello everybody, this is fark.com ... your opinions will always go down the drain.
 
2013-03-06 01:58:42 AM  

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: Except its not a nursing facility and the residents are informed of what care will and will not be given when they choose to live there instead of the assisted living facility or the full nursing facility also run by the same organization.


It does not matter if that woman was a licensed nurse in the employ of that capacity in that "assisted living" facility. Her employment as a nurse means she is held to the standards of the California Board of Nursing, and required to adhere to the standards of care that board expects, given the capabilities she had at the time. The client-provider relationship alone creates a duty to rescue, and a duty to act.

Facility policy does not trump the State Guidelines for standard of care, and the requirement of a physician order or signed, properly executed DNR/Advanced Directive to be present for CPR and lifesaving care to be withheld.

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: While I can understand why some people are seemingly upset over what happened, the family is ok with it, so it should all be good.


And that's good. There will be no civil action, and the family can have their peace. The problem here is that a person either identified herself as a "nurse" falsely, or was a licensed nurse who refused to perform her state's expected standard of care. It doesn't matter, in that case, if her patient's family was happy with the standard of care.

Her actions directly contributed to the death of a patient. If her only justification was "it's our policy", she's about to find out how harsh a medical licensing board can be.

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: Just because it is theoretically possible to extend someones life doesn't mean we have to try and extend their life at any point unless they are in a medical facility that is under standards to take all measures unless otherwise specified.   CPR most likely wouldn't have saved her life, and it could have potentially been worse by instead extending it just long enough to die in a hospital a day or two later disoriented and dealing with pain from a few bruised or broken ribs (very possible for an 87 year old getting CPR).


You're missing the point. By state and federal law, you do not get to make that decision. That patient, through his/her advanced directives and DNR, and a Physician who can justify the witholding of resuscitative care is the only ones who can do so.
 
2013-03-06 01:59:43 AM  

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: Except its not a nursing facility


irrelevant,

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: and the residents are informed of what care will and will not be given when they choose to live there


You think they were informed that during a medical emergency the staff would call 911 then refuse to do what 911 told them to do?

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: CPR most likely wouldn't have saved her life


you know this how?
 
2013-03-06 02:01:52 AM  

hardinparamedic: Her actions directly contributed to the death of a patient.


'Contributed' is a very weasely word here.
 
2013-03-06 02:03:17 AM  

hardinparamedic: You're missing the point. By state and federal law, you do not get to make that decision. That patient, through his/her advanced directives and DNR, and a Physician who can justify the witholding of resuscitative care is the only ones who can do so.


sheesh, I didn't know we had the king o' nurses on fark. who gives a crap, an old person lived in a place where she knew there weren't first responders and shockingly when she needed one, there weren't any and her family is shrugging it off. if you're that worked up about it, make sure your relatives and you lives in a place with actual medical staff on site when they/you get old. otherwise, whatever
 
2013-03-06 02:04:08 AM  
my first thought was that she had let the RN know she was to be no code when its time
 
2013-03-06 02:06:35 AM  
Then get a DNR, jackasses.
 
2013-03-06 02:07:25 AM  
When my 95 year old grandmother was in a car accident, we didn't know she had a DNR (the sister who was in charge of that stuff was in labor when it happened; big clusterfark all around due to pre-eclampsia). So they tried various things to keep her alive for the ~ day it took my father to drive to IN from NY, and when he got there he had them continue since it took another few days for us to get the info. We still had hope at that point so they kept trying.

It ended up being a two week ordeal where she 'improved' then got worse and repeat.

No one can definitively say whether such treatment will work. Best bet is talk over the options with your loved (or un-loved) one ahead of time.
 
2013-03-06 02:07:40 AM  
As I understand it the facility had the residents sign an agreement to their "no cpr" policy. Does that legally absolve them?
 
2013-03-06 02:08:04 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 'Contributed' is a very weasely word here.


How so? If this woman was a nurse, her training should have lead her to be able to identify the fact that this woman needed assistance, and her duty to act (if she's receiving a paycheck as a nurse) should have prompted her to render basic emergency aid until the arrival of more trained personnel. Even if this meant assisting respiration through mouth to mouth.

Her failure to act was a direct contributory factor here as a licensed nurse.

tlchwi02: sheesh, I didn't know we had the king o' nurses on fark


How dare I demand high standards out of people who's jobs demand they care for people.

No. I know the shenanigans and horrific treatment that nursing home patients, and many assisted living residents, receive. That's why it's not a stretch to see this person letting someone die.

tlchwi02: who gives a crap


Please never enter healthcare. Never touch a living, breathing creature with that attitude.
 
2013-03-06 02:08:17 AM  
We have plenty of old people on this planet not contributing to the wealth of any nation.  They're not exactly a scarce, pecious resource.  Other people will become old and take their place, eventually.
 
2013-03-06 02:08:28 AM  

hardinparamedic: me texan: This whole furor is stupid to begin with regardless.  Anyone actually trained in CPR knows you do not perform CPR unless the victim is not breathing.  The 911 lady shouldn't be on 911.

Guess what? Those "respirations" that the nurse identiifed? They were ineffective, and agonal respirations - an indication to start CPR.

The woman was in a full cardiac arrest prior to the arrival of EMS crews.

Congratulations. You're defending a woman who failed to act when she should have recognized a peri-arrest condition, and failed to provide care a second year unlicensed extern should have known to provide.


Dude...give it a REST already.

We get it.  You love being a white knight.

the family doesnt care...your indignation over what happened is pointless.
 
2013-03-06 02:09:48 AM  

tlchwi02: sheesh, I didn't know we had the king o' nurses on fark. who gives a crap, an old person lived in a place where she knew there weren't first responders and shockingly when she needed one, there weren't any and her family is shrugging it off. if you're that worked up about it, make sure your relatives and you lives in a place with actual medical staff on site when they/you get old. otherwise, whatever


Like who totally cares about like this. geesh. like an old died n'stuff and like who cares. I don't like get why you people comment on topics that I don't care about or take the time to understand. gosh.
 
2013-03-06 02:10:10 AM  
That's what she said.
pjmedia.com
 
2013-03-06 02:11:35 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: Dude...give it a REST already.


no kidding.

STOP COMMENTING ON THE TOPIC PEOPLE! JUST SAY THINGS LIKE "WHO CARES" AND MOVE ON!
 
2013-03-06 02:11:37 AM  

cretinbob: hardinparamedic: It doesn't matter if the family was happy with the care or not. If she was negligent, or violated the rules of her nursing practice, she needs to be held accountable for it.

She's not a nurse. She had no duty to act. I still haven't heard the 911 recording where she identifies herself as a nurse either. I've just read it.


I've heard the 911 call several times as they repeated it ad nauseum on the news, and she made it quite clear that she was a nurse.

Here's a link that can not make that fact any clearer. The Chyron caption reads "Nurse refuse to perform CPR".
You can hear her say it at 1:14.
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/911-call-audio-retirement-home-nurse -r efuses-woman-18646490
 
2013-03-06 02:12:33 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: We get it.  You love being a white knight.


Expecting a nurse to act in the standards and basic competence of her profession, according to the rules set forth by the California board of nursing is a white knight?

You made a comment on the last thread that your action has saved "100s" of lives. Can I ask what you do?

The more you eat the more you fart: the family doesnt care...your indignation over what happened is pointless.


My indignation is purely professional. It has nothing to do with the family.
 
2013-03-06 02:12:41 AM  

hardinparamedic: Apparently, the woman did NOT have a Do Not Resuscitate order or Advanced Directive stating NO CPR.

It doesn't matter if the family was happy with the care or not. If she was negligent, or violated the rules of her nursing practice, she needs to be held accountable for it.


While I would tend to agree...yelling "STRING HER UP!!!!" because you like looking like a hero/white knight doesn't change the fact that the FAMILY didn't want her resuscitated anyhow.

time to let it go.  If the family of the woman can let it go...you probably should, too.
 
2013-03-06 02:14:15 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: the FAMILY didn't want her resuscitated anyhow.


that's not what the article that you didn't read says.
 
2013-03-06 02:16:39 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: While I would tend to agree...yelling "STRING HER UP!!!!" because you like looking like a hero/white knight doesn't change the fact that the FAMILY didn't want her resuscitated anyhow.


Um, okay. Please provide written documentation of that patient's wishes in the form of a legally admissible DNR or Advanced Directive form that is properly filled out and signed by that patient, her proxy, or the physician.

It's not about "being a hero", and I'm not "white knighting" anyone. I'm demanding a healthcare practitioner act within the ethical and legal guidelines of her profession.

And I'm not yelling String her up. This nurse deserves scrutiny, but this is an institutional failure, period. The fact California, which allows Nurse Practitioners to practice independently of a physician, has such a shocking legal loophole in their laws is mind-blowing.
 
2013-03-06 02:17:10 AM  
I just hope they remembered to shoot her in the head before she turned. Becoming a zombie is so undignified.
 
2013-03-06 02:17:35 AM  

log_jammin: The more you eat the more you fart: the FAMILY didn't want her resuscitated anyhow.

that's not what the article that you didn't read says.


REALLY?!

The family's response to the media "outrage"....

"Our mother and grandmother was a remarkable and intelligent woman who was blessed to have a great life of 87 years. It is the wish of our family to honor and celebrate her life at this personal time.
"Like so many seniors, it was our mother's wish to live independently. <b>She was fully aware that Glenwood Gardens did not offer trained medical staff</b>. Even so, she personally selected the senior living community, and our family has come to know the staff and been very pleased with Glenwood Gardens as her home.
<b>"It was our beloved mother and grandmother's wish to die naturally and without any kind of life-prolonging intervention. Our family respects the right of all people to make their own life choices in such cases.</b>
"We regret that this private and most personal time has been escalated by the media. Caregivers, nurses and other medical professionals have very difficult waters to tread in the legal and medical landscape of our country today.
"We understand that the 911 tape of this event has caused concern, but<b> our family knows that mom had full knowledge of the limitations of Glenwood Gardens, and is at peace.
 </b>


Take note of the statements in bold.  Guess you missed that right?
 
2013-03-06 02:18:15 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: Of course they're happy.

Odds are, Grandma was a near-vegetable that had drained them both emotionally and financially to the brink of ruin because her body was just too stubborn to die even though the mind had checked out long ago. But, unlike if a beloved family pet's quality of life had degraded to almost nothing, no one could take Grandma to the Doctor and give her a nice sleepytime shot to put her out of her misery, because with humans, life is all about quantity, not quality.


Yup.

And oh, you're going to perform manual chest compressions on an 87 year old who is in nursing-home-care level of physical degradation?
Look, I've had two grandmothers reach that age and condition-I couldn't even give them a strong HUG without worrying about breaking ribs.  Now, admittably, I'm 240 lbs of construction worker these days, so my "hugs" and my "chest compressions" pack a lot more force than most peoples' (and my medical training is limited to first aid appropriate for use on other oversized construction workers)--but even a 100 lb "hospice aide" would likely only succeed in turning "cardiac arrest" into "cardiac laceration".

Sorry, HardinMedic, if the law says that then the law is an ass.  "In-Hospital", yes.  But this wasn't a hospital-it was a "nursing home".  The chief difference being, I believe, a lack of "cardiac facility" as well as the advanced options available in a full crash cart.
 
2013-03-06 02:18:46 AM  
The lady that died hated all of you and would have eaten you raw with tartar sauce given the opportunity.

So there.
 
2013-03-06 02:19:06 AM  
so was she hot?
 
2013-03-06 02:19:23 AM  
"Our mother and grandmother was a remarkable and intelligent woman who was blessed to have a great life of 87 years. It is the wish of our family to honor and celebrate her life at this personal time.
"Like so many seniors, it was our mother's wish to live independently. She was fully aware that Glenwood Gardens did not offer trained medical staff. Even so, she personally selected the senior living community, and our family has come to know the staff and been very pleased with Glenwood Gardens as her home.
"It was our beloved mother and grandmother's wish to die naturally and without any kind of life-prolonging intervention. Our family respects the right of all people to make their own life choices in such cases.
"We regret that this private and most personal time has been escalated by the media. Caregivers, nurses and other medical professionals have very difficult waters to tread in the legal and medical landscape of our country today.
"We understand that the 911 tape of this event has caused concern, but our family knows that mom had full knowledge of the limitations of Glenwood Gardens, and is at peace.
Key statements MADE BY THE FAMILY in bold.

Everyone, including mr indignant paramedic guy...can now go have a beer and let your blood pressure go back to normal.
 
2013-03-06 02:19:47 AM  

hardinparamedic: ProQA and Priority Dispatch systems are evidence based interventions that have been successfully defended in court multiple times, and are signed off on by a physician. This is not something a dispatcher just tells someone to do. In fact, dispatchers are legally prohibited from giving medical instruction outside of the ProQA/PD protocols their medical director has signed off on.


The facility's policy takes precedence over what the 911 dispatcher says.
 
2013-03-06 02:19:53 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: hardinparamedic: Apparently, the woman did NOT have a Do Not Resuscitate order or Advanced Directive stating NO CPR.

It doesn't matter if the family was happy with the care or not. If she was negligent, or violated the rules of her nursing practice, she needs to be held accountable for it.

While I would tend to agree...yelling "STRING HER UP!!!!" because you like looking like a hero/white knight doesn't change the fact that the FAMILY didn't want her resuscitated anyhow.

time to let it go.  If the family of the woman can let it go...you probably should, too.


Just read a story about a guy who beat his 2 year old to death.

Far be it from me to form a moral opinion on others' family matters, right?

I mean, if family can let it go...I probably should too, right?
 
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