If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Sun Sentinel)   Nightmare bacteria on the rise in the US, though that might just be a band name   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 10
    More: PSA, United States, nightmares, Nightmare bacteria, National Institutes of Health, antibiotics, northeastern states, bacteria, commercial real estate  
•       •       •

5704 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Mar 2013 at 11:35 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-03-06 01:47:21 AM
2 votes:

Scythed: We've had a treatment for these things for a century now. They're called bacteriophages and they work much better than antibiotics. Sadly, the drug companies can't make money off of them so they'd rather just let thousands of people die while they search for a more profitable cure.


No, the problem is that each phage strain is specific to an individual bacterial strain, and are absolutely useless in multi-organism infections and time-critical sepsis where the delay to wait on a C&S might cause a patient's death. You have to determine what is causing the infection, deliver the phage to that source of the infection without provoking an immune response, and then effectively do so in concentrations which kills the bacteria. The Soviets did a LOT of research during the cold war on phage therapy, and the introduction of a foreign antigenic substance poses the risk of provoking further immune response as well. In addition to this, some phages impart increased pathogenicity or toxicity to certain bacterial strains, like the EHC-Toxin gene for E. Coli.

And that's ignoring the fact that there's a reason some antibiotics are bacteriostatic and not bacteriocidal. It's generally a bad idea to cause mass cell lysis of Gram Positive organisms, like Staphylococcus, due to enterotoxins.
2013-03-06 01:21:51 AM
2 votes:

Gyrfalcon: It's not his fault. Blame people who go to the doctor for the flu or a runny nose and just have to have "a shot"; and the quack doctors who give them one knowing full well that penicillin does nothing for viruses.


Don't forget about the agricultural industry's contribution.
2013-03-06 12:13:14 AM
2 votes:
If a nurse or other professional comes into your room to change a dressing or do anything to a wound, change a catheter, or in essence perform any kind of function that results in stuff going inside your body, tell them to wash their hands first, before they touch you.

This is so lax that it's shocking.

Wash your damn hands.
2013-03-06 01:37:08 AM
1 votes:
Medic Zero:That is a sterile procedure, I've seen it done dozens and dozens of times, always with sterile gloves. Although they aren't "changed" very often, but they do get inserted. These days you may get one inserted multiple times because insurance companies think that no one should have a catheter in anymore, so instead you get in and out caths multiple times.

Oh, the fun part comes in with central lines.

If a physician inserts one in an emergency without putting on a mask and hair cap, it has to be pulled within 8 - 12 hours depending on the facility and a new one inserted.

You have to have written physician justification and review after each shift as to why the patient needs to keep a central line.

Dressing changes are a highly sterile procedure, they make our nurses sterile gown, mask, and net up when doing it.

I do not envy, or want the job of a PICC/Vascular nurse. If I had to do hours of dressing changes every shift, I'd go insane.
2013-03-06 01:31:57 AM
1 votes:

Mark Ratner: The bacteria have become self-aware. Everybody panic!!, or just wash your hands after you pee and you'll be fine.


I have always wondered about that one.  My johnson has been hanging out in clean underwear all day long.  My hands have been typing on a keyboard that hasn't been cleaned since the Reagan Administration.  Wouldn't it make more sense to wash my hands before I pee?
2013-03-06 01:07:29 AM
1 votes:

Amos Quito: On our next episode of "Heroes to Zeroes"

[upload.wikimedia.org image 512x385]
Alexander Fleming

Once credited as a "hero" for discovering penicillin in 1928, Fleming is now
recognized as the "Father of the Superbug" that will KILL US ALL!

/Tune in
//Turn on
//Drop dead


It's not his fault. Blame people who go to the doctor for the flu or a runny nose and just have to have "a shot"; and the quack doctors who give them one knowing full well that penicillin does nothing for viruses.
2013-03-06 12:42:47 AM
1 votes:
I'm genuinely surprised that this isn't about C. Diff.
2013-03-06 12:14:11 AM
1 votes:
 I had no idea bacteria cause nightmares. I thought it was the work of sexy demons like Incubi and Succubi.

Live and learn.

It does make sense though, because if you eat a lot of nasty junk food before bed, or even a nice cheese, you get nightmares.

Yogurt doesn't seem to cause nightmares. Must be the friendly pro-health bacteria in the yoghurt.

When I need to go to the bathroom when I am asleep, I dream of filthy toilets or else that I am naked except for maybe a pajama top or something. This is my early warning dream system telling, wake the Hell up and go to the bathroom.

If you have children who are wetting the bed, tell them to dream about places they can't pee to wake themselves up. Let me know if it works. I think it might help program the part of their brain that stands guard during sleep. The brain thinks in metaphors. It doesn't do similes very well as far as I can tell.
2013-03-06 12:08:33 AM
1 votes:
The bacteria have become self-aware. Everybody panic!!, or just wash your hands after you pee and you'll be fine.
2013-03-05 08:52:41 PM
1 votes:
It's been done

Bacillus anthracis
 
Displayed 10 of 10 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report