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(CareerBuilder)   Fifteen college majors with starting salaries over $50K. Of course, 8 of the top 10 are engineering and IT. Suck it, haters   (msn.careerbuilder.com) divider line 42
    More: Interesting, academic major, Association of Colleges, civil engineers, chemical engineer, business administration, nursing, bachelor's degrees, computer engineering  
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445 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 05 Mar 2013 at 11:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-05 09:41:30 AM
Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.
 
2013-03-05 09:44:11 AM
We could if we could find it, Princess Tinymeat.
 
2013-03-05 09:46:13 AM
My Classics degree didn't top 50k until my 4th year out. Then it dropped below 50k in 2002 and didn't claw back over it till 2004.

Morde manubrium meum, stereotypers.
 
2013-03-05 09:53:38 AM
There is no correlation between the salary increase they show for 2011 to 2012 and the "percent change" they list.  Am I missing something there?
 
2013-03-05 10:01:18 AM
Technical skills + who-cares degree = technical career. The degree never had to have done anything if you spent your college getting good at tech. Worked all sorts of server/support/helpdesk jobs in college, and went right into employment easy speasy despite my degree being a dogpile of liberal studies and various electives.
 
2013-03-05 10:11:44 AM
If you can pass Calculus 5 than you earned at least 50k a year.
 
2013-03-05 10:16:02 AM
Not really new news... the whole "omg college graduates can't find jobs!" has always been mostly about people graduating with psychology and esoteric history degrees, instead of something that can get you a job in the marketplace.   Even at the worst of the economic crisis, skilled Technology and Healthcare sector unemployment rates were only at 3-4%.
 
2013-03-05 10:17:03 AM
And since when did Fark start hating on Engineers and IT?! I thought most of Fark was Engineers and IT!

Engineers and IT people who have mastered 5 different martial arts, date a supermodel and have to be in the gym in 26 minutes.
 
2013-03-05 10:20:39 AM

dletter: Not really new news... the whole "omg college graduates can't find jobs!" has always been mostly about people graduating with psychology and esoteric history degrees, instead of something that can get you a job in the marketplace.   Even at the worst of the economic crisis, skilled Technology and Healthcare sector unemployment rates were only at 3-4%.


That.  Though health care has tapered off a little while IT has picked up quite a bit.  All through last year, I saw entry level jobs pick up quite a bit...at least in my area.
 
2013-03-05 10:26:24 AM

FTDA: Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.


dancininanson.net
 
2013-03-05 10:27:07 AM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: And since when did Fark start hating on Engineers and IT?! I thought most of Fark was Engineers and IT!

Engineers and IT people who have mastered 5 different martial arts, date a supermodel and have to be in the gym in 26 minutes.


I'm in IT.  Graduated with honors in Philosophy.

No supermodels, though.
 
2013-03-05 10:27:15 AM

dletter: Not really new news... the whole "omg college graduates can't find jobs!" has always been mostly about people graduating with psychology and esoteric history degrees, instead of something that can get you a job in the marketplace.   Even at the worst of the economic crisis, skilled Technology and Healthcare sector unemployment rates were only at 3-4%.


Its also been a staple of year-end reporting since the 1970s. Something this years crop of snowflakes-with-trophies hasn't really gotten their head around yet, too busy Occupying and blaming everything and moving back with mom.
 
2013-03-05 10:28:59 AM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: And since when did Fark start hating on Engineers and IT?! I thought most of Fark was Engineers and IT!

Engineers and IT people who have mastered 5 different martial arts, date a supermodel and have to be in the gym in 26 minutes.


25 since I stopped to read this thread.
 
2013-03-05 10:34:32 AM

Generation_D: Technical skills + who-cares degree = technical career. The degree never had to have done anything if you spent your college getting good at tech. Worked all sorts of server/support/helpdesk jobs in college, and went right into employment easy speasy despite my degree being a dogpile of liberal studies and various electives.


This.
 
2013-03-05 10:35:22 AM

Generation_D: Something this years crop of snowflakes-with-trophies hasn't really gotten their head around yet, too busy Occupying and blaming everything and moving back with mom.


"Generation Whine"
 
2013-03-05 10:49:28 AM

Diogenes: I'm in IT. Graduated with honors in Philosophy.

No supermodels, though.


Honors in Philosophy and no ninja skills, you want us to mock you dont ya?

Dancin_In_Anson: "Generation Whine"


This generation (what are we calling them?) is no different from any other. You get this story every year. Mostly because journalism students write this bs, and really when have they every had a good job market leaving college?!
 
2013-03-05 10:54:43 AM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: you want us to mock you dont ya?


I pay $5 a month for it.
 
2013-03-05 10:59:47 AM

Diogenes: The Stealth Hippopotamus: you want us to mock you dont ya?

I pay $5 a month for it.


I know what you mean! ;)
 
2013-03-05 11:24:58 AM

FTDA: Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.


THis.  This this this.    After working in a museum for two years and networking with those actually in my field, they tell me I'm screwed without practical experience.   And I'm not the only one but Jesus, how can I get practical experience when my time is spent in class and working to pay bills?  It is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO god damned frustrating to be told that, 'Yea, you have the degrees but we need someone who has 1+ years doing it already'.   GAHHHHHHHHHHH!!!


*deep breath*
/Already did internships and fieldwork and it's NOT ENOUGH
//Sorry Farkers, you are my therapy this early morning
///back to Ignoring those student loan bills again
 
2013-03-05 11:30:06 AM

raerae1980: THis. This this this. After working in a museum for two years and networking with those actually in my field, they tell me I'm screwed without practical experience


What's your field?
 
2013-03-05 11:33:28 AM

raerae1980: FTDA: Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.

THis.  This this this.    After working in a museum for two years and networking with those actually in my field, they tell me I'm screwed without practical experience.   And I'm not the only one but Jesus, how can I get practical experience when my time is spent in class and working to pay bills?  It is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO god damned frustrating to be told that, 'Yea, you have the degrees but we need someone who has 1+ years doing it already'.   GAHHHHHHHHHHH!!!


*deep breath*
/Already did internships and fieldwork and it's NOT ENOUGH
//Sorry Farkers, you are my therapy this early morning
///back to Ignoring those student loan bills again


There IS the whole matter of you need to actually look for work in areas that are hiring. Just deciding at age 18-20 that you want to be (something awesome and fun) is going to get you right back working sh*t jobs once you graduate if its 1,000 to 1 shot they are hiring in your field.

Its baffling to some of us how you can get all the way through college believing they'd be hiring if the answer was a hard "no" without experience, which apparently wasn't available in college. Thats kind of WTF.

Its funny watching people just now realizing they just partied and studied for 4-6 years and will be behind their peers that just went to work in the first place. Except for the lucky few who actually get jobs in their chosen field.

Thats the other thing, you don't always get to choose a field. You are in college with a whole campus full of resources from networks and computer labs to entrepreneurial labs and libraries. You mean in 4 years time all you did was get a degree or work an internship that did not lead to being employable?

WTF. Thats on you. College hasnt been a rubber-stamp employment launch since the 1980s unless you mean in very specific fields, like Actuary or Nurse or something like that, things that the college experience is directly tied to entry level employment. All college is otherwise is a chance to get a credential. Its still entirely on you in this world's economy to come up with a plan that will get you hired once you get out. And a fall back plan as well, probably.
 
2013-03-05 11:33:32 AM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Engineers and IT people who have mastered 5 different martial arts, date a supermodel and have to be in the gym in 26 minutes.


While you are clearly describing me, I don't have to be at the gym today.  That's next month.
 
2013-03-05 11:43:22 AM
As someone with an Information Systems degree contemplating a move into finance, I am neutral about this article.

/About done with people losing their shiat over their chat program not working.
 
2013-03-05 11:44:45 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: FTDA: Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.

[dancininanson.net image 235x163]


With a degree and no experience, you're under experienced.  With a degree and lots of experience you run the risk of being over qualified.  I loathe both terms.
 
2013-03-05 11:47:44 AM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: And since when did Fark start hating on Engineers and IT?! I thought most of Fark was Engineers and IT!

Engineers and IT people who have mastered 5 different martial arts, date a supermodel and have to be in the gym in 26 minutes.


Your Cisco-fu is impressive, most impressive.  But you're not a CCIE yet!
 
2013-03-05 11:57:01 AM

FTDA: With a degree and no experience, you're under experienced. With a degree and lots of experience you run the risk of being over qualified.


I guess it depends on the field.
 
2013-03-05 12:10:10 PM

Generation_D: raerae1980: FTDA: Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.

THis.  This this this.    After working in a museum for two years and networking with those actually in my field, they tell me I'm screwed without practical experience.   And I'm not the only one but Jesus, how can I get practical experience when my time is spent in class and working to pay bills?  It is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO god damned frustrating to be told that, 'Yea, you have the degrees but we need someone who has 1+ years doing it already'.   GAHHHHHHHHHHH!!!


*deep breath*
/Already did internships and fieldwork and it's NOT ENOUGH
//Sorry Farkers, you are my therapy this early morning
///back to Ignoring those student loan bills again

There IS the whole matter of you need to actually look for work in areas that are hiring. Just deciding at age 18-20 that you want to be (something awesome and fun) is going to get you right back working sh*t jobs once you graduate if its 1,000 to 1 shot they are hiring in your field.

Its baffling to some of us how you can get all the way through college believing they'd be hiring if the answer was a hard "no" without experience, which apparently wasn't available in college. Thats kind of WTF.

Its funny watching people just now realizing they just partied and studied for 4-6 years and will be behind their peers that just went to work in the first place. Except for the lucky few who actually get jobs in their chosen field.

Thats the other thing, you don't always get to choose a field. You are in college with a whole campus full of resources from networks and computer labs to entrepreneurial labs and libraries. You mean in 4 years time all you did was get a degree or work an internship that did not lead to being employable?

WTF. Thats on you. College hasnt been a rubber-stamp employment launch since the 1980s unless you mean in very specific fields, like Actuary or Nurse or ...


The whole story...
I didn't go to college right after high school.  I had a family crisis I had to deal with in my teens and early 20s.  So, I wasn't partying or goofying off.   Funny thing is, it has taken me 10 years to get a BA and then an MA.  So, much has changed in that time, including my job prospects.  I wanted to work for the Coroner's Office (or Medical Examiner, morgue, etc) but I did not want to major in Criminal Justice, so I chose Anthropology instead.  With this degree I could work with the dead in a variety of ways (Forensics, archaeology, anatomy).   I've participated in 2 fieldschools but those are expensive and unless you can secure funding or pay out of pocket there's not much of an opportunity there.  Internships, well I've done those too but since they were for only a few months at a time, they don't count for the necessary time length in experience.   Sad thing is, I was rejected by the L.A. Coroner's Office right out the door, even though I had this internship doing the exact job I would be applying fo, as well as having participated in Search and Recovery for them.  HR told me my degree was not accepted.  Wish my professor (who WORKS at the Coroner's Office) would have said something.   So, the Coroner's Office being ruled out, I've switched my focus to museums, community colleges, environmental firms, and  hospitals.  Each and every one of these jobs requires more experience working in them than I have.
So, here I am, making my case to you.   I've applied to other internships and I'm waiting to hear back on them.  My only other option to get experience is to volunteer, but that doesn't pay and my loans are too high to allow for that.  But, we'll see.

I know what you are going to say.  I majored in Anthro...that's my problem.  Yes, now it is.  But when I started this process a decade ago, it wasn't.

Anyway...sorry this is so long.  Again, therapy.
 
2013-03-05 12:33:37 PM
Hmm. Assuming this whole thing isn't a troll job. This is Fark right, not Reddit. Anyway....

1) Do smaller towns than LA hire people with your level experience and interest? Could be you could start out yonder and work your way back to LA, who has their pick of the best of the best. Has anyone told you what experience level is needed to work in LA as a forensic anthropologist? Have you gone out and found what it would take to get it? Your professor could have been more helpful here, but did you specifically ASK before leaving college (like, say, a year before)? Oh well no need of capt. hindsight now.

2) Volunteering. Put your loan in Forebearance, which is allowed (or used to be). If you can put off loans a year while you volunteer, maybe a win.

3) How in the hell do you get to where you're at without knowing whether your intended target is hiring your skill level. Sorry. Old guy rant. But seriously. Hope is not a strategy.

4) Widening your search, good, you did some of that, but once you widened it again I don't see the gap between where you're at and where you want to be, or a plan to get there.

If smaller towns have openings that might be the way to go. Otherwise, damn. Looks like a whole lot of work for no pay. Not sure why anyone would do that, oh yeah, you love the work. Well I'd love a pony.

// No I wouldnt. Don't post ponies.
 
2013-03-05 12:38:46 PM

labman: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Engineers and IT people who have mastered 5 different martial arts, date a supermodel and have to be in the gym in 26 minutes.

While you are clearly describing me, I don't have to be at the gym today.  That's next month.


I only had to be at the gym for the first week of January. That's when my resolutions run out of steam.
 
2013-03-05 12:49:30 PM
No one cares, nerd.
 
2013-03-05 12:59:45 PM

raerae1980: The whole story...
I didn't go to college right after high school. I had a family crisis I had to deal with in my teens and early 20s. So, I wasn't partying or goofying off. Funny thing is, it has taken me 10 years to get a BA and then an MA. So, much has changed in that time, including my job prospects. I wanted to work for the Coroner's Office (or Medical Examiner, morgue, etc) but I did not want to major in Criminal Justice, so I chose Anthropology instead. With this degree I could work with the dead in a variety of ways (Forensics, archaeology, anatomy). I've participated in 2 fieldschools but those are expensive and unless you can secure funding or pay out of pocket there's not much of an opportunity there. Internships, well I've done those too but since they were for only a few months at a time, they don't count for the necessary time length in experience. Sad thing is, I was rejected by the L.A. Coroner's Office right out the door, even though I had this internship doing the exact job I would be applying fo, as well as having participated in Search and Recovery for them. HR told me my degree was not accepted. Wish my professor (who WORKS at the Coroner's Office) would have said something. So, the Coroner's Office being ruled out, I've switched my focus to museums, community colleges, environmental firms, and hospitals. Each and every one of these jobs requires more experience working in them than I have.
So, here I am, making my case to you. I've applied to other internships and I'm waiting to hear back on them. My only other option to get experience is to volunteer, but that doesn't pay and my loans are too high to allow for that. But, we'll see.

I know what you are going to say. I majored in Anthro...that's my problem. Yes, now it is. But when I started this process a decade ago, it wasn't.

Anyway...sorry this is so long. Again, therapy.


For what it's worth, I found myself unemployed in Southern California back in 2002 after the dot-com bubble burst. After several months of fruitless job searching (the closest I came to an offer was a position that would have been nearly a 50% pay cut), I started looking elsewhere and wound up in Florida, with a job that was only about a 15% pay cut.

I don't know a damn thing about the anthropology job market, but I do know that you have to be willing to go where the work is. That increases your odds significantly.

Good luck.
 
2013-03-05 01:03:13 PM

Generation_D: Hmm. Assuming this whole thing isn't a troll job. This is Fark right, not Reddit. Anyway....


I've already thought over, maybe overanalyzed, my situation.  Thanks for taking the time
to respond, though.  My professor was very unhelpful, unprofessional and I would not participate in that graduate program again nor recommend it.  You are correct, she should have been more forthcoming.  That in itself is a long story.  Not for Fark either.

All those places I mentioned do not seem to EVER have entry-level work.  The museum I'm at won't even hire me from within or allow me to move up.  I have to have the proper degrees/experience for that type of work (curatorial, exhibits, registrar).   I've been networking, schmoozing, etc with the Higher Powers That Be but they tell me times have changed and that isn't enough.

Anyway, in the end my roadblock is practical experience.  What I have, what I thought would be enough for entry-level into a variety of places that people with my degrees work at, is not enough.    So I remain hopeful those internships will turn out.
 
2013-03-05 04:02:23 PM
Won't it be fun when the word gets out that if you want a job, you pretty much have to get a STEM degree? We act smug now. Just wait until everyone switches and 500,000 new STEMs hit the job market every year, desperate for work, willing to do what you do for $35k/year.
 
2013-03-05 05:51:09 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: If you can pass Calculus 5 than you earned at least 50k a year.

probably don't know the difference between "than" and "then".

/sorry
 
2013-03-05 09:12:37 PM

FTDA: Too bad having a degree in this job market is about as useful as teats on a boar hog if you don't have any experience to back it up.


Unless you're going through a university hire program. My company has one, and they use it. A lot.

Thoguh: There is no correlation between the salary increase they show for 2011 to 2012 and the "percent change" they list.  Am I missing something there?


Besides rounding errors? Here are two I grabbed at random.


13. Accounting
Average starting pay in 2012: $52,900
Average starting pay in 2011: $50,800
Percent change: 4.1


50800 x 1.041 = 52822

1. Computer engineering**
Average starting pay in 2012: $70,400
Average starting pay in 2011: $67,800
Percent change: 3.8


67800 x 1.038 = 70376
 
2013-03-05 09:33:28 PM

Tommy Moo: Won't it be fun when the word gets out that if you want a job, you pretty much have to get a STEM degree? We act smug now. Just wait until everyone switches and 500,000 new STEMs hit the job market every year, desperate for work, willing to do what you do for $35k/year.


Well, if you believe http://www.code.org/ , we already have a "shortage".
 
2013-03-05 09:46:23 PM
Also, you always have to ask where the jobs are and adjust for COL.

$70K starting in the midwest or South is about $50K after taxes, where the rent on a nice 1 BR is under $1000/month.

$70K in the Bay Area is $48K after taxes, where the rent on a nice 1 BR (in the city) is $2,000 - $2,500/month.  (And then in the burbs, rent + car = $2,500 and up)

Big difference between those two.

/And same job pays $60K in Michigan and $70K in SF, which just about pays for the difference in state taxes.

Tommy Moo: Won't it be fun when the word gets out that if you want a job, you pretty much have to get a STEM degree? We act smug now. Just wait until everyone switches and 500,000 new STEMs hit the job market every year, desperate for work, willing to do what you do for $35k/year.


The word IS out.  That's why the science people are all so farked right now.  Everyone got science degrees without realizing that the only jobs were $35K lab assistant positions and that there weren't a whole lot of those.

T and E people are probably all right (assuming that they're competent).  After the whole "outsource to incompetent Indians" thing (If the Indians were competent, they'd have gotten H1-B's and come over here) failed to work out, a lot of companies are looking for a smaller number of focused, competent, and qualified people instead of "While problem not fixed, throw more monkeys at problem".

Don't know enough about pure M degrees to speak either way.
 
2013-03-05 10:21:16 PM

dletter: Tommy Moo: Won't it be fun when the word gets out that if you want a job, you pretty much have to get a STEM degree? We act smug now. Just wait until everyone switches and 500,000 new STEMs hit the job market every year, desperate for work, willing to do what you do for $35k/year.

Well, if you believe http://www.code.org/ , we already have a "shortage".


Short Version: Yes, we do.

Long Version: We will always have a programmer shortage, just by the nature of computer programs.

Quoting from Joel on Software:  http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000050.html 

But with software companies, that's not the case. Customer demand is directly related to how many problems you solve, how good your product is, and how many features it has that address potential customers' needs. Adding another programmer means you have time to implement more features, optimize and debug code, make file format converters, and other things which get you more customers. So almost every software company or Internet startup I've visited has generally had a policy of "we'll hire any good technical people we can get."

Computer Programs are infinitely scaleable.  The first copy of a program costs $X.  The 2nd to infinityth copies cost nothing (or a few millionth's of a cent in bandwidth).

The more people buy the program, the more money you make.
The more people want the program, the more people will buy the program.
The more stuff you add to a program, the more people will want the program.
The more (good) programmers you have, the more stuff you can add to the program.

Eg: More programmers -> more money (with a time delay).  And if the features that programmer is adding are good, they can pay for themselves and then some.   Good design adds value faster than it adds cost, and it does so in a way that's difficult to replicate in other industries (hence why top college grad salaries are sitting at 6 figures plus significant stock right now, and a studio in SF is sitting at over $2K/month).

The place I'm at now is at 5.5 programmers (one guy is partly business and partly developer).  We have features for 20 more programmers in the backlog.  And if we had those 20 people, we could probablyuse 20 more.  There's 20 other companies in the building with us who are all in the exact same boat.  Mind you, we're not at a point where cash flow permits hiring 20 programmers (Ask again in 6-12 months), but we would if we could.  The only limitation on our ability to hire more programmers is the amount of money there is to hire programmers (since there is a bit of a time delay between hire and "Paying for self'.  It's a bit of a Ponzi scheme honestly, where this round goes to pay for next round and so on).

So by definition, there can NEVER be enough good programmers.  The entire world could consist of Stroustrup's and Carmack's and Djikstra's and there would still not be enough programmers, because there would always be more stuff for them to do.
 
2013-03-05 11:20:27 PM
Nurses make that much?
 
2013-03-06 06:11:06 AM

abhorrent1: Nurses make that much?


and engineers make that much starting pay ?
I need to go to the US of A quick!

oh wait
maybee it is like here in Germany, where I read about the " lack of engineers" in newspaper every 2 month, but the reality is lots of people with engineering degrees do other jobs - because of the pay. (like selling insurance or whatever).

The truth is: suply and demand set the price
You always need more job-seekers as you have jobs to offer, or else the price will go up.
So you tell your journalist friend to write this kind of article, so many young people will study what you need, there will be too much of them, and you don't need to pay them to much
 
2013-03-06 09:38:53 AM

On-Off: and engineers make that much starting pay ?
I need to go to the US of A quick!


Out here in the West Texas oil fields, engineers are in very high demand and the money is crazy but the Europeans (save for a few Russians) can't hang with the pace. Keep your insurance job.
 
2013-03-06 10:37:20 PM
Nursing may be #14 on the list, but jobs for nurses are so plentiful that we have to import thousands a year from other nations.  With the aging of nurses and the population of the US, nurses are projected to be in short supply over at least the next decade.

If you want job security, go nursing.  There are lots of ways to be a nurse without having to wipe butts either.
 
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