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(NYPost)   Hello, my name is Jason and I'll be your server tonight. Our special is the whiniest article about waiters you'll read this year. It's served over a bed of snobbery with a NYPost glaze. And just so you know, there is a tipping wank surcharge   (nypost.com) divider line 245
    More: Dumbass, party service  
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16833 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2013 at 7:56 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-04 11:59:36 PM  

Z-clipped: Restaurants don't work the way you want them to. Service is not included in the menu price in the US. You're expected, (yes, expected,by everyone involved in the transaction) to tip 15-20% for adequate-excellent service. That's what eating out entails in this society. Get the fark over it.


I did get over it. Then I left a buck. Take it up with your employer.
 
2013-03-05 12:04:27 AM  

Yogimus: Z-clipped: Restaurants don't work the way you want them to. Service is not included in the menu price in the US. You're expected, (yes, expected,by everyone involved in the transaction) to tip 15-20% for adequate-excellent service. That's what eating out entails in this society. Get the fark over it.

I did get over it. Then I left a buck. Take it up with your employer.


You say you did, but we both know you're lying.
 
2013-03-05 12:05:25 AM  

untaken_name: farkin_noob: I hate when people say get a real job. I had a 9-5 job and I hated it.

You think a 9-5 job is what is meant by 'a real job'? Wow....you have low standards. We should go out.

/only kidding
//I said *low*, not *no*


I worked at small insurance agency. We had better than bankers hours. It was the only perk of the job.

/what are these standards you speak of?
 
2013-03-05 12:06:37 AM  

Z-clipped: Our economy shifted from industrial to largely service-based around 40 years ago.  Since that time, there has been a nationwide push to improve service standards across the board.  It spawned an entire genre, known as "casual fine-dining", to which essentially all good restaurants now belong.   Today, the middle class has access to the kind of restaurant experience that only the wealthy used to.


When I was a kid back in the 60s/early 70s every restaurant you went into had sit down service. Even a burger joint had wait staff and you ordered from a menu. If anything people are getting less of a restaurant experience day to day then you did back then.
 
2013-03-05 12:12:54 AM  
Wow. Someone had his rantie panties on.
 
2013-03-05 12:13:48 AM  

Z-clipped: Yogimus: Z-clipped: Restaurants don't work the way you want them to. Service is not included in the menu price in the US. You're expected, (yes, expected,by everyone involved in the transaction) to tip 15-20% for adequate-excellent service. That's what eating out entails in this society. Get the fark over it.

I did get over it. Then I left a buck. Take it up with your employer.

You say you did, but we both know you're lying.


No, I realy did get over it.
 
2013-03-05 12:17:07 AM  
News flash: tips were a major part of wages 40 years ago. If you want to tip 20%, fine. But you can't make an argument that 20% a reasonable minimum for merely nominal service. If you take my order, get it right, and are polite, you have merely done you job. It takes excellence to deserve more.

FWIW, I've even heard of positions in fancy/expensive restaurants where there was not wage at all it was a concession. Maybe in some cases they even paid for the opportunity to provide service.
 
2013-03-05 12:20:47 AM  
So what's it called when you consistently find yourself more amused by the comments than by the story?  Time for total fark?
 
2013-03-05 12:21:26 AM  

Mikey1969: Iplaybass: I'm glad tipping is not customary here. Staff get paid a reasonable wage, so despite their suggestions that we should tip, the vast majority of us don't. Those that do might leave 2 or 3 bucks, tops.

I think the whole idea of tipping is a bit strange. You have an employer. I give them money when I purchase food/services. Let them pay you. I shouldn't have to!

I still tip when I'm in a country where it's customary.

Not only do the restaurants pay absolute shiat, they lobby and fight to continue paying that wage every time minimum wage goes up. It was $2.11/hr in '90 when I started waiting tables, and the people have gotten a 2 cent raise in 22 years.


Somehow that doesn't surprise me. Average waiter/waitress wages here are anywhere from $10-$20 an hour. Good places pay a bit more. That's why we don't tip.
 
2013-03-05 12:21:51 AM  

ReapTheChaos: Z-clipped: Our economy shifted from industrial to largely service-based around 40 years ago.  Since that time, there has been a nationwide push to improve service standards across the board.  It spawned an entire genre, known as "casual fine-dining", to which essentially all good restaurants now belong.   Today, the middle class has access to the kind of restaurant experience that only the wealthy used to.

When I was a kid back in the 60s/early 70s every restaurant you went into had sit down service. Even a burger joint had wait staff and you ordered from a menu. If anything people are getting less of a restaurant experience day to day then you did back then.


I'm referring to high end service. Cheaper sit-down restaurants are much less common these days, because they've been squeezed out by fast food and counter service. The industry overall has embraced the concept of restaurant as an overall experience, rather than just food prep and delivery. That means weeks of training and testing on a variety of subjects for each trainee, and that's assuming they're coming in with enough experience to understand service mechanics and already know how to talk to people at the table. That training costs money.

Basically, if you're talking about eating somewhere where the menu tells you everything you need to know about the food, then we're talking about completely different things.
 
2013-03-05 12:23:45 AM  

Gyrfalcon: And if you can't drive off an overeager waiter with a polite but icy "We're fine. Thank you." then you weren't raised up right, and you need some lessons from a Southern grandmother. You're not obliged to be best friends with Jason the Waitperson, but you don't have to be a dick about it either. And you for sure don't have to be a pretentious douchebag in your blog. Eat your food and then don't go back to that restaurant anymore. Why do people have to make such a tempest in a teapot about it?


That's the thing, you don't have to be even be icy. You can simply be charming and disarming. Some folks expect the obsequious server, and depending on the joint, it is often encouraged. Our Dear Author? He expects mind reading and apparently a mental rolodex of his entire career to be emblazoned in the minds of every server on the planet. He's just got that whiff of dickishness that pervades a lot of the folks who, sadly, are put in the position of writing about an industry that they neither like nor respect, but want folks to understand their DEEP knowledge of. Which is even sadder. Write about what you love, kids. Write about what you love and want to champion for.
 
2013-03-05 12:37:18 AM  

Z-clipped: ReapTheChaos: Z-clipped: Our economy shifted from industrial to largely service-based around 40 years ago.  Since that time, there has been a nationwide push to improve service standards across the board.  It spawned an entire genre, known as "casual fine-dining", to which essentially all good restaurants now belong.   Today, the middle class has access to the kind of restaurant experience that only the wealthy used to.

When I was a kid back in the 60s/early 70s every restaurant you went into had sit down service. Even a burger joint had wait staff and you ordered from a menu. If anything people are getting less of a restaurant experience day to day then you did back then.

I'm referring to high end service. Cheaper sit-down restaurants are much less common these days, because they've been squeezed out by fast food and counter service. The industry overall has embraced the concept of restaurant as an overall experience, rather than just food prep and delivery. That means weeks of training and testing on a variety of subjects for each trainee, and that's assuming they're coming in with enough experience to understand service mechanics and already know how to talk to people at the table. That training costs money.

Basically, if you're talking about eating somewhere where the menu tells you everything you need to know about the food, then we're talking about completely different things.


Higher end service means educating your waitstaff. More than just what an aioli is, but also wine service, knowledge about said wines, featured wines and beer, knowledge about liquor, which often means a sommelier on hand to educate the staff and make good choices for the place.

You want an educated waitstaff no matter what. Differences in sauces, what stocks are used, what cuts of meat, where they come from, and to head off odd questions, like folks who have food allergies and what to steer clear of, and how food is prepared in the kitchen. You are allergic to seafood, you might want to make sure the kitchen fries proteins in a different fryer than the starches.

Good waitstaff make all the difference. Not just for the guest but for the kitchen as well. Good waitstaff are essential for running a joint well.
 
2013-03-05 12:38:17 AM  

ZAZ: I've heard "waitrons" around Boston, but not often.

I don't even need to know your name

If she's cute I'll try to remember her name, but I've never followed up.

Once I got a message on my answering machine from a waitress asking for a date and reminding me that we had met at her restaurant a few days ago. Except I never ate at her restaurant or met her. I never knew if she was the victim of a typo or a fake number.


Ask your "friends."
 
2013-03-05 12:38:33 AM  

Mikey1969: NobleHam: I have to agree. I don't want my waiter to have personality unless I ask him a question involving his or her opinion of a dish. A really good waiter should be almost unnoticeable, but accessible when needed.

Because at $2.13/hr they have time to be there just for you.


I tip well, minimum wage for waiters is a good bit higher than that in my state, and what part of "almost unnoticeable but accessible when needed" did you interpret as constantly at my elbow? I don't want them bothering me much, but they shouldn't avoid eye contact when they walk by, they should walk by every five minutes or so without being intrusive, etc.

doglover: Mikey1969: NobleHam: I have to agree. I don't want my waiter to have personality unless I ask him a question involving his or her opinion of a dish. A really good waiter should be almost unnoticeable, but accessible when needed.

Because at $2.13/hr they have time to be there just for you.

Yeah, I'm against that. You want tips? farkin' impress me. Being an average waiter? That's not impressive. Juggle knives and a tomato bing bam boom a tomato salad lands on my plate? That's $20 right there.


If I wanted dinner theater I'd pay for dinner theater.
 
2013-03-05 12:48:44 AM  

MayoBoy: Serious question:  At a white linen tablecloth restaurant with a party of 13.  While waiting for our deserts, a waitress other than ours comes up to me and asks if she can buy me a drink at the bar.  Am I supposed to know that is a special code for "I want to talk to you in private and tell you to hurry up because we have lots of people waiting in the bar for tables"?

We hadn't even gotten our check yet, much less our desert.  Am I right to be pissed off about it?


mindjunks.com
 
2013-03-05 12:55:21 AM  
Could only get thru the first few paragrapghs or so. Maybe there's more to the article, but by then it didn't matter.
From what I took away was this.
Then move to frickin France and STFU!!!
 
2013-03-05 01:07:37 AM  

gregscott: News flash: tips were a major part of wages 40 years ago. If you want to tip 20%, fine. But you can't make an argument that 20% a reasonable minimum for merely nominal service. If you take my order, get it right, and are polite, you have merely done you job. It takes excellence to deserve more.

FWIW, I've even heard of positions in fancy/expensive restaurants where there was not wage at all it was a concession. Maybe in some cases they even paid for the opportunity to provide service.


Those would be strip clubs.
 
2013-03-05 01:07:45 AM  

Mikey1969: Iplaybass: I'm glad tipping is not customary here. Staff get paid a reasonable wage, so despite their suggestions that we should tip, the vast majority of us don't. Those that do might leave 2 or 3 bucks, tops.

I think the whole idea of tipping is a bit strange. You have an employer. I give them money when I purchase food/services. Let them pay you. I shouldn't have to!

I still tip when I'm in a country where it's customary.

Not only do the restaurants pay absolute shiat, they lobby and fight to continue paying that wage every time minimum wage goes up. It was $2.11/hr in '90 when I started waiting tables, and the people have gotten a 2 cent raise in 22 years.


I'm glad to see servers aware of this. I tip and tip well, because taking these issues out on out waitstaff is ridiculous, but there is a legitimate concern in this country (and not only in food service, the percentage of Wal-Mart workers on welfare is a further indication) with big companies gleefully getting their customers, who already pay for their products, to further subsidize the fact that they refuse to pay livable wages. Where it gets the most frustrating is when servers seek to characterize it as a two-way battle - between themselves, working for substandard wages in admittedly tough conditions, and penny-pinching customers who are cheap if twenty percent isn't their low standard for average or even below-average service. While Darden and it's ilk sit back and do the "eeeexxxxceelllent" Mr. Burns thing with their hands.
 
2013-03-05 01:10:00 AM  

ZAZ: I've heard "waitrons" around Boston, but not often.

I don't even need to know your name

If she's cute I'll try to remember her name, but I've never followed up.

Once I got a message on my answering machine from a waitress asking for a date and reminding me that we had met at her restaurant a few days ago. Except I never ate at her restaurant or met her. I never knew if she was the victim of a typo or a fake number.


I hope you followed through.  I've had excellent luck with wrong numbers.
 
2013-03-05 01:10:44 AM  

Martstar: You know, not being a dick should apply to every facet of life as much as possible.  You're no better than the person whose job it is to provide service to you, no matter what your inflated sense of yourself might tell you to the contrary.  Your waiter, your mechanic, the kid who bags your groceries, etc., all have names and families and stuff going on in their lives.  We all think we're kings and queens in America, but the fact is, we rent our servants, and we share our servants, and, come to think of it, they're servers, not servants.  They're people, doing a job, usually a kinda shiatty one, so just quick being a dick.  All of you, but especially you, Kyle.  You are better than no one.  Would you like a nice big slice of humble pie for desert?  It's on the house.


Well put....you are a decent human, we could use more like you on this crazy floating rock.
 
2013-03-05 01:25:45 AM  
Well, if you get skills, you can get paid as skilled labor. Till then, you will only get paid as much as it will cost to replace you with someone better. No one owes you a "living wage".
 
2013-03-05 01:29:36 AM  

hubiestubert: Higher end service means educating your waitstaff. More than just what an aioli is, but also wine service, knowledge about said wines, featured wines and beer, knowledge about liquor, which often means a sommelier on hand to educate the staff and make good choices for the place.

You want an educated waitstaff no matter what. Differences in sauces, what stocks are used, what cuts of meat, where they come from, and to head off odd questions, like folks who have food allergies and what to steer clear of, and how food is prepared in the kitchen. You are allergic to seafood, you might want to make sure the kitchen fries proteins in a different fryer than the starches.

Good waitstaff make all the difference. Not just for the guest but for the kitchen as well. Good waitstaff are essential for running a joint well.


100% true.  And as usual, I tip my hat to you for being a chef and acknowledging this, because many don't.

Also, with farm-to-table and techno-emotional recently dominating the elite market, the range and depth of knowledge a good server has to have is enormous.  To understand a chef's concept, you're looking at working knowledge of every kitchen technique from haute cuisine forward, plus either the physics behind substances like isomalt, and techniques like spherification, or what can sometimes be a staggering amount of sourcing information, coupled with an ever-growing array of in-house processes like butchering, curing, drying, baking...

Most people have no idea how much informal education good servers actually have once they're been in the business for a few years.  Not that I would, but I could have probably lectured off the cuff for three straight hours (literally) about the last farm-to-table menu I worked with, without even getting into wine or cocktails.
 
2013-03-05 01:36:39 AM  

Yogimus: Well, if you get skills, you can get paid as skilled labor.


I know, right?  WTF is up with software engineers?  I've watched them work...  All they do is sit on their asses all day typing little numbers and letters into a computer.  How hard is that?  Jeez, if you want to make money, learn a real skill.
 
2013-03-05 01:37:31 AM  

Martstar: You know, not being a dick should apply to every facet of life as much as possible.  You're no better than the person whose job it is to provide service to you, no matter what your inflated sense of yourself might tell you to the contrary.  Your waiter, your mechanic, the kid who bags your groceries, etc., all have names and families and stuff going on in their lives.  We all think we're kings and queens in America, but the fact is, we rent our servants, and we share our servants, and, come to think of it, they're servers, not servants.  They're people, doing a job, usually a kinda shiatty one, so just quick being a dick.  All of you, but especially you, Kyle.  You are better than no one.  Would you like a nice big slice of humble pie for desert?  It's on the house.



Yah, no matter how powerful,rich, or famous you are there will always be a time when you can be caught sitting on the can, mid turd, vulnerable, helpless and ashamed. We're all equal.
 
2013-03-05 01:44:45 AM  
Fark may not be the best place to seek an education on this, but I can't for the life of me seem to sort out the conflicting things I hear on the employer's obligation to make up the difference between what a waiter pulls in with tips and the minimum wage. I think it's an FLSA obligation, but it may be up to states how they administer it, and therefore what loopholes they provide employers. But if it's true, and actually plays out that way in reality, doesn't that more or less eliminate a lot of what servers gripe about? Or at least put them squarely in line with other people working difficult jobs for minimum wage?

/my guess is that it doesn't actually play out that way in reality.
//new here, so maybe this has been hashed out ad nauseam; if so, apologies.
 
2013-03-05 01:47:30 AM  
Food snob detector alarm has sounded.
 
2013-03-05 01:55:37 AM  
FTA: "You're a servant. So serve."

coont.
 
2013-03-05 02:00:42 AM  

crabsno termites: Food snob detector alarm has sounded.


I pick food up and put it down.
 
2013-03-05 02:01:21 AM  

Ranger Rover: Fark may not be the best place to seek an education on this, but I can't for the life of me seem to sort out the conflicting things I hear on the employer's obligation to make up the difference between what a waiter pulls in with tips and the minimum wage. I think it's an FLSA obligation, but it may be up to states how they administer it, and therefore what loopholes they provide employers. But if it's true, and actually plays out that way in reality, doesn't that more or less eliminate a lot of what servers gripe about? Or at least put them squarely in line with other people working difficult jobs for minimum wage?

/my guess is that it doesn't actually play out that way in reality.
//new here, so maybe this has been hashed out ad nauseam; if so, apologies.


Unless you're talking about small-town diners, or holes in the wall where business is REALLY slow and prices are REALLY cheap, NO server is really making less than minimum wage.  And in the instances where someone is hard-up enough to work at a place where it might happen, they're going to be advised not to seek compensation from their employer or face being fired for something "totally unrelated".

This is a red herring argument, regardless.   Waiting tables is not, and should not be, a minimum wage job because people don't want to be waited on by the kind of people who would work for minimum wage.  People don't get into restaurant because they "have no other choice"... they get into it because it's a job where, for a few concessions (like health insurance, and job security) one can make quite a bit of money in a short time, with a flexible schedule.  (Or in my case a whole freaking lot of money over many years, if you have the stamina for it.)

As one small example, if you have a severe food allergy, your waiter pretty much has the power of life and death over you.  Given this, do you really think it's wise to populate restaurants with your average minimum wage employee who won't give half a fark if you die of anaphylaxis, because hey... they can make the same money at McDonalds?
 
2013-03-05 02:02:14 AM  

lolpix: FTA: "You're a servant. So serve."

coont.


Aside from the implication that "servants" are less worth of respect than patrons, why do you disagree with this?
 
2013-03-05 02:08:33 AM  
I'm sure this guy doesn't know that many of the French restaurants (at least in Paris) are infested by rats and other critters. Heard it from the husband...he knows from personal experience.
 
2013-03-05 02:13:44 AM  
"worthy".  Mea culpa
 
2013-03-05 02:17:02 AM  

crabsno termites: lolpix: FTA: "You're a servant. So serve."

coont.

Aside from the implication that "servants" are less worth of respect than patrons, why do you disagree with this?


Do I need more than that? How people treat other people is the principle rule by which I measure their character.
 
2013-03-05 02:24:51 AM  

Ranger Rover: Or at least put them squarely in line with other people working difficult jobs for minimum wage?


Yes, it does.  Servers without tips would get the same as the kid behind the counter at McDonald's.  Whether that is fair compensation for the workload is another discussion entirely.
 
2013-03-05 02:26:10 AM  
Ranger Rover:

By the way, if you don't believe me, look at the numbers:

A waiter needs to make less than $5.12/hr to come in under minimum wage.   At a(n abysmal) tip average of 10%, they would have to sell less than $51.20/hr in net sales.  So in an 8 hour shift, the owner would be looking at about $400 in net sales.  At a VERYhigh net profit margin of 10% (most restaurants operate at 1-2%, but it can vary) that puts about $40 a day in the owner's pocket.  Nobody is going to be foolish enough to run a restaurant for $5/hour.
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2013-03-05 02:30:20 AM  
I'm glad I don't live in this person's world.
 
2013-03-05 02:31:27 AM  
I have to admit, that while I'm NEVER mean to my wait staff (dont like the idea of eating a lot of spit), and ALWAYS say "thank you very much" when they bring my drinks, food, etc....I WILL leave a tip that accurately rnissan98eflects the service I get.

I regularly patronize restaurants where you can drop $350 on a 5 course dinner for two.  Of course, at THOSE places, you have a waiter that is like your very own personal assistant....he/she is there for you and your table ONLY.

However, when I visit the typical $75-$150 check for dinner for two, that's when i start to sometimes get annoyed with the wait staff.

If I'm dropping serious cash for dinner (and yeah, even $75 for dinner for two is serious cash in my book), I better not wait 15 minutes for my date's martini or my glass of Laphroiag neat.

Works like this:  If you are exceptional, I will leave a 20-25% tip.
Average:15% (or I simply double the first number of the price of the meal....$70 check = $14 tip)
I had to flag you down even once for something, or had to bug you in any way:  10%

any less than that and I will usually have a conversation with the waiter and the END of dinner.
 
2013-03-05 02:31:56 AM  

lolpix: crabsno termites: lolpix: FTA: "You're a servant. So serve."

coont.

Aside from the implication that "servants" are less worth of respect than patrons, why do you disagree with this?

Do I need more than that? How people treat other people is the principle rule by which I measure their character.

I agree.  But the simple fact is that they are waiters/waitresses.  Their job is to serve.  Nothing more, nothing less.  I will respect that you do your job competently - you are no less deserving of that respect than I am as a patron.  I ask only that you respect me, as well.

 
2013-03-05 03:00:44 AM  

Krieghund: MayoBoy: Serious question:  At a white linen tablecloth restaurant with a party of 13.  While waiting for our deserts, a waitress other than ours comes up to me and asks if she can buy me a drink at the bar.  Am I supposed to know that is a special code for "I want to talk to you in private and tell you to hurry up because we have lots of people waiting in the bar for tables"?

We hadn't even gotten our check yet, much less our desert.  Am I right to be pissed off about it?

At any place I've ever worked that waitress would be fired.


There is no way that this was a server's idea. This has to be the owner or manager trying to make the table available. Apparently your waitress wouldn't even do it; so they got some other server to do it.
 
2013-03-05 03:01:34 AM  

Z-clipped: Ranger Rover: Fark may not be the best place to seek an education on this, but I can't for the life of me seem to sort out the conflicting things I hear on the employer's obligation to make up the difference between what a waiter pulls in with tips and the minimum wage. I think it's an FLSA obligation, but it may be up to states how they administer it, and therefore what loopholes they provide employers. But if it's true, and actually plays out that way in reality, doesn't that more or less eliminate a lot of what servers gripe about? Or at least put them squarely in line with other people working difficult jobs for minimum wage?

/my guess is that it doesn't actually play out that way in reality.
//new here, so maybe this has been hashed out ad nauseam; if so, apologies.

Unless you're talking about small-town diners, or holes in the wall where business is REALLY slow and prices are REALLY cheap, NO server is really making less than minimum wage.  And in the instances where someone is hard-up enough to work at a place where it might happen, they're going to be advised not to seek compensation from their employer or face being fired for something "totally unrelated".

This is a red herring argument, regardless.   Waiting tables is not, and should not be, a minimum wage job because people don't want to be waited on by the kind of people who would work for minimum wage.  People don't get into restaurant because they "have no other choice"... they get into it because it's a job where, for a few concessions (like health insurance, and job security) one can make quite a bit of money in a short time, with a flexible schedule.  (Or in my case a whole freaking lot of money over many years, if you have the stamina for it.)

As one small example, if you have a severe food allergy, your waiter pretty much has the power of life and death over you.  Given this, do you really think it's wise to populate restaurants with your average minimum wage employee who won't give half a far ...


Got it. Makes sense, and I only have a couple issues. First of all, I guess where my problem lies is in the determination of what should be a minimum wage job - and specifically with who it is that determines that. Everybody that works in a specific field is going to have (often legitimate) arguments for why that job is this, that, and the other. I'm not a market fundamentalist, but I do believe in the basic principles of a free market, and where this gets weird is how farked up it's become over time in this industry, with an endless cycle of legislation and lobbying making it really difficult to determine just what the free market WOULD pay a server for good service.

Second, addressing the allergy example, I'm not sure I'm comfortable with a basic hostage situation being my criteria for good tipping (which is essentially what this comes down to, if you're arguing that servers deserve more than the statutorily guaranteed minimum wage). I don't agree that understanding that someone is allergic to peanuts, so hold the peanuts, is particularly skilled work, although please don't think I'm saying that there aren't aspects of serving that totally do require talent (I have a friend that still amazes me with his ability to remember orders, without writing anything down, up to like an entire month later). But the suggestion that I should pay more to not be killed - or, the nightmare of every meek customer whose order is mangled - have my food spit in, is a little disconcerting. I couldn't imagine paying my mechanic extra to not "accidentally" cut my brakes; my computer tech to not "accidentally" give me a virus or fail to install the proper protection, etc. And I know that a retort may be that these people in my example are being paid for their work much more handsomely than servers - but what is that a reflection on? For better or for worse, our society (and the market? that's the mystery to me) have assigned different values to these positions.

As a server, what do you think? Do you have baseline standards that you adhere to no matter what, or do you fluctuate with the customer base? I think I would understand either. And, you probably make more money than I do, so if this an argument, rest assured you have the last laugh.

Also, would never mix up server and servant, and it's pretty deplorable that this idiot did.
 
2013-03-05 03:30:04 AM  
Smug, douchebag reporter thinks the French restaurant turned him down at 18:00 because they're too focussed on the 19:30 reservations.  Reality:  The cook isn't even there at 18:00.  He's still home jerking to French swinger porn.  Learn local dining customes before you travel clownshoes.  Nobody hits a restaurant at 18:00.
 
2013-03-05 04:00:35 AM  
funcorner.eu

Most of the gay waiters which is most of the waiters in the OC are from Laguna Beach which took the title as AIDS capital of California from Frisco in '89. If you're visiting Disneyland and don't want to be ingesting HIV then it would behoove you to be as nice as possible to your waiter. Don't believe any of the we don't spit in the food bullshiat in the article.
 
2013-03-05 04:01:03 AM  

Ebbelwoi: Nobody hits a restaurant at 18:00


I do

Usually get good service too

I tip two different ways, 20% if I enjoyed the service, 0% if I did not (I warn first).
I tip because I WANT to, if it is demanded of me it will ALWAYS be 0%

It is for service, that is all (if the food sucks I still tip, but I do not return)

// I still think this industry is pretty farked up, I dine in many countries, I only tip in North America
 
2013-03-05 04:17:19 AM  

OscarTamerz: [funcorner.eu image 300x300]

Most of the gay waiters which is most of the waiters in the OC are from Laguna Beach which took the title as AIDS capital of California from Frisco in '89. If you're visiting Disneyland and don't want to be ingesting HIV then it would behoove you to be as nice as possible to your waiter. Don't believe any of the we don't spit in the food bullshiat in the article.


0/10  Geeze you could at least put a little effort into it.
 
2013-03-05 04:19:49 AM  
I was talking about France.   You can go to a restaurant all you want at 18:00.  If the cook isn't there, you're still not getting food.
 
2013-03-05 04:28:48 AM  

Ebbelwoi: I was talking about France.   You can go to a restaurant all you want at 18:00.  If the cook isn't there, you're still not getting food.


I agree, if the cook is not there you will not eat.

But Ive sat in restaurants for the entire day in several french cities, your experience is obviously different.
 
2013-03-05 04:42:12 AM  

Great Janitor: I like the ability to refer to my waiter/waitress by name.  It makes building rapport between the two of us easier.


Why do you need to build rapport with someone whose function in your life is to tell someone what food you want and bring it to you when it's ready? Do you feel a need to build rapport with taxi drivers, postmen and rubbish collectors?
 
2013-03-05 04:48:12 AM  

crabsno termites: lolpix: FTA: "You're a servant. So serve."

coont.

Aside from the implication that "servants" are less worth of respect than patrons, why do you disagree with this?


Because it sounds like something Ann Romney would say?
 
2013-03-05 04:51:10 AM  

ZAZ: I've heard "waitrons" around Boston, but not often.

I don't even need to know your name

If she's cute I'll try to remember her name, but I've never followed up.

Once I got a message on my answering machine from a waitress asking for a date and reminding me that we had met at her restaurant a few days ago. Except I never ate at her restaurant or met her. I never knew if she was the victim of a typo or a fake number.


All this time and the most important question of the thread remains unanswered.

So, did you take up her offer?
 
2013-03-05 04:59:32 AM  

Gyrfalcon: crabsno termites: lolpix: FTA: "You're a servant. So serve."

coont.

Aside from the implication that "servants" are less worth of respect than patrons, why do you disagree with this?

Because it sounds like something Ann Romney would say?


Who in the fark is Ann Romney and why would I give a shiat what she says?
 
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