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(Huffington Post)   Subby has read this article three times and still doesn't know what a knotted vortex is or why it's important, but hey, 3D printer   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 20
    More: Cool, physics experiment, Herschel Space Observatory, International Space Station, Nature Physics, topology, French Guiana, Andromeda Galaxy, image feature  
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3161 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Mar 2013 at 5:52 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-04 04:14:22 PM
A currently insurmountable obstacle to a plasma-fusion generator is the inability to contain hot plasma for any significant amount of time.  If the super-hot plasma could be made to contain itself in some kind of vortex-knot, well, progress.
 
2013-03-04 05:17:29 PM
Potentially interesting subject with horrible video. We need Bill Nye to be doing these kinds of articles, not whoever this is.
 
2013-03-04 06:14:55 PM
Caution: You are approaching the periphery shield of Vortex Four
 
2013-03-04 06:30:43 PM
I keep trying to convince my gf that i need to be inside her knotted vortex
 
2013-03-04 06:53:34 PM
Yet another step closer to realizing the dream of creating a four-dimensional model of an inverted paradox.
 
2013-03-04 07:29:20 PM
subby's mom can tie vortices into knots with her tongue.
 
2013-03-04 07:40:46 PM

Sgygus: A currently insurmountable obstacle to a plasma-fusion generator is the inability to contain hot plasma for any significant amount of time.  If the super-hot plasma could be made to contain itself in some kind of vortex-knot, well, progress.


Pretty sure this was just a current inside of a fluid (water.)
 
2013-03-04 08:12:00 PM
It's alternating comments like those above that make Fark great.
 
2013-03-04 08:37:21 PM

UsikFark: Pretty sure this was just a current inside of a fluid (water.)


Yes.  But my hope is that now a vortex knot can be studied, relevant mathematics will be discovered.
 
2013-03-04 08:56:25 PM
So it's playing cat's cradle without any string.
 
2013-03-04 09:01:36 PM

recoil47: It's alternating comments like those above that make Fark great.


My cat's breath smells like catfood.
 
2013-03-04 09:18:48 PM

Sgygus: UsikFark: Pretty sure this was just a current inside of a fluid (water.)

Yes.  But my hope is that now a vortex knot can be studied, relevant mathematics will be discovered.


1.bp.blogspot.com

Have you ever seen fire in zero gravity? It's beautiful. It's like liquid it... slides all over everything. Comes up in waves.

/pic is hot
//and wrong movie
 
2013-03-04 11:04:35 PM

Bob_Laublaw: Yet another step closer to realizing the dream of creating a four-dimensional model of an inverted paradox.


I have one of those. I keep it in one of my left socks.
 
2013-03-05 01:10:22 AM
I saw Knotted Vortex at Coachella last year.
 
2013-03-05 01:50:32 AM
Fluid mechanics is one of the great areas of wide open spaces in physics. For all we know, which can seem like a lot, there's a ton we don't know. We don't even know why certain equations work as they do or how exactly they work, it's why the Navier Stokes equations are on the Millenium Prize list of great unsolved problems. And Navier Stokes is something used every day to design boat hulls, airplane wings and lots of other stuff. In principle one should be able to work out how to tie a vortex into a knot on paper and then do it in the lab, but we're actually pretty far from being able to do that currently. As for why you'd want to do it, as has been mentioned might lead to a way to sustain fusion reactions.
 
2013-03-05 02:18:43 AM
screw knotted vortexes....check this out!

3d printers...of dna!
/suck it QA!
 
2013-03-05 02:20:55 AM
The dolphin video is pretty cool.
 
2013-03-05 06:48:01 AM
According to Urban Dictionary, it requires a professionally trained contortionist and a magician.
 
2013-03-05 06:54:19 AM

WhyteRaven74: Fluid mechanics is one of the great areas of wide open spaces in physics. For all we know, which can seem like a lot, there's a ton we don't know. We don't even know why certain equations work as they do or how exactly they work, it's why the Navier Stokes equations are on the Millenium Prize list of great unsolved problems. And Navier Stokes is something used every day to design boat hulls, airplane wings and lots of other stuff. In principle one should be able to work out how to tie a vortex into a knot on paper and then do it in the lab, but we're actually pretty far from being able to do that currently. As for why you'd want to do it, as has been mentioned might lead to a way to sustain fusion reactions.


Yeah, I remember my first fluid dynamics class basically started off with "Well, we don't know exactly how this works, and no one has solved the equations, but we can model it by making some assumptions we know are fundamentally wrong (no slip boundary, for example)" Good times.
 
2013-03-05 07:22:25 AM
i157.photobucket.com
 
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