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(The Week)   Short answer: No. Slightly longer answer: Hide behind proxies   (theweek.com) divider line 144
    More: Stupid, Copyright Alert System, Napster, illegal downloading, illegal downloads, Hayden Manders, RIAA  
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8398 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Mar 2013 at 1:45 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



144 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-03-04 01:27:03 PM
What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips
 
2013-03-04 01:47:51 PM
I live in a small town with a co-op run ISP of less than 50k customers.  I'm thinking this will never happen here.
 
2013-03-04 01:51:04 PM
It'll fail like the rest of the efforts.

Keep farking that chicken, entertainment execs.
 
2013-03-04 01:51:37 PM
How many proxies?
 
2013-03-04 01:52:56 PM
so if youre not in the big 5 isps then you are just dandy.
 
2013-03-04 01:54:03 PM
Thanks to the use of other sorts of proxies I actually have enough money to just buy most of the media I want. The problem is the gap between what I want and what they make available.
 
2013-03-04 01:55:22 PM
I sure hope Comcast doesn't assume torrent + video file content = copyright infringement. Torrents are popular because they are the best way to distribute any huge file, legal or not.
 
2013-03-04 01:55:46 PM
mybfolder.org
 
2013-03-04 01:59:55 PM

wildcardjack: Thanks to the use of other sorts of proxies I actually have enough money to just buy most of the media I want. The problem is the gap between what I want and what they make available.


That and that they want us to pay a "convenience" fee that makes digital media more expensive than physical media.
 
2013-03-04 02:00:57 PM

skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips


The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3

And most standard BitTorrent clients will still show who you're connected to, and who's connected to you.
 
2013-03-04 02:01:56 PM

Marine1: It'll fail like the rest of the efforts.

Keep farking that chicken, entertainment execs.


This. By its very nature, if media can be played, it can be copied. Never going to stop it. Best thing they CAN do is to make media available online, instantly in a reasonable form for a reasonable price for people such as myself that don't mind paying for content, but absolutely demand full access to what I've bought.
 
2013-03-04 02:03:45 PM

Nexzus: skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips

The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3

And most standard BitTorrent clients will still show who you're connected to, and who's connected to you.


Bittorrent itself isn't illegal.  How will they know what I am downloading besides looking at the filename?  Rename "cool_new_song_I_don't_want_to_pay_for.mp3" to "pictures_of_lol_cats.zip", and voila!
 
2013-03-04 02:05:01 PM
"Stepped-up enforcement" didn't kill the Napster era, but Spotify and its competitors just might.

What! A change in business model that makes it easy to legally acquire digital music has led to a massive drop in piracy?It's not like people have been telling you to do that for 15 years now or anything.
 
2013-03-04 02:09:13 PM

wildcardjack: Thanks to the use of other sorts of proxies I actually have enough money to just buy most of the media I want. The problem is the gap between what I want and what they make available.


So much of this expense could just be avoided by rights owners putting their content out there in digital streaming format for people to purchase. I know I'd pay $35/mo or so to be able to stream every movie in Netflix' library.

I still don't get what this fight is about, other than there are execs who simply cannot fathom the idea of changing business models.
 
2013-03-04 02:09:54 PM

qorkfiend: "Stepped-up enforcement" didn't kill the Napster era, but Spotify and its competitors just might.

What! A change in business model that makes it easy to legally acquire digital music has led to a massive drop in piracy?It's not like people have been telling you to do that for 15 years now or anything.


I LOLd because SO MUCH THIS. I use 7Digital because they give you 0 DRMs with your musics.
 
2013-03-04 02:10:44 PM

stonicus: Nexzus: skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips

The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3

And most standard BitTorrent clients will still show who you're connected to, and who's connected to you.

Bittorrent itself isn't illegal.  How will they know what I am downloading besides looking at the filename?  Rename "cool_new_song_I_don't_want_to_pay_for.mp3" to "pictures_of_lol_cats.zip", and voila!


There's still the tracker. The tracker knows the (alleged) filename and who is currently seeding and leeching the file. Whether you rename it is irrelevant.
 
2013-03-04 02:12:26 PM
VPNs that don't keep logs are your friends.
 
2013-03-04 02:13:34 PM

stonicus: How will they know what I am downloading besides looking at the filename? Rename "cool_new_song_I_don't_want_to_pay_for.mp3" to "pictures_of_lol_cats.zip", and voila!


True, but presumably it'd be more difficult for people searching for the former to identify the latter as a source for the content they want.

As they mentioned in the videos in the article, the copyright holders would need to actually download the potentially-infringing file, verify that it's their content, and then submit the information to the ISP.

Whether or not they actually do this is a different thing entirely...
 
2013-03-04 02:15:59 PM
This actually may succeed in their goal.

Not suing grandma works in their favor for PR purposes.

I really have no idea why people are against the Six Strike rule. They wont give you six strikes at once. ISP's are in it to make money. Because of this there is an incentive not to disconnect you from your internet service as you no longer fork over the cash. How can that be abusable?
 
2013-03-04 02:16:36 PM

SurfaceTension: wildcardjack: Thanks to the use of other sorts of proxies I actually have enough money to just buy most of the media I want. The problem is the gap between what I want and what they make available.

So much of this expense could just be avoided by rights owners putting their content out there in digital streaming format for people to purchase. I know I'd pay $35/mo or so to be able to stream every movie in Netflix' library.

I still don't get what this fight is about, other than there are execs who simply cannot fathom the idea of changing business models.


The fight is about a delivery model that went obsolete trying to prove they weren't.  It's like milk men suing you for sharing a gallon of milk with your neighbors, because they only make money on the milk they deliver, then trying to convince the public it's because we're taking advantage of cows.
 
2013-03-04 02:17:35 PM

Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: VPNs that don't keep logs are your friends.


Yup.

Living in Switzerland is nice too.
 
2013-03-04 02:22:26 PM

Nexzus: stonicus: Nexzus: skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips

The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3

And most standard BitTorrent clients will still show who you're connected to, and who's connected to you.

Bittorrent itself isn't illegal.  How will they know what I am downloading besides looking at the filename?  Rename "cool_new_song_I_don't_want_to_pay_for.mp3" to "pictures_of_lol_cats.zip", and voila!

There's still the tracker. The tracker knows the (alleged) filename and who is currently seeding and leeching the file. Whether you rename it is irrelevant.


But you have plausible deniability... "I thought it was cat pictures".  Criminal intent is destroyed.
 
2013-03-04 02:23:35 PM
Didn't Skyfire break a billion dollars in revenue just this past week? Isn't it a top 10 grossing moving? Aren't movies breaking box office records every year? This whole witch hunt is empty and stupid if they are claiming it is due to pirates causing them to lose money.
 
2013-03-04 02:24:31 PM
"File sharing 'sites' "?   Bwha ha ha ha

What is a "site"?    /sigh
 
2013-03-04 02:26:47 PM

cman: This actually may succeed in their goal.

Not suing grandma works in their favor for PR purposes.

I really have no idea why people are against the Six Strike rule. They wont give you six strikes at once. ISP's are in it to make money. Because of this there is an incentive not to disconnect you from your internet service as you no longer fork over the cash. How can that be abusable?


I'm guessing you didn't read TFA.  Short version: Your ISP has no way of proving that the account holder is the infringer, nor do they have a way of differentiating a legal bit torrent download from an infringing one.  It may not be open to "abuse" per se, but it sure as hell has a lot of room for error.
 
2013-03-04 02:31:06 PM

Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: VPNs that don't keep logs are your friends.


i assume btguard is one of them.
 
2013-03-04 02:36:03 PM

stonicus: Nexzus: stonicus: Nexzus: skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips

The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3

And most standard BitTorrent clients will still show who you're connected to, and who's connected to you.

Bittorrent itself isn't illegal.  How will they know what I am downloading besides looking at the filename?  Rename "cool_new_song_I_don't_want_to_pay_for.mp3" to "pictures_of_lol_cats.zip", and voila!

There's still the tracker. The tracker knows the (alleged) filename and who is currently seeding and leeching the file. Whether you rename it is irrelevant.

But you have plausible deniability... "I thought it was cat pictures".  Criminal intent is destroyed.


Well yeah. But don't forget BitTorrent works by having hundreds of different hosts receiving and sending pieces of the file from and to hundreds of other hosts. I'm no lawyer, but I can see plausible deniability breaking down in that case.

Not to mention, *somewhere* a user is going to have to make the connection that "some_innocent_file.zip" is actually "some_infringing_file.mkv". If that connection is done offline (say a phone call), then you could probably have almost-foolproof deniability, but then the act of getting that file becomes a real hassle. Imagine hundreds of phone calls, even just saying "click on the link in my next email".

And face it, we're just talking about movies and music, not government-toppling documents. Who's really gonna do that for Skyfall.mp4?
 
2013-03-04 02:36:59 PM

Mr Guy: The fight is about a delivery model that went obsolete trying to prove they weren't. It's like milk men suing you for sharing a gallon of milk with your neighbors, because they only make money on the milk they deliver, then trying to convince the public it's because we're taking advantage of cows.


You'd think the business people would be more savvy than that, though.
 
2013-03-04 02:47:22 PM

Dinobot: Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: VPNs that don't keep logs are your friends.

i assume btguard is one of them.


You'd have to check their TOS or privacy policy. I haven't used them. I rarely use torrents.
 
2013-03-04 02:48:03 PM

SurfaceTension: Mr Guy: The fight is about a delivery model that went obsolete trying to prove they weren't. It's like milk men suing you for sharing a gallon of milk with your neighbors, because they only make money on the milk they deliver, then trying to convince the public it's because we're taking advantage of cows.

You'd think the business people would be more savvy than that, though.


I don't see why you'd think that.  The music industry only exists because as a commodity, music was hard to package and ship, for how easy to produce it is.  Once physical media hit the stores, there was a package an "experience" as a hard copy, and the music industry worked very hard to seperate your perception of the value from your perception of how difficult to produce the actual content was.  Once they managed to get the world to let them put a price tag on a set time period of sensory manipulation, they've pushed even harder to seperate the act of creation from the commercial patronage.  They work very hard to convince public that sensory manipulation is a limited commodity, just because there's some level of skill involved with knowing consistent ways to manipulate brainwaves through preventing sensory adaptation.
 
2013-03-04 02:48:31 PM
Don't know about movies, but there are multiple apps/sites that instantly convert youtube files to mp3. Way faster than any torrent or sharing site.
 
2013-03-04 02:49:36 PM
Time for some honey pots.  Remember text can also be copyrighted.
 
2013-03-04 02:50:01 PM
So can some kind, intelligent, doubtless good-looking person explain to me how I go about using a proxy to hide behind?
 
2013-03-04 02:56:22 PM
 
2013-03-04 02:58:12 PM

Suede head: So can some kind, intelligent, doubtless good-looking person explain to me how I go about using a proxy to hide behind?


Me? I like seedboxes more than VPNS.

Or the thing that dare not speak its name.
 
2013-03-04 03:04:58 PM
It's been said before and it will be said again, piracy is a customer service problem. If you make things as easy for users as it is for pirates (relatively), then they'll choose the legal route. Here's a few ideas, build a service on this and it will thrive. I guarantee the money will come in so fast that you'll be burning it because you won't have room to store it.

(1) Allow users to get everything (movies, tv, etc.) through a single service (Netflix, Hulu, or anyone else) and single household account. I have one electric company, not one for my computer and one for my fridge. If you want to split TV and movies that's about as far as I'll tolerate.

(1b) No more "exclusives" with one service or another and everything should be streamed (looking at you Netflix).

(2) Charge a reasonable amount. Right now, my Netflix account is $16-17 per month for what I feel is a nice but pretty limited selection. If they'd give me everything, I'd easily pay double and not even blink. Triple would be fine too if I really could get everything (ie, the old, weird stuff).

(3) It's OK to put streaming TV shows on delay like is done with movies, but for Farks sake, make it consistent. Whether it's 2 weeks, two months or a season after initial airing, I don't care, but I better be able to count on it.

Cable will still live on broadcasting first run TV shows and sports.
 
2013-03-04 03:11:46 PM

Spade: How many proxies?


www.allmystery.de
 
2013-03-04 03:17:55 PM

majestic: Don't know about movies, but there are multiple apps/sites that instantly convert youtube files to mp3. Way faster than any torrent or sharing site.


Jesus, that's sad.
 
2013-03-04 03:19:26 PM

stonicus: Nexzus: stonicus: Nexzus: skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips

The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3

And most standard BitTorrent clients will still show who you're connected to, and who's connected to you.

Bittorrent itself isn't illegal.  How will they know what I am downloading besides looking at the filename?  Rename "cool_new_song_I_don't_want_to_pay_for.mp3" to "pictures_of_lol_cats.zip", and voila!

There's still the tracker. The tracker knows the (alleged) filename and who is currently seeding and leeching the file. Whether you rename it is irrelevant.

But you have plausible deniability... "I thought it was cat pictures".  Criminal intent is destroyed.



Don't think this is about criminality or that you will be hounded by the policia.  It's straight up revenue.  There will be a $35 'fee' to dispute a strike or block.  Regardless of the outcome.

This is non-appealable money generation that helps the ISPs line their pockets and look 'good'.  They don't actually care, and this is not about having people charged with crimes.
 
2013-03-04 03:19:52 PM
Piracy will surely kill the music industry in much the same way that the VCR and Betamax killed the film industry.
 
Ant
2013-03-04 03:28:53 PM
Hey Showtime,

Your cable channel sucks. I don't want it. Let me buy Dexter in individual episodes.
 
2013-03-04 03:28:59 PM

ampoliros: It's been said before and it will be said again, piracy is a customer service problem. If you make things as easy for users as it is for pirates (relatively), then they'll choose the legal route. Here's a few ideas, build a service on this and it will thrive. I guarantee the money will come in so fast that you'll be burning it because you won't have room to store it.

(1) Allow users to get everything (movies, tv, etc.) through a single service (Netflix, Hulu, or anyone else) and single household account. I have one electric company, not one for my computer and one for my fridge. If you want to split TV and movies that's about as far as I'll tolerate.

(1b) No more "exclusives" with one service or another and everything should be streamed (looking at you Netflix).

(2) Charge a reasonable amount. Right now, my Netflix account is $16-17 per month for what I feel is a nice but pretty limited selection. If they'd give me everything, I'd easily pay double and not even blink. Triple would be fine too if I really could get everything (ie, the old, weird stuff).

(3) It's OK to put streaming TV shows on delay like is done with movies, but for Farks sake, make it consistent. Whether it's 2 weeks, two months or a season after initial airing, I don't care, but I better be able to count on it.

Cable will still live on broadcasting first run TV shows and sports.


You left out any part where the RIAA makes money.
 
2013-03-04 03:32:50 PM

swahnhennessy: majestic: Don't know about movies, but there are multiple apps/sites that instantly convert youtube files to mp3. Way faster than any torrent or sharing site.

Jesus, that's sad.


Why?
 
2013-03-04 03:32:53 PM

Ant: Hey Showtime,

Your cable channel sucks. I don't want it. Let me buy Dexter in individual episodes.


iTunes? Amazon Instant Video?

I believe Showtime sells their shows individually on those services.
 
Ant
2013-03-04 03:36:08 PM

cman: Ant: Hey Showtime,

Your cable channel sucks. I don't want it. Let me buy Dexter in individual episodes.

iTunes? Amazon Instant Video?

I believe Showtime sells their shows individually on those services.


Do they really? Even the current season?
 
2013-03-04 03:37:17 PM
The first "strike" is a simple notice that you have been observed pirating content, probably through a pop-up window on your computer screen.


This is already beyond their technical capabilities.
 
2013-03-04 03:39:54 PM

Ant: Hey Showtime,

Your cable channel sucks. I don't want it. Let me buy Dexter in individual episodes.


Hey Ant,

Buy the DVD.
 
2013-03-04 03:39:55 PM

Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: Dinobot: Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: VPNs that don't keep logs are your friends.

i assume btguard is one of them.

You'd have to check their TOS or privacy policy. I haven't used them. I rarely use torrents.


According to their site their don't keep logs.
Privacy Policy
TOS
Mind you in their TOS they say you aren't supposed to engage in illegal activity which I would have thought meant torrenting copyrighted material, yet it advertises as a torrent privacy site, so I don't know.
 
2013-03-04 03:43:51 PM

Nexzus: skantea: What about using Https?  The 'S' being the operative letter.

/looking forward to some juicy tips

The 'S' will just encrypt the actual content. Your ISP still knows that you downloaded from the address https://www.beemp3.com/somesong.mp3


Um, no. I'm afraid you just flunked web 101.

Your ISP (and everyone in between) knows that you made a request to beemp3.com, but the HTTPS request itself is encrypted. This is trivial to verify, by the way. Just pull up Wireshark and see for yourself.
 
2013-03-04 03:44:35 PM

Ant: cman: Ant: Hey Showtime,

Your cable channel sucks. I don't want it. Let me buy Dexter in individual episodes.

iTunes? Amazon Instant Video?

I believe Showtime sells their shows individually on those services.

Do they really? Even the current season?


No. I do see your point in that. However, Showtime made the show. They spent a large amount of cash on doing this. Do you not believe that one should be rewarded with financial renumeration for work? Is it really too much to wait for the DVD/iTunes release?
 
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