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(Medpage Today)   ADHD may continue into adulthood. "Oh god, oh god, oh god, KITTY"   (medpagetoday.com) divider line 82
    More: Scary, ADHD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Children's Hospital Boston, MedPage Today, mental disorders, psychiatric hospitals, population study  
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4767 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2013 at 8:47 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-04 10:03:25 AM
5 votes:

Gifted Many Few: Happy Hours: You sound ADHD. (not really, but you see how it works now?)

I've been told I have Aspergers. Not from a doctor, but from people that hear how I talk. I am the guy that will complain about my food not being done right in a restaurant or telling the mailman to wipe his feet before walking on my porch. I don't have a social condition, I just tell people how it is.

I feel ADHD is the same thing. Someone isn't doing well, we have to have a medical reason, so they can't be persecuted.


You're making a blanket determination of the validity of a condition based on a few comments a few non-medically trained lay people made to you in describing your behavior.

Do you understand how stupid and illogical that is?

I'll tell you how it is - you're an ignoramus and a cretin.
2013-03-04 10:57:40 AM
4 votes:
Alright, i've explained it before and gotten people to understand...

Someone who is suffering from ADD/ADHD is not about "doing doing... KITTY!" That's a huge misconception...

This is a chemical imbalance... The brain operates normally because of a delicate balance of chemicals, throw any one of those chemicals out of whack, and bam, you have a disorder...

In the case of ADD it's about the brain chemically reacts to stimuli. A normal person when charged with a task, is able to listen, focus, and do, because chemically speaking, there isn't a problems. But with ADD, the part of the brain that stimulus response system is out of balance.

Normally, for an ADD person, there isn't enough stimulus in menial or mundane tasks for the brain to respond to... so the brain wanders, looking for more stimulating or engaging material in order so make up for that deficiency. So there's a darker side of ADD that isn't about losing focus...

The brain is deficient of that chemical, but when the brain DOES get the environmental stimulant to produce that chemical, it's like giving a heroin addict a hit... As long as that person is exposed to that stimulant, then the brain will go into overdrive in the focusing chemicals so that the response chemicals keep flowing...

This is called Hyper-Focus and a side effect of ADD... The stimulus that triggers HF can be different for each person, but one of the biggies is Video Games... video games offers visual and audio stimulus, with the option of engagement and interaction, with a lot of short term pay offs. Leveling a character, beating a board, getting a new weapon... Each small accomplishment in a video game gives that stimulus response the ADD brain craves... A person hyper-focused on a video game may play for 8 or more hours and not even realize that much time has passed. They forget to eat, forget to use the bathroom, forget chores, and other responsibilities...

Why medicine works like a "magic pill":

The reason medicines like ridalin and aderol work is because they are chemical stimulants, specifically from the amphetamine line of stimulants. Amps work on the exact part of the brain that regulates the same chemical response as environmental stimulus. So the chems work because they artificially provide a stimulus that the ADD brain lacks. The person being treated can work on a regular mundane or menial task, like listening to a teacher talk about a subject that isn't exactly stimulating without loosing focus because the pill provides the artificial stimulus the brain needs...

The drawbacks to this kind of treatment of course is addiction, and possibly desensitization to the drug

So is this a cure? No, it's a treatment... Instead of balancing the chemicals in the brain, it augments the deficiency with a boost of stimulants, creating an artificial balance dependent upon a pill rather than figuring out how to make the brain become balanced...

The equivalent would be giving person with a gunshot wound morphine to take away the pain, but not removing the bullet causing the pain to begin with...
2013-03-04 09:53:02 AM
4 votes:

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.


Sounds like my experience; I was struggling with focus in my final year of my history degree, and finally sought out a psychiatrist's opinion.  Diagnosis was ADHD, at age 26.  Not sudden onset; one of the things we reviewed was my scholastic history, and looking back, every one of my report cards going back to Kindergarten had "can't sit still" or "trouble paying attention" somewhere on it.  The signs were all there, but my dad had a government job and we moved cities every few years, and no teachers made the connection.

Thankfully, caffeine works for me, but I need to regulate it; I need about 100mg every 3-4 hours.  Too much, and I just go out the far side and get hyper and twitchy.  

FLMountainMan: Not making a great argument here for hiring people with ADHD.  I don't give a shiat if you can't "summon the willpower" to not surf Fark at work.


This is like trying to describe addiction to someone who's never been addicted.  It's not about not giving a shiat.  It's about loving the work you do, and really wanting to get on that fascinating project that needs to get done by tomorrow, and here it is, 10pm, and you've been playing Minesweeper for three hours.  Minesweeper farking sucks.  You know it sucks.  Your project is much more fun.  Hell, any of a dozen other games you've got on your PC would be more fun.  Watching TV would be more fun.  You've been trying to force yourself to do something else, but you keep getting distracted by finding another bomb.

Trying to tell an ADHD person to "just focus" is like telling an alcoholic to "just stop drinking", or someone suffering clinical depression to "just suck it up and be happy".  It only makes sense if you have no idea what they're going through.  ADHD involves chemical imbalances in the brain.  It's not that we  won't focus.  It's that we  can't focus.  Or, to be even more clear, that we can't  controlfocus.  We can't focus on what we want to, and sometimes our focus gets "stuck" on something we DON'T want it to.
2013-03-04 09:13:34 AM
4 votes:

Gifted Many Few: I still think ADHD is a myth perpetuated by a few to have a new "victim class"

A bunch of people, normally middle class whites, need to find a new reason for society to pay attention to them. It's like the middle child syndrome.


It's real. It's just over-diagnosed. It's much easier to label someone than to actually help them.

You sound ADHD. (not really, but you see how it works now?)
2013-03-04 09:06:35 AM
4 votes:
Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.
2013-03-04 02:40:33 PM
3 votes:
I may as well add myself to the list.

My name is Casey, and I have adult ADD.

If you were to look at my educational career, you would think I would be the last person you'd suspect with ADD. I was in fifth grade before I got my first B. I graduated high school with honors, 24 college credits via AP and testing out. I graduated cum laude from college, Honors from a program that mandated a year of research. Only four people in my year did that.

Then things started to get a bit off. I started fighting depression, every winter to start with, then constantly. I made it through grad school, got into med school, knocked out the first two years, and finally started seeking help. I tried, with my psych, half the antidepressants in the book.

The side effects made the depression worse. A year of progressively worsening sexual dysfunction, culminating in normal response with complete anorgasmia. Think of how frustrating that would be for you. Two weeks of crippling, can't-leave-the-apartment diarrhea on another. Feeling like a zombie on a third. All the while, the depression had me failing courses- I simply didn't care enough to leave the house. I was suicidal more than once- I never attempted it, but plan? You bet on it.

After 3 years of this, and finally just leaving my psych as we weren't seeing eye to eye anymore, my primary doc allowed me a trial of Adderall.

It was night and day. I was ME again. I wouldn't be exaggerating to say that the Adderall saved my life. I turned the entire educational experience around- failures became high passes, exams fell like cut trees. I finished my MD last June, and there was my pill container with Adderall in my pocket.

Anyone who says someone with ADD can't function can come talk to me.

- Casey, MD, MS
2013-03-04 10:03:15 AM
3 votes:
A lesser known, and counterintuitive to uninformed individuals, symptom of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is the ability to hyperfocus upon tasks.

When I was young, I began playing a session of Secret of Mana in the morning. I managed to make significant progress in the game, yet I lost all awareness of my surroundings until late at night; I had been entirely unaware of the passage of time.

Upon a second playthrough of the game, I realised that I had no memory of the in-game events from that session. I had evidently not formed long-term memories during the session, despite progressing substantially.
2013-03-04 09:34:15 AM
3 votes:

Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.


And if you smack your nearsighted kid hard enough he'll see the errors of his lazy-looking ways and see right.  Screw the glasses/contacts industry agenda.
2013-03-04 09:29:43 AM
3 votes:

Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.


From which medical school did you earn your Psychology degree?
2013-03-04 08:54:01 AM
3 votes:
Wait, so psychiatric problems don't just disappear the day we turn 18?  Or is it 21? 25? or 17 in Nevada and parts of Montana.
2013-03-04 02:21:29 PM
2 votes:

Aidan: Thirded. I still have issues where I beat myself up mentally over something. Or even the one where I go "God you're so stupid you need drugs just to be normal instead of just trying harder". That's a fun one. But I've only been taking Adderall for about six months, and I'm still readjusting. There's a dual effect; the initial hit where suddenly you're not a failure all the time, then hopefully a later one where you undo all the stupid self-hate shiat you piled on yourself over the years. Still, I'm quite optimistic!


Fourth-ed.  Being a late-40s diagnosee (thanks, son!), there are a *lot* of bad habits to unlearn.  It's not a simple transition from Clark Kent to Superman -- there are plenty of times when you are operate as "Clark Man" or "SuperKent".  But at least you know what the heck is happening, and why...
2013-03-04 02:15:31 PM
2 votes:

FizixJunkee: Here's my analogy to describe ADHD:

You know those people with OCD who can't help but constantly check that all the doors are locked, or they must wash their hands like ten thousand times a day?  Like, these repeating thoughts---"Double check the door is locked" or "I think I need to wash my hands."---distract them from their life?  That's my ADHD.  Except, instead of a single thing (e.g., doors or handwashing) keeping me distracted, it's everything.   Everything grabs your attention and there's no way to ignore it.  There's no "tuning it out" (at least for me, anyway).

ADHD is not having too little attention; it's having too much attention.


I would amend that to say that, for me, it's not having the ability to consistently direct one's attention at will.  A good metaphor is watching a TV where someone else has the remote--it might stay on the same channel for an extended period of time, but it might not be the channel you need to be on.  Even if you can wrest the remote away and get it to the nature channel, the remote soon changes hands again, and your stuck watching monster truck rallies and pro wrestling.  Medication can allow you to get a slightly better grip on the remote and keep a hold of it longer, which is enormously helpful, though not a perfect solution.

/has ADHD
//at work, commenting on Fark when I should be working
///the struggle continues
2013-03-04 01:40:12 PM
2 votes:
Here's my analogy to describe ADHD:

You know those people with OCD who can't help but constantly check that all the doors are locked, or they must wash their hands like ten thousand times a day?  Like, these repeating thoughts---"Double check the door is locked" or "I think I need to wash my hands."---distract them from their life?  That's my ADHD.  Except, instead of a single thing (e.g., doors or handwashing) keeping me distracted, it's everything.   Everything grabs your attention and there's no way to ignore it.  There's no "tuning it out" (at least for me, anyway).

ADHD is not having too little attention; it's having too much attention.
2013-03-04 01:31:27 PM
2 votes:

Brittabot: I sometimes forget a thought or a request from someone WHILE I'm writing it down.


Favorite semi-memory of this:  My first appointment with a new shrink.  Shrink meets me at the door to her large, bric-a-brac-filled office and introduces herself as we shake hands.  We walk over to the couch and chair and sit down.  Her first question to me:  "What is my name?"

i260.photobucket.com

/couldn't make it out on her diploma, and she wasn't wearing a name tag
//my usual covering/coping techniques
2013-03-04 01:28:17 PM
2 votes:
As a spouse of someone with ADHD and a parent of a child with ADHD who is also being evaluated for Aspbergers I am really sad to read some of the comments here.

ADHD has a very genetic component (something like 80% of kids with ADHD have an ADHD parent).  My wife got diagnosed soon after my kid.  She had spent 20 years of her adult life being fired from one job after another.  She's been on medication for five years and has been doing fantastic (glowing performance reviews, bonuses and raises).   It's so sad she spent most of her life trying to get along without it.  As a side note statistics say driving without your ADHD meds incurs the same increase in accident rate as drinking and driving.

Speaking your mind is not Aspbergers.  I have seen my son talk at another kid he has never met for a half hour straight nonstop about some hobby of his, even when asked to stop.  Even when the other kid is running away yelling 'stop talking to me' he will chase after him continuing to deliver his lecture.   Like many people with Aspbergers he has no friends.  Zero.
2013-03-04 12:20:26 PM
2 votes:
Hi,

My name is cchinni and I have ADHD.

As an adult with ADHD I am NOT getting a kick out of these replies...although I must admit to not having read them all.

The narrative about walking by the trash can 4 times and realizing each time that it needs to be taken out is a very good description of the problem.  I just wish you would not have finished it off the way you did.  It is not that I do not want to do it, I just completely forget that I was going to do it before I even get to the trash bags.  For this reason I keep similar items together when most "normal" people would not.  My trash bags are in their box right next to the trash can...if they are not, there is a 90% chance that the trash can is overflowing.

I wish that the "....SHINY" meme would go away...we rarely do that.  Hyper-Focus and Hyper-Unfocus are much more common.  Many people that I know think it would be great to be able to carry on multiple conversations at the same time...try it some time and see if any of those people feel that you are truly paying attention to them.

I find a few things helpful:
1. Regimentation.  I get out of bed the same time every day (even weekends).  I do the same activities every morning, regardless of what the day's tasks are.  My wife laughs about my "routines" but she has seen that if I can not find my toothpaste easily I will forget to wear deodorant.  Strange but true...and a bit embarrassing.

2. Natural stimulants (i.e. caffeine!!!):  Preferably in moderate doses spaced throughout the day.  And I avoid any type of depressants (beer, alcohol).  What helps you relax (like a glass of wine after dinner) will either trigger hyper-focus or hyper-unfocus in me OR cause me to fall asleep on the couch at 8 PM.

3. Over-Stimulation.  I find that having multiple monitors on my desk helps me to focus on tasks on a single monitor.  Not sure I can explain why, it just does. And I am all in for something that works and is not Meds.

4. The Feingold Diet is what got me through school.  Very few of my teachers knew that I had ADHD.  My parents did not make it an issue, and I have not made it a crutch.  My mom just told the teachers that I was "Allergic" to artificial flavors and colors...and in the 1980's this was very very difficult.  I could eat 2 types of cereal, 3 types of candy (and no one really likes bit-o-honey!), 1 flavor of soda (Coke, (not classic at the time, just Coca-Cola)), only 1 few brands of bread, a few flavors of ice cream (none at a "parlor").  Was it worth it?  Yes.  Do I still practice it today?  Somewhat.  I know which of these are my worst triggers and avoid them.

Something that you may not know is that one of the trigger chemicals occurs naturally in apples.  I had a glass of apple cider last month and I could not concentrate on anything for more than 30 seconds...it made my drive in to work almost impossible.

So, for those of you without ADHD that actually finished reading this..please understand what we are telling you.

We are not looking for sympathy or an excuse.  We are not asking you to treat us any different that we treat you.  We don't want it listed on our records so that we fall under ADA protection.  We definately do not want any more "....Shiny" jokes.  :(

We just want you to understand what we are doing and why we can't seem to control it.

The analogy with addiction problems was very accurate.  Alcoholics CAN quit with assistance.  They are still Alcoholics though...I CAN control my ADHD with assistance, but I still have ADHD.

Sincerely,

cchinni
2013-03-04 12:02:48 PM
2 votes:

Cerridwen: As an Adult diagnosed with both ADD and Bipolar, i'm getting a kick....

As the Mother of a 10 year old who is diagnosed ADHD and 'Unspecified Mood Disorder', I am not getting a kick...

Honestly I can understand how people can view those with ADHD as lazy or uncontrolled. If I didn't experiance it on a daily basis, I'd probably think my son was a "brat, undiciplined, ect" too. With the Bi Polar on top of it, if I'm not medicated it can get interesting. I find it interesting that people advocate non medication, for ADHD. Would anyone suggest that I not take meds for my Bipolar disorder? Or someone who was schizoprenic? I certianly functioned for a long time with my ADD (and bipolar) unmedicated. But I function so much better with the medication.

But to those who view ADD/ADHD as a 'cop out' fake disease, do you also believe things like bipolar, or schizoprenia are made up?
If not, why?  You can't 'see' those any more than you can ADD/ADHD.
In fact you can actually see the difference in a person with ADHD vs not in brain scans and they are finding that ADHD brains do not function like brains that do not have ADHD.

">http://www.adhd.org.nz/neuro1.ht ml
">http: //www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110105094117.htm
">http://article s.washingtonpost.com/2009-09-22/news/36869441_1_attentio n-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-dopamine-nora-volkow


I think the issue is that ADD symptoms can be confused with many other disorders, crappy diets with a lack of exercise, and over-stimulation. There's no blood test for mental disorders so we can only go by symptoms and other diagnostic tests which I think to the layman makes these "less real".

IMHO, if these diets completely cured (rather than simply helped, there's a big difference) someone, they probably didn't have it in the first place or a mild case of it to begin with.

It's similar to the hippie's claim that a Gluten-Free diet curing Autism. The kid probably had a GI disorder and/or a wheat allergy that caused the kid lots of pain and/or caused some cognitive side-effects.
2013-03-04 11:44:54 AM
2 votes:

Thunderpipes: Without all these made up diseases, guess who would be out of a job?

Think about it.

But this is Fark, where everyone has a poor life story, is sad depressed, fat, and has AD&D.


You have still referenced no peer reviewed scientific publications that support your initial assertion.
2013-03-04 10:47:49 AM
2 votes:

Gifted Many Few: I've been told I have Aspergers. Not from a doctor, but from people that hear how I talk. I am the guy that will complain about my food not being done right in a restaurant or telling the mailman to wipe his feet before walking on my porch. I don't have a social condition, I just tell people how it is I'm just an asshole.

2013-03-04 10:33:03 AM
2 votes:

Brittabot: Dimensio: A lesser known, and counterintuitive to uninformed individuals, symptom of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is the ability to hyperfocus upon tasks.

When I was young, I began playing a session of Secret of Mana in the morning. I managed to make significant progress in the game, yet I lost all awareness of my surroundings until late at night; I had been entirely unaware of the passage of time.

Upon a second playthrough of the game, I realised that I had no memory of the in-game events from that session. I had evidently not formed long-term memories during the session, despite progressing substantially.

The whole not forming long term memories thing is such a huge problem for people with ADD and it's something that goes a long way towards explaining why ADD can be so crippling.

I sometimes forget a thought or a request from someone WHILE I'm writing it down.

I've had huge problems with people thinking I'm lying to them or going back on a promise when the truth is, the request or conversation just never made it into my long term memory, so, to my brain, it's as if it never happened.

I used to have arguments with my husband all the time where he'd ask me to do something, I'd agree, with every intention of doing whatever it was, and then not only forget to do it, but forget ever having a discussion about it in the first place.

I have to watch my favorite TV shows at least twice because otherwise I don't retain a lot of the plot details. It's really a weird thing.

/hyperfocus can be awesome sometimes if you can manage to fixate on something constructive.


So much this.   It can be a HUGE problem at work. My boss tells me to do something, I forget and then later she will bring it up and I will draw a complete blank.  Like don't even remember the conversation.   It tends to make people think you are not paying attention, but you WERE paying attention at the time, you just lost the memory.   I will be in the middle of a conversation sometimes and someone will ask me to repete when I just said and I can not because I can not remember what I just said.     I have learned that I need to write any requests down with enough detail that I can do the task off the instructions.  It tends to annoy people though as they can't understand why I have to write everything down.
Hyperfocus can be great when doing individualized tasks, but only if you don't really need to recal the details of the task at a later date.  Quality checking documents for example.  You can hyperfocus looking for errors on a document well, but don't expect me to remember anything about the actual content of the document, even if I just looked at it minutes ago.
2013-03-04 10:23:54 AM
2 votes:
As an Adult diagnosed with both ADD and Bipolar, i'm getting a kick....

As the Mother of a 10 year old who is diagnosed ADHD and 'Unspecified Mood Disorder', I am not getting a kick...

Honestly I can understand how people can view those with ADHD as lazy or uncontrolled. If I didn't experiance it on a daily basis, I'd probably think my son was a "brat, undiciplined, ect" too. With the Bi Polar on top of it, if I'm not medicated it can get interesting. I find it interesting that people advocate non medication, for ADHD. Would anyone suggest that I not take meds for my Bipolar disorder? Or someone who was schizoprenic? I certianly functioned for a long time with my ADD (and bipolar) unmedicated. But I function so much better with the medication.

But to those who view ADD/ADHD as a 'cop out' fake disease, do you also believe things like bipolar, or schizoprenia are made up?
If not, why?  You can't 'see' those any more than you can ADD/ADHD.
In fact you can actually see the difference in a person with ADHD vs not in brain scans and they are finding that ADHD brains do not function like brains that do not have ADHD.

">http://www.adhd.org.nz/neuro1.ht ml
">http: //www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110105094117.htm
">http://article s.washingtonpost.com/2009-09-22/news/36869441_1_attentio n-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-dopamine-nora-volkow
2013-03-04 09:57:44 AM
2 votes:

Thunderpipes: That's why none of this crap existed a few decades ago. Parents straightened their kids out before they grew up sheltered and crying on the couch while the trash piled up.


The condition's been recognized for over a century.  They've just changed the name a few times as understanding of it has improved.  It's not some recent invention because kids are lazy.

Seriously, you sound like a Scientologist;  "Psychiatrists are bad and just want to control your brains!"
2013-03-04 09:56:41 AM
2 votes:

Gifted Many Few: Dimensio: You have not explained how you have determined that the psychologists who have derived the condition of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are in error.

I think they believe there is a disorder they can medicate. It's all about the money not the science. Psychologists strive to make a "perfect" human. One that can never happen. So they make up conditions and treatments. Not cures, just treatments. Cures would mean that the money train would stop at anytime. They just want people to appear normal for a price.


clearly, folks with Alzheimers are faking it, too.
2013-03-04 09:56:08 AM
2 votes:

Gifted Many Few: Happy Hours: You sound ADHD. (not really, but you see how it works now?)

I've been told I have Aspergers. Not from a doctor, but from people that hear how I talk. I am the guy that will complain about my food not being done right in a restaurant or telling the mailman to wipe his feet before walking on my porch. I don't have a social condition, I just tell people how it is.



I think in that instance, the indicating factor would be the tone and manner in which you communicate with people. There's nothing wrong with letting a waiter know that something hasn't been made as requested - it's how you speak to them and whether you understand if the method is appropriate for the situation that matters.

What appears forthright to one person can be interpreted as rudeness to another.
2013-03-04 09:53:04 AM
2 votes:

Gifted Many Few: I still think ADHD is a myth perpetuated by a few to have a new "victim class"
A bunch of people, normally middle class whites, need to find a new reason for society to pay attention to them. It's like the middle child syndrome.


Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.
Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.


I knew the "ADHD doesn't exist" derp would be strong in this thread.  Thanks for proving me right.  Please continue parading your stupidity for all of us to see.
2013-03-04 09:52:47 AM
2 votes:

FatherChaos:
I've never seen that Calvin and Hobbes.  That's seriously depressing.


Here's the antidote:

i93.photobucket.com
2013-03-04 09:41:02 AM
2 votes:

simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.


I'm such a failure, I'm a year away from getting my PhD in physics.

/STFU yourself, son.
2013-03-04 09:18:34 AM
2 votes:

simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.


It's not that we'd rather do something else. For example, you're at home.  You walk by the trash can, it's full and needs to be taken outside.  You recognize that it is full, you have absolutely no issue with the task, and see no reason not to do it. You then proceed to walk right by it still thinking you need to take it out.  4 hours later, you have spent the last 4 hours bouncing back and forth between whatever you were doing and the thought that you should take out the trash but just can't summon the willpower to actually get up and do it. Hell, you may have walked by it three or four more times that evening. That is ADHD.
2013-03-04 08:58:35 AM
2 votes:

Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).


By denying Big Pharma of its cut of sweet sweet cash, you are truly history's greatest monster.
2013-03-04 08:54:24 AM
2 votes:
Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).
2013-03-04 08:08:18 AM
2 votes:
ADHD leads to other psychiatric disorders in adulthood? That sounds really scary! I'd better finish RTFA if I can focus long enough...

...So by "psychiatric problems" we're talking largely about self medicating, anxiety, and depression? Yeah, nothing new there.
2013-03-04 03:52:05 PM
1 votes:

CeroX: Alright, i've explained it before and gotten people to understand...

Someone who is suffering from ADD/ADHD is not about "doing doing... KITTY!" That's a huge misconception...

This is a chemical imbalance... The brain operates normally because of a delicate balance of chemicals, throw any one of those chemicals out of whack, and bam, you have a disorder...

In the case of ADD it's about the brain chemically reacts to stimuli. A normal person when charged with a task, is able to listen, focus, and do, because chemically speaking, there isn't a problems. But with ADD, the part of the brain that stimulus response system is out of balance.

Normally, for an ADD person, there isn't enough stimulus in menial or mundane tasks for the brain to respond to... so the brain wanders, looking for more stimulating or engaging material in order so make up for that deficiency. So there's a darker side of ADD that isn't about losing focus...

The brain is deficient of that chemical, but when the brain DOES get the environmental stimulant to produce that chemical, it's like giving a heroin addict a hit... As long as that person is exposed to that stimulant, then the brain will go into overdrive in the focusing chemicals so that the response chemicals keep flowing...

This is called Hyper-Focus and a side effect of ADD... The stimulus that triggers HF can be different for each person, but one of the biggies is Video Games... video games offers visual and audio stimulus, with the option of engagement and interaction, with a lot of short term pay offs. Leveling a character, beating a board, getting a new weapon... Each small accomplishment in a video game gives that stimulus response the ADD brain craves... A person hyper-focused on a video game may play for 8 or more hours and not even realize that much time has passed. They forget to eat, forget to use the bathroom, forget chores, and other responsibilities...

Why medicine works like a "magic pill":

The reason medicines like ridali ...


This thread makes my life make sense. I'm not a gamer; I'm a writer. Just for fun so far although I'd love to get to the point where I am making a decent income off of it. But my "gaming" is when my brain is constantly in writing mode, which is a fancy term for daydreaming. I've pretty much constantly got several story lines going on up there in the headworld, which becomes a bit of a problem when I'm supposed to focus on other real world stuff, like traffic signals and paying bills and stuff. I can get lost in my own head for entire days. The good news is, I'm never bored. I have my own built in entertainment system. The bad news is, it gets really, really, really hard to pay attention to other less stimulating things.

/was self-medicating heavily with caffeine until the eye twitches and irregular heartbeat got a bit too bothersome
2013-03-04 03:45:12 PM
1 votes:

FizixJunkee: Nightjars: PhoenixInFlames: 

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.

It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.


You know, until this thread, I didn't know that this sort of hyperfocus (e.g., spending some incredible amount of time researching bits of trivia alluded to on Jeopardy) was unique to ADHD'ers.  I thought everyone was this way.


Honestly, I think many people have this trait to a certain extent..  But, as is the case of all "mental disorders", it really has to do with how much it interferes with your day-to-day life when trying to decide if it's a symptom of a disorder, or just a weird personality quirk.
2013-03-04 03:41:40 PM
1 votes:

Chabash: It's not that we'd rather do something else. For example, you're at home. You walk by the trash can, it's full and needs to be taken outside. You recognize that it is full, you have absolutely no issue with the task, and see no reason not to do it. You then proceed to walk right by it still thinking you need to take it out. 4 hours later, you have spent the last 4 hours bouncing back and forth between whatever you were doing and the thought that you should take out the trash but just can't summon the willpower to actually get up and do it. Hell, you may have walked by it three or four more times that evening. That is ADHD.


Wow, that is not ADHD. ADHD is not a "lack of willpower." What you've described is laziness.

ADHD is passing the trash can, thinking "ok I'm going to take it out as soon as I do this one other thing in the house that seems really important right now" and then walking into the house and promptly forgetting all about the trash can. Maybe getting to the other thing you were going to do before taking out the trash, or maybe you opened the fridge on your way in and noticed how messy it was getting so you thought you'd just throw a few things out...and then hours later there you are scrubbing with trash bags full of junk from the fridge and realize you haven't eaten in hours. Then you'll notice the trash tomorrow when you leave for work. That is ADHD.
2013-03-04 03:39:25 PM
1 votes:

namegoeshere: Brittabot:

ADHD is hard on the marriage.


My husband and I joke that Adderall has saved our marriage.  He absolutely loves me when I'm on my meds, and he can always tell when I've taken them and when I haven't.

\he loves me even when I don't take them
\\but he loves me even more when I do
\\\something something clean house
2013-03-04 03:33:18 PM
1 votes:

Brittabot: I used to have arguments with my husband all the time where he'd ask me to do something, I'd agree, with every intention of doing whatever it was, and then not only forget to do it, but forget ever having a discussion about it in the first place.


THIS THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS

ADHD is hard on the marriage. Especially the part where I am hyperfocused on something and he is right there having a conversation with me and I am not hearing any of it. I'm not deliberately ignoring. He's just not in my spectrum of attention.

Wait, what?
2013-03-04 03:27:13 PM
1 votes:

PhoenixInFlames: Nightjars: It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.

And it always starts off with a quick 'hey, what's this?'  You never know when you're going to take a trip down THAT rabbit hole....


Farking Wikipedia. It can turn looking up a new word into a multi-hour excursion though the badly edited annals of human knowledge.

On the plus side, I know tons of useless facts and have a superficial acquaintance with a very wide array of subjects. Some people seem to be impressed by that sort of thing.
2013-03-04 03:20:40 PM
1 votes:

Nightjars: It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.


And it always starts off with a quick 'hey, what's this?'  You never know when you're going to take a trip down THAT rabbit hole....
2013-03-04 02:45:09 PM
1 votes:

PhoenixInFlames: The 'hyperfocus'.  OMG I hate this.  HATE IT.  I'll lose hours to it - productive hours I could be working on something important - all because _____ looked interesting and I wanted to check it out.

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.


It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.
2013-03-04 02:31:56 PM
1 votes:

Thorak: sometimes our focus gets "stuck" on something we DON'T want it to.


The 'hyperfocus'.  OMG I hate this.  HATE IT.  I'll lose hours to it - productive hours I could be working on something important - all because _____ looked interesting and I wanted to check it out.

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.
2013-03-04 01:56:13 PM
1 votes:

Treize26: optional: ADHD strikes me as one of those illnesses that do exist, but that end up being heavily over-diagnosed. I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

I've been diagnosed with depression. Means a lot of times, I don't want to do much more than lie on my bed and vegetate. Even so, I forced myself to go to class while at school, forced myself to engage with people socially, and currently force myself to go to work (though not today, because I'm actually running a slight fever).

I'm not going to lie: doing the above doesn't make me better or happier (barring interacting socially, which does help). Often, it makes me quite miserable. But it's simply what has to be done.

Using the trash analogy, yeah I can focus myself to make a point to do it, but doing so requires significantly more effort than you'd think it should, and that can easily be superseded by other tasks that arise in the meantime, and then other tasks supersede those, and so on.  I can spend a day solid starting tasks and not finish one.

People with ADHD aren't non-functional, it just requires a significant amount of effort to go through the day doing normal everyday things.  A more appropriate comparison with depression would be like me telling you "just stop being down".  In my non-medical opinion, depression has the secondary effect of making you not want to do anything.  ADHD makes it difficult to accomplish things, which can very easily lead to being unhappy.

I can more easily raise my spirits, you can more easily force yourself to accomplish stuff.  Neither of us can just will the root problem away.


Fair enough.
2013-03-04 01:49:31 PM
1 votes:
Snakeophelia: I'm the inattentive type, with no more physical activity than any other kid, although the resultant anxiety disorders that resulting from feeling like I was always late, always forgetting something, and always inconsiderate took care of that soon enough.  It's incredible how much being ADD can warp your self-esteem, raise your anxiety level, and make you feel like you're always falling a step behind.Despite my host of organizing and coping behaviors to keep myself on track, I always felt "lazy, crazy, and stupid," despite earning a PhD, holding a good job, and having a happy marriage.


True for me as well.  Getting diagnosed and treated (with Adderall, *gasp*!) was the best thing to ever happen to me and my self-esteem.  Oh, and I no longer have panic attacks or anxiety issues, either.
2013-03-04 01:34:59 PM
1 votes:

fredklein: Gary Coleman's kidneys: Really?? seriously, if that's a good description, that describes me to a T....as with with cleaning in general...I see it, I know I have to do it but I find it almost impossible until its to a point that its embarrassing.....please tell me there's a farking pill for this...it drives me crazy and has ruined relationships in the past...I would love to not be like this.

[woldfitness.com image 300x195]

It's called "dontbelazyium". I've been taking it with moderate success.


seems like you're on the wrong medication, maybe you should try "dontbeajerkalil"
2013-03-04 12:46:46 PM
1 votes:
I'd like to say that people that deny this is an actual condition are just misinformed, but honestly, reading some of them here, it's pretty clear they're just ignorant.  Part of the reason I don't tell anyone in my personal life about my ADD diagnosis is because it's just easier to keep it to myself, and let the results speak for themselves.

I wasn't diagnosed until my late 20s, after about a decade of "dealing" with it, suffering financially due to my inability to manage money, priorities, etc.  I didn't go to college, because I just barely made it out of High school, and at the time I figured it would just lead to further debt and in the end, I'd get very little out of it.  I do not regret that decision.  I work in the IT field, entirely self-taught, but was never able to move into the more advanced areas I had wanted to go into, as it requires a good deal of study and application, something I just couldn't do.  You could give me the best textbook on a subject money could buy, I could love it, and I would read every page, but generally I'd forget what was on the first page by the time the second page came around.

Once I was diagnosed and began medication, I was able to actually read and *retain* what I was reading in one go.  In 2008, I was able to go from "support guy" to software developer in about 2 months as I was able to spend my free time reading, learning and applying knowledge almost immediately.  At this point I work at a large company analyzing databases, and creating and troubleshooting reports.  I have taught myself several programming languages, as well as several spoken languages just in the last 4 years.

I'm not precisely where I want to be yet, but at this point, where I want to be is a likelihood whereas prior to medication, I had pretty much hit my peak after high school.

When I first started my medication, I had kind of an emotional crisis as I realized that my life would have been significantly different had I had this diagnosis in my teens rather than after I had already made all the mistakes I had, but you have to move on, so I did.

My medication begins and ends, so I still feel the effects when it's worn off, or if I just don't take it on my days off, and my wife will tell you the difference is stunning.  I'll get a bowl of cereal and leave the cabinets open, forget if I turned the stove off despite always making a point to do so, forget entire conversations almost immediately, interrupt people mid conversation, and generally appear "lazy".  All of these, I am aware of but simply cannot control.  I may be able to remember to close the cabinets or have the foresight to write stuff down when given a task of some sort, but for every one of those moments, I completely drop the ball on about 15 other things.  It's just not manageable, which is why it's an illness and not a matter of being lazy.

The point being, people can talk about how you can just slap some focus into your child, and by all means, let them.  In the end, they will be regarded by their undiagnosed children as the ignorant bullies they are, and they can live with the fact that their uninformed assumptions may have seriously crippled their child's chances at a happy life.  Really, unless you've experienced it in some way, I can see how it's an unrelatable illness, but most people can think rationally and at least accept that it's a thing.  Some people feel the need to deny ADD exists, so they can then point to those diagnosed with it with a feeling of superiority about their own miserable lives.

/way too long, sorry.
2013-03-04 12:46:13 PM
1 votes:
ADHD strikes me as one of those illnesses that do exist, but that end up being heavily over-diagnosed. I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

I've been diagnosed with depression. Means a lot of times, I don't want to do much more than lie on my bed and vegetate. Even so, I forced myself to go to class while at school, forced myself to engage with people socially, and currently force myself to go to work (though not today, because I'm actually running a slight fever).

I'm not going to lie: doing the above doesn't make me better or happier (barring interacting socially, which does help). Often, it makes me quite miserable. But it's simply what has to be done.
2013-03-04 12:42:04 PM
1 votes:

Aidan: shortymac: I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well. These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.

Really? Hm!

My son's (new) psychiatrist mentioned gluten-free, but she also said reduced sugar, red dye, and ... God I forget what else. I did like her idea of giving him fish oil pills. Just gonna find small ones!

Might try out a week of gluten-free for the boy and see what it does.


It's actually a great help, however you'll have to check labels, etc because it's going to be hard for them to remember to do it. (With a kid it's easier, obviously) I'm still trying to get my hubby to give up coca-cola but that's hard.

My hubby says it helps makes his brain feel less "busy". Here's a interesting video about it as well:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79Y5pEv1NCs

I recommend going on Amazon and preemptively buying GF replacements for their favorite sauces and foods to make it an easier transition. For my hubby it's BBQ sauce and grilled cheese. The Schar (I think I spelled it right) brand of GF free breads and pasta tastes like the real thing.
On a side note, if you haven't already find a cognitive behavioral program for your son that focuses on ADD-friendly organization and study skills. My husband only had medication therapy and while it's a great help he was still suffering from the lack of organization that comes with ADD.

/I was on a GF diet for my IBS anyway so I was used to it
//EIP for recipes, etc.
2013-03-04 12:09:27 PM
1 votes:
It has carried over into adulthood for me, but I have learned to control it for the most part without the help of medication. There are still times when I don't stop myself before doing something or saying something wrong for the situation, but the distraction aspect is almost completely under control. Both my nephews have ADHD and have been on medication since they were 6. My oldest nephew is 19 and shows no signs of being able to control himself when he is off his medication and I am wondering if it is because he never had to learn how to handle it. Granted my nephews' childhood has been far better than mine was since they had no idea what ADHD was when I was growing up and treated me as a disruptive student. My treatment translated through the teacher's to the students creating an outcast persona around me that isolated me and limited my interaction with other students to being abused verbally and physically. I was treated harshly all through school despite being highly intelligent in math, science and history (notice I didn't say language? Grammar yeah working on that) mostly scoring 100% on all tests in those subjects. I often wonder if it would have been better to trade my control now for a better childhood then.
2013-03-04 11:57:15 AM
1 votes:

Gdalescrboz: I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).


Doesn't ADHD usually come with a tendency to <a href="http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/612.html">hyperfocus</ a>?  Although not necessarily on what your real priority is.  It's not, as so many people seem to think, a lack of attention.  It's a lack of ability to control the focus of your attention.
2013-03-04 11:40:01 AM
1 votes:

FizixJunkee: All this is true. I was diagnosed when I was about 33 years old. Adderall has been a godsend for me.


I'm glad I'm not the only one. To hear me talk about it, I sound like a shill for Adderall. :P

I feel like the Amish Laughing Guy, going "Ha! Ha! I can work!"

Let me tell you about my databases... :P
2013-03-04 11:35:07 AM
1 votes:

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.


All this is true.  I was diagnosed when I was about 33 years old.   Adderall has been a godsend for me.
2013-03-04 11:18:18 AM
1 votes:

George Babbitt: Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feingold_diet  <---Changed my life.

/not quackery


I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well.  These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.

I'm hoping to find a good cognitive-behavioral therapy program to enroll him in to help manage his ADD better soon.

ADD is more than medication therapy, it's diet, behavioral and organizational skills, and exercise.

/Hubby was diagnosed at 21
//Can't be his project manager 24/7 :)
2013-03-04 11:15:41 AM
1 votes:
theMightyRegeya:

Yeah, TP is a notorious troll... And i see a lot of other names to add to the list in this thread as well...
2013-03-04 11:15:34 AM
1 votes:

Thunderpipes: Dimensio: Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.

From which medical school did you earn your Psychology degree?

Medical School of Life.

Guy above said he can't bring himself to muster the will to take the trash out? That is a goddamn disease now? Come on. That's why none of this crap existed a few decades ago. Parents straightened their kids out before they grew up sheltered and crying on the couch while the trash piled up.


Excellent credentials, sir. I shall give any further comments, statements and hypotheses, put forth by you, the true level of attention they deserve.
2013-03-04 11:12:55 AM
1 votes:

orclover: theMightyRegeya: Don't worry, Thunderpipes' professors at the Medical School of Life tell him that your son is just being lazy.  Tell him to snap out of it.  He'll be fine.

People like that cant seem to stay in the room with my son for more than a few minutes.  It's why we haven't heard from my wifes parents in a year.  They just couldn't take it and the whole situation didn't fit their extremely conservative world view.  If we didn't have SS for him, we would be destroyed by his condition.  We almost were when he was a toddler before we got him on it.  So rather than accept that this is the reality that we have with him, they just go into avoidance and denial.  It's just easier.  Hell wish we could do that.


Just so we're clear, I was using your comment to express my disgust at one of Fark's resident idiots.  I have nothing but sympathy for you.  I have two healthy, fairly well-behaved kids, and if anything one of them will have anxiety issues like me...but I see other people who have kids with serious physical health problems.  A high-school friend just had a fundraiser to have a tumor removed from his daughter's heart.  I see people with severely autistic kids, know people with children with schizophrenia, and all manner of physical and mental problems.  It's because of my good fortune that I feel terrible when I see someone with real problems...and why I get genuinely angry at people who are, in all likelihood, just trolling.  I'd assume people like Thunderpipes are just trolling, if not for the number of people who believe, In Real Life, that all mental problems can be cured with a little Get Off Your Lazy Ass and some Pray To Jesus is the only other thing.

I honestly believe that, yes, some people are misdiagnosed, but I have to think that some of the diagnoses are of people who used to just be deemed lazy or crazy.
2013-03-04 11:09:20 AM
1 votes:

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.



If only there was a natural, safe substance that could help... www.bongsbay.com
2013-03-04 11:06:50 AM
1 votes:

simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.


The people that use it as an excuse are generally lying. It's more than just normal forgetfulness, I've gotten in the car to go somewhere and forgotten where I was going and had to drive back home. If a task does not go into my to do pile as soon as I think of it, it will be forgotten. You learn to live with it, but I thank my good fortune everyday for Mrs. Chemist, because living alongside me has got to be infuriating.
2013-03-04 11:06:45 AM
1 votes:
Normally, for an ADD person, there isn't enough stimulus in menial or mundane tasks for the brain to respond to... so the brain wanders, looking for more stimulating or engaging material in order so make up for that deficiency a menial and mundane life.

FTFM
2013-03-04 10:53:26 AM
1 votes:
Hell, my ADD has gotten much worse with age.  It's pretty obvious to anyone who talks to me for more than five minutes.  However I'm not currently on any medication, I can get my job done without it, but I have taken adderall for a while, and tried a couple others.   They work, I just don't like the side effects.
2013-03-04 10:43:46 AM
1 votes:

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.


You said it infinitely better than I could have.  Not diagnosed until my 40's here, and I have a lot of negative thinking to unlearn and misdiagnoses to put aside.  I'm the inattentive type, with no more physical activity than any other kid, although the resultant anxiety disorders that resulting from feeling like I was always late, always forgetting something, and always inconsiderate took care of that soon enough.  It's incredible how much being ADD can warp your self-esteem, raise your anxiety level, and make you feel like you're always falling a step behind.  Despite my host of organizing and coping behaviors to keep myself on track, I always felt "lazy, crazy, and stupid," despite earning a PhD, holding a good job, and having a happy marriage.

After my diagnosis, I copied the list of childhood ADD Inattentive Type symptoms from Wikipedia and emailed them to my mom, without explanation, just to ask what she thought.  I got my validating evidence when she replied that those symptoms were verbatim the list she'd made up about me as a kid, to try to explain to others why I was neither dumb nor rebellious, but was still driving her crazy.  It was just as though my brain was never in the same room I was.

Good luck with the medication part.  Luckily, that was the easiest part for me to fix and it immediately stopped the negative voices in my head. It also made my impulsive/impatient behaviors recede dramatically, so now it's possible for me to, say, stick to a budget, or stay on the healthy diet I need.
2013-03-04 10:22:06 AM
1 votes:

Dimensio: A lesser known, and counterintuitive to uninformed individuals, symptom of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is the ability to hyperfocus upon tasks.

When I was young, I began playing a session of Secret of Mana in the morning. I managed to make significant progress in the game, yet I lost all awareness of my surroundings until late at night; I had been entirely unaware of the passage of time.

Upon a second playthrough of the game, I realised that I had no memory of the in-game events from that session. I had evidently not formed long-term memories during the session, despite progressing substantially.


The whole not forming long term memories thing is such a huge problem for people with ADD and it's something that goes a long way towards explaining why ADD can be so crippling.

I sometimes forget a thought or a request from someone WHILE I'm writing it down.

I've had huge problems with people thinking I'm lying to them or going back on a promise when the truth is, the request or conversation just never made it into my long term memory, so, to my brain, it's as if it never happened.

I used to have arguments with my husband all the time where he'd ask me to do something, I'd agree, with every intention of doing whatever it was, and then not only forget to do it, but forget ever having a discussion about it in the first place.

I have to watch my favorite TV shows at least twice because otherwise I don't retain a lot of the plot details. It's really a weird thing.

/hyperfocus can be awesome sometimes if you can manage to fixate on something constructive.
2013-03-04 10:16:21 AM
1 votes:

theMightyRegeya: Don't worry, Thunderpipes' professors at the Medical School of Life tell him that your son is just being lazy.  Tell him to snap out of it.  He'll be fine.


People like that cant seem to stay in the room with my son for more than a few minutes.  It's why we haven't heard from my wifes parents in a year.  They just couldn't take it and the whole situation didn't fit their extremely conservative world view.  If we didn't have SS for him, we would be destroyed by his condition.  We almost were when he was a toddler before we got him on it.  So rather than accept that this is the reality that we have with him, they just go into avoidance and denial.  It's just easier.  Hell wish we could do that.
2013-03-04 10:13:03 AM
1 votes:

Gifted Many Few: Dimensio: Then you must be able to reference peer reviewed research in support of your claim, to contradict the research that backs up the defined condition of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Please do so, and explain your personal credentials in the field of psychology that have enabled you to credibly assess this research.

I like you. Calmly standing your ground and all. What I say on here is my opinion based on what happens in my life and who I associate with. But don't pull the "only qualified professionals can speak" card. As part of my current profession, I took courses in psychology and child psychology. From what I recall, there are dozens of conflicting theories regarding any one disorder. So no one has the right to say what is right or wrong with any certainly. Same goes will all religion and science. We are merely guessing our way through he universe.


So you are saying, then, that your opinion is not actually based upon any professional research, and thus it is as credible as are the claims of Mr. Kent Hovind regarding the subject of evolution.
2013-03-04 10:02:42 AM
1 votes:

orclover: Over the last decade we were told by our oldest son's psychiatrist that the big change was coming when he hit puberty and that he might stablize or normal out alot.  Well at 14-15 he did change, big....he's practically non-functional now.  What little hope that we clinged to as he grew up that he might ever be able to take care of himself or live in at least a semi-assisted facility, well that hope is out the farking window.  Now the question is will he even be manageable enough to live in a full assisted living facility.  He's 15, if he gets any worse we will actually have to put a diaper on him.

October at least he gets his primary diagnosis when he turns 16.  No more ADHD with behavioral disorder, now were on to full blown schizophrenia.   Just ADHD would be a blessing.  Course at this point just about anything would be.


Don't worry, Thunderpipes' professors at the Medical School of Life tell him that your son is just being lazy.  Tell him to snap out of it.  He'll be fine.
2013-03-04 09:59:28 AM
1 votes:

notyomama: Gifted Many Few: I still think ADHD is a myth perpetuated by a few to have a new "victim class"
A bunch of people, normally middle class whites, need to find a new reason for society to pay attention to them. It's like the middle child syndrome.

Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.
Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.

I knew the "ADHD doesn't exist" derp would be strong in this thread.  Thanks for proving me right.  Please continue parading your stupidity for all of us to see.


To provide fair consideration: few discussions of evolution have been featured on Fark lately, thus science deniers have had little outlet for presenting their uninformed beliefs as established fact.
2013-03-04 09:59:14 AM
1 votes:

fredklein: Thorak: Trying to tell an ADHD person to "just focus" is like telling an alcoholic to "just stop drinking", ...

...and yet, that IS the solution to alcoholism- to stop drinking. It is a little... cavalier... to tell some one "just" stop drinking, though- a little support can go a long way.


The cavalierness was the point; the alcoholic's issue is an external drug they're taking.  Someone with ADHD, the issue is in their brain.  They can't just stop.  That's what they need the meds for.
2013-03-04 09:54:41 AM
1 votes:
Over the last decade we were told by our oldest son's psychiatrist that the big change was coming when he hit puberty and that he might stablize or normal out alot.  Well at 14-15 he did change, big....he's practically non-functional now.  What little hope that we clinged to as he grew up that he might ever be able to take care of himself or live in at least a semi-assisted facility, well that hope is out the farking window.  Now the question is will he even be manageable enough to live in a full assisted living facility.  He's 15, if he gets any worse we will actually have to put a diaper on him.


October at least he gets his primary diagnosis when he turns 16.  No more ADHD with behavioral disorder, now were on to full blown schizophrenia.   Just ADHD would be a blessing.  Course at this point just about anything would be.
2013-03-04 09:50:45 AM
1 votes:

fredklein: Aidan: I noticed with my son that he gets super-duper serious (and depressed as all hell), and then he was kind of non-responsive emotionally. So I understand the "doped up" thing, at least in part.

[www.dosenation.com image 500x675]


www.catster.com

I've never seen that Calvin and Hobbes.  That's seriously depressing.
2013-03-04 09:50:16 AM
1 votes:

Thunderpipes: Dimensio: Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.

From which medical school did you earn your Psychology degree?

Medical School of Life.

Guy above said he can't bring himself to muster the will to take the trash out? That is a goddamn disease now? Come on. That's why none of this crap existed a few decades ago. Parents straightened their kids out before they grew up sheltered and crying on the couch while the trash piled up.


I am unable to locate any accredited institution named "Medical School of Life".

Please reference the substantial body of peer reviewed research that must exist to justify your assertion that the condition known as "Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder" is actually just "laziness". Explain how you have determined that numerous psychologists are in error.
2013-03-04 09:48:32 AM
1 votes:

Gifted Many Few: Dimensio: Your hypothesis is fascinating. Please present your credentials in the field of psychology, and describe the extensive peer reviewed research that has allowed you to credible derive your conclusion.

Psychology has little to do with it. Look at the all the drug commercials. They target middle class whites. They have trouble with depression, psoriasis, allergies, constipation, gout, arthritis and getting a boner. If you believe TV, the middle whites are falling apart.


You have not explained how you have determined that the psychologists who have derived the condition of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are in error.
2013-03-04 09:45:14 AM
1 votes:

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.


Vyvanse has been good for me... only problem is the cost... Vyvanse is twice as much as Aderol
2013-03-04 09:43:41 AM
1 votes:

Fecacacophany: Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.

And if you smack your nearsighted kid hard enough he'll see the errors of his lazy-looking ways and see right.  Screw the glasses/contacts industry agenda.


You know, I really don't understand people.  Fark tends to be full of people who make fun of people who worship magical sky wizards, yet seem to fail to understand that the brain is an organ, just like any other, and things can go wrong with it, just like any other organ.

I've spent my life avoiding taking more drugs, because when I was a teenager I had to go on antiseizure medication that really  didturn me into a zombie.  Well, hell, the condition made me a zombie, too.  But I've spent much of my 38 years living in a fog.  fark anyone who thinks it's made up, imaginary, or an excuse.  It's a disorder.  You wouldn't tell a person with cancer that they just need to straighten up and grow cells the right way, would you?
2013-03-04 09:41:07 AM
1 votes:
Great.

I was given ADHD medications when I was a kid. Does this mean I could now have to deal with harassment of some kind because it's somewhere on my medical records?
2013-03-04 09:39:28 AM
1 votes:

Raider_dad: I was on Ritalin in the mid 70's but my folks thought they would rather have me as I was than a zombie like shell of my former self, yet attentive child.

So I guess I got "lucky" with the alcoholism in adult life and that's why I work convenience store retail .  shiat comin' at me from all over , yeah bring it!.


And for the idiots who say "hey, they dope kids up with Ritalin so they just sit there", for about the millionth time,  Ritalin is an upper.

But I see some of the usual suspects have weighed in.  "Ugh, kids in school look like zombies must be drugged up on Ritalin and Prozac."  I used to work with a guy whose kid was misdiagnosed with ADHD, was prescribed Ritalin, and literally started hitting his head against a door because he couldn't stop moving.

"Oh, ADHD is just made up."  Yeah...fark you, idiots with your FOX News School of Medicine degrees.  You're right up there with Dr. Jenny McCarthy.
2013-03-04 09:35:37 AM
1 votes:

Brittabot: I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.


I've been trying various motivation sites. You know, the sort. Chore Wars types. As long as I can remember to go to the site, I can get SOME stuff done.

However, my productivity at work went from 2 hours a month to a solid 4 hours a day once I started taking something for the ADD (Laziness can't be medicated). I know people hate it, but man... When it works, it works. I'm a much happier, calmer person now. I'm not constantly hating myself.
2013-03-04 09:33:16 AM
1 votes:

Chabash: absolutely


Chabash: simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.

It's not that we'd rather do something else. For example, you're at home.  You walk by the trash can, it's full and needs to be taken outside.  You recognize that it is full, you have absolutely no issue with the task, and see no reason not to do it. You then proceed to walk right by it still thinking you need to take it out.  4 hours later, you have spent the last 4 hours bouncing back and forth between whatever you were doing and the thought that you should take out the trash but just can't summon the willpower to actually get up and do it. Hell, you may have walked by it three or four more times that evening. That is ADHD.


I'm not saying NOBODY has adult ADHD, I'm saying that the people that tell me they do, don't.
2013-03-04 09:14:47 AM
1 votes:

simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.


Your ignorance is stunning.
2013-03-04 09:13:42 AM
1 votes:
I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.
2013-03-04 09:05:47 AM
1 votes:
Every adult I've met with "ADD" ended up just being bi-polar.
2013-03-04 09:02:29 AM
1 votes:
I still think ADHD is a myth perpetuated by a few to have a new "victim class"

A bunch of people, normally middle class whites, need to find a new reason for society to pay attention to them. It's like the middle child syndrome.
2013-03-04 08:55:57 AM
1 votes:
I used Ritalin as a means of taking college classes without losing my focus at five minute intervals. Doing so substantially improved my academic performance.

I no longer use the drug now, but I do still suffer from concentration deficiency.
2013-03-04 08:53:48 AM
1 votes:
Which ADHD?  There's like three of them, and the Inattentive one was already understood to persist in adulthood.
2013-03-04 08:42:46 AM
1 votes:
Well, duh.
 
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