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(Medpage Today)   ADHD may continue into adulthood. "Oh god, oh god, oh god, KITTY"   (medpagetoday.com) divider line 203
    More: Scary, ADHD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Children's Hospital Boston, MedPage Today, mental disorders, psychiatric hospitals, population study  
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4769 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2013 at 8:47 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-04 02:06:31 PM  

FizixJunkee: Snakeophelia: I'm the inattentive type, with no more physical activity than any other kid, although the resultant anxiety disorders that resulting from feeling like I was always late, always forgetting something, and always inconsiderate took care of that soon enough.  It's incredible how much being ADD can warp your self-esteem, raise your anxiety level, and make you feel like you're always falling a step behind.Despite my host of organizing and coping behaviors to keep myself on track, I always felt "lazy, crazy, and stupid," despite earning a PhD, holding a good job, and having a happy marriage.

True for me as well.  Getting diagnosed and treated (with Adderall, *gasp*!) was the best thing to ever happen to me and my self-esteem.  Oh, and I no longer have panic attacks or anxiety issues, either.


Thirded. I still have issues where I beat myself up mentally over something. Or even the one where I go "God you're so stupid you need drugs just to be normal instead of just trying harder". That's a fun one. But I've only been taking Adderall for about six months, and I'm still readjusting. There's a dual effect; the initial hit where suddenly you're not a failure all the time, then hopefully a later one where you undo all the stupid self-hate shiat you piled on yourself over the years. Still, I'm quite optimistic!
 
2013-03-04 02:15:31 PM  

FizixJunkee: Here's my analogy to describe ADHD:

You know those people with OCD who can't help but constantly check that all the doors are locked, or they must wash their hands like ten thousand times a day?  Like, these repeating thoughts---"Double check the door is locked" or "I think I need to wash my hands."---distract them from their life?  That's my ADHD.  Except, instead of a single thing (e.g., doors or handwashing) keeping me distracted, it's everything.   Everything grabs your attention and there's no way to ignore it.  There's no "tuning it out" (at least for me, anyway).

ADHD is not having too little attention; it's having too much attention.


I would amend that to say that, for me, it's not having the ability to consistently direct one's attention at will.  A good metaphor is watching a TV where someone else has the remote--it might stay on the same channel for an extended period of time, but it might not be the channel you need to be on.  Even if you can wrest the remote away and get it to the nature channel, the remote soon changes hands again, and your stuck watching monster truck rallies and pro wrestling.  Medication can allow you to get a slightly better grip on the remote and keep a hold of it longer, which is enormously helpful, though not a perfect solution.

/has ADHD
//at work, commenting on Fark when I should be working
///the struggle continues
 
2013-03-04 02:19:35 PM  

FizixJunkee: Snakeophelia: I'm the inattentive type, with no more physical activity than any other kid, although the resultant anxiety disorders that resulting from feeling like I was always late, always forgetting something, and always inconsiderate took care of that soon enough.  It's incredible how much being ADD can warp your self-esteem, raise your anxiety level, and make you feel like you're always falling a step behind.Despite my host of organizing and coping behaviors to keep myself on track, I always felt "lazy, crazy, and stupid," despite earning a PhD, holding a good job, and having a happy marriage.


True for me as well.  Getting diagnosed and treated (with Adderall, *gasp*!) was the best thing to ever happen to me and my self-esteem.  Oh, and I no longer have panic attacks or anxiety issues, either.


I was fortunate, in that I was diagnosed when I was younger (after a battery of tests). My mom was diagnosed after I was (She was reading some of the books explaining the symptoms, how they perceive the world and issues they have, and just sort of went "Waaaiiiittttt a minute...")

It turns out the *entirety* of my mom's side of the family (save for her mom) has it, sooooo yeah.
 
2013-03-04 02:20:38 PM  
how to draw a kitty
what happens in steps 9 and 10
 
2013-03-04 02:21:29 PM  

Aidan: Thirded. I still have issues where I beat myself up mentally over something. Or even the one where I go "God you're so stupid you need drugs just to be normal instead of just trying harder". That's a fun one. But I've only been taking Adderall for about six months, and I'm still readjusting. There's a dual effect; the initial hit where suddenly you're not a failure all the time, then hopefully a later one where you undo all the stupid self-hate shiat you piled on yourself over the years. Still, I'm quite optimistic!


Fourth-ed.  Being a late-40s diagnosee (thanks, son!), there are a *lot* of bad habits to unlearn.  It's not a simple transition from Clark Kent to Superman -- there are plenty of times when you are operate as "Clark Man" or "SuperKent".  But at least you know what the heck is happening, and why...
 
2013-03-04 02:31:56 PM  

Thorak: sometimes our focus gets "stuck" on something we DON'T want it to.


The 'hyperfocus'.  OMG I hate this.  HATE IT.  I'll lose hours to it - productive hours I could be working on something important - all because _____ looked interesting and I wanted to check it out.

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.
 
2013-03-04 02:40:33 PM  
I may as well add myself to the list.

My name is Casey, and I have adult ADD.

If you were to look at my educational career, you would think I would be the last person you'd suspect with ADD. I was in fifth grade before I got my first B. I graduated high school with honors, 24 college credits via AP and testing out. I graduated cum laude from college, Honors from a program that mandated a year of research. Only four people in my year did that.

Then things started to get a bit off. I started fighting depression, every winter to start with, then constantly. I made it through grad school, got into med school, knocked out the first two years, and finally started seeking help. I tried, with my psych, half the antidepressants in the book.

The side effects made the depression worse. A year of progressively worsening sexual dysfunction, culminating in normal response with complete anorgasmia. Think of how frustrating that would be for you. Two weeks of crippling, can't-leave-the-apartment diarrhea on another. Feeling like a zombie on a third. All the while, the depression had me failing courses- I simply didn't care enough to leave the house. I was suicidal more than once- I never attempted it, but plan? You bet on it.

After 3 years of this, and finally just leaving my psych as we weren't seeing eye to eye anymore, my primary doc allowed me a trial of Adderall.

It was night and day. I was ME again. I wouldn't be exaggerating to say that the Adderall saved my life. I turned the entire educational experience around- failures became high passes, exams fell like cut trees. I finished my MD last June, and there was my pill container with Adderall in my pocket.

Anyone who says someone with ADD can't function can come talk to me.

- Casey, MD, MS
 
2013-03-04 02:45:09 PM  

PhoenixInFlames: The 'hyperfocus'.  OMG I hate this.  HATE IT.  I'll lose hours to it - productive hours I could be working on something important - all because _____ looked interesting and I wanted to check it out.

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.


It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.
 
2013-03-04 03:20:40 PM  

Nightjars: It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.


And it always starts off with a quick 'hey, what's this?'  You never know when you're going to take a trip down THAT rabbit hole....
 
2013-03-04 03:27:13 PM  

PhoenixInFlames: Nightjars: It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.

And it always starts off with a quick 'hey, what's this?'  You never know when you're going to take a trip down THAT rabbit hole....


Farking Wikipedia. It can turn looking up a new word into a multi-hour excursion though the badly edited annals of human knowledge.

On the plus side, I know tons of useless facts and have a superficial acquaintance with a very wide array of subjects. Some people seem to be impressed by that sort of thing.
 
2013-03-04 03:32:11 PM  

Bad_Seed: PhoenixInFlames: Nightjars: It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.

And it always starts off with a quick 'hey, what's this?'  You never know when you're going to take a trip down THAT rabbit hole....

Farking Wikipedia. It can turn looking up a new word into a multi-hour excursion though the badly edited annals of human knowledge.

On the plus side, I know tons of useless facts and have a superficial acquaintance with a very wide array of subjects. Some people seem to be impressed by that sort of thing.


I wonder how many Jeopardy champions have ADD?
 
2013-03-04 03:32:28 PM  

shortymac: Profedius: It has carried over into adulthood for me, but I have learned to control it for the most part without the help of medication. There are still times when I don't stop myself before doing something or saying something wrong for the situation, but the distraction aspect is almost completely under control. Both my nephews have ADHD and have been on medication since they were 6. My oldest nephew is 19 and shows no signs of being able to control himself when he is off his medication and I am wondering if it is because he never had to learn how to handle it. Granted my nephews' childhood has been far better than mine was since they had no idea what ADHD was when I was growing up and treated me as a disruptive student. My treatment translated through the teacher's to the students creating an outcast persona around me that isolated me and limited my interaction with other students to being abused verbally and physically. I was treated harshly all through school despite being highly intelligent in math, science and history (notice I didn't say language? Grammar yeah working on that) mostly scoring 100% on all tests in those subjects. I often wonder if it would have been better to trade my control now for a better childhood then.

That is the truth, it happened with my Husband. He had to go off his meds due to lack of insurance and his ADD was getting the better of him. It was a very frustrating time for him and I.

Meds aren't a cure-all.




I think I have a good idea of what that must have been like from seeing my nephew act for the few months he was off his medication. For me when I tell people I have ADHD they don't believe me or ask what am I taking for it and when I tell them nothing they think I am being dishonest. If people only knew what is going on in my head 24/7 they wouldn't have any questions. Even now typing this I am thinking about at least four other things and following two different conversations taking place in the two offices next to mine as I try to focus on what I want to say here.
 
2013-03-04 03:33:18 PM  

Brittabot: I used to have arguments with my husband all the time where he'd ask me to do something, I'd agree, with every intention of doing whatever it was, and then not only forget to do it, but forget ever having a discussion about it in the first place.


THIS THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS  THIS

ADHD is hard on the marriage. Especially the part where I am hyperfocused on something and he is right there having a conversation with me and I am not hearing any of it. I'm not deliberately ignoring. He's just not in my spectrum of attention.

Wait, what?
 
2013-03-04 03:36:27 PM  

Nightjars: PhoenixInFlames: 

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.

It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.



You know, until this thread, I didn't know that this sort of hyperfocus (e.g., spending some incredible amount of time researching bits of trivia alluded to on Jeopardy) was unique to ADHD'ers.  I thought everyone was this way.
 
2013-03-04 03:39:25 PM  

namegoeshere: Brittabot:

ADHD is hard on the marriage.


My husband and I joke that Adderall has saved our marriage.  He absolutely loves me when I'm on my meds, and he can always tell when I've taken them and when I haven't.

\he loves me even when I don't take them
\\but he loves me even more when I do
\\\something something clean house
 
2013-03-04 03:41:40 PM  

Chabash: It's not that we'd rather do something else. For example, you're at home. You walk by the trash can, it's full and needs to be taken outside. You recognize that it is full, you have absolutely no issue with the task, and see no reason not to do it. You then proceed to walk right by it still thinking you need to take it out. 4 hours later, you have spent the last 4 hours bouncing back and forth between whatever you were doing and the thought that you should take out the trash but just can't summon the willpower to actually get up and do it. Hell, you may have walked by it three or four more times that evening. That is ADHD.


Wow, that is not ADHD. ADHD is not a "lack of willpower." What you've described is laziness.

ADHD is passing the trash can, thinking "ok I'm going to take it out as soon as I do this one other thing in the house that seems really important right now" and then walking into the house and promptly forgetting all about the trash can. Maybe getting to the other thing you were going to do before taking out the trash, or maybe you opened the fridge on your way in and noticed how messy it was getting so you thought you'd just throw a few things out...and then hours later there you are scrubbing with trash bags full of junk from the fridge and realize you haven't eaten in hours. Then you'll notice the trash tomorrow when you leave for work. That is ADHD.
 
2013-03-04 03:42:50 PM  
The brain is a very delicate piece of machinery, to make an analogy. Any error or issue with most parts of it is going to have a rather amplified effect on how the person in question behaves. That there are people who think that these issues don't exist just boggles me. Is it overdiagnosed? Maybe, but I'd say most people diagnosed have it, or a similar problem. There are probably near infinite ways something or some things in the brain could go wrong, develop wrong, etc. There are fewer ways it can be absolutely normal.
 
2013-03-04 03:45:12 PM  

FizixJunkee: Nightjars: PhoenixInFlames: 

I can't even go on Jeopardy with the crap information I've absorbed during hyperfocus. Though, granted, I do retain the information learned during a 'session' of it.

It is very difficult to explain to my wife why I would cut into the time I have to do the things I truly enjoy, and instead waste time studying about the history of ***insert random topic I am not actually interested in here***.  The power of the preoccupation is just impossible to explain to somebody who hasn't experienced it.


You know, until this thread, I didn't know that this sort of hyperfocus (e.g., spending some incredible amount of time researching bits of trivia alluded to on Jeopardy) was unique to ADHD'ers.  I thought everyone was this way.


Honestly, I think many people have this trait to a certain extent..  But, as is the case of all "mental disorders", it really has to do with how much it interferes with your day-to-day life when trying to decide if it's a symptom of a disorder, or just a weird personality quirk.
 
2013-03-04 03:48:40 PM  

Nightjars: Honestly, I think many people have this trait to a certain extent.. But, as is the case of all "mental disorders", it really has to do with how much it interferes with your day-to-day life when trying to decide if it's a symptom of a disorder, or just a weird personality quirk.


Well put. My husband has the same degree of wiki-flood problems I do (I can't think what else to call it. When you have a frickin' flood of open tabs), but he's absolutely not ADHD in any way.
 
2013-03-04 03:52:05 PM  

CeroX: Alright, i've explained it before and gotten people to understand...

Someone who is suffering from ADD/ADHD is not about "doing doing... KITTY!" That's a huge misconception...

This is a chemical imbalance... The brain operates normally because of a delicate balance of chemicals, throw any one of those chemicals out of whack, and bam, you have a disorder...

In the case of ADD it's about the brain chemically reacts to stimuli. A normal person when charged with a task, is able to listen, focus, and do, because chemically speaking, there isn't a problems. But with ADD, the part of the brain that stimulus response system is out of balance.

Normally, for an ADD person, there isn't enough stimulus in menial or mundane tasks for the brain to respond to... so the brain wanders, looking for more stimulating or engaging material in order so make up for that deficiency. So there's a darker side of ADD that isn't about losing focus...

The brain is deficient of that chemical, but when the brain DOES get the environmental stimulant to produce that chemical, it's like giving a heroin addict a hit... As long as that person is exposed to that stimulant, then the brain will go into overdrive in the focusing chemicals so that the response chemicals keep flowing...

This is called Hyper-Focus and a side effect of ADD... The stimulus that triggers HF can be different for each person, but one of the biggies is Video Games... video games offers visual and audio stimulus, with the option of engagement and interaction, with a lot of short term pay offs. Leveling a character, beating a board, getting a new weapon... Each small accomplishment in a video game gives that stimulus response the ADD brain craves... A person hyper-focused on a video game may play for 8 or more hours and not even realize that much time has passed. They forget to eat, forget to use the bathroom, forget chores, and other responsibilities...

Why medicine works like a "magic pill":

The reason medicines like ridali ...


This thread makes my life make sense. I'm not a gamer; I'm a writer. Just for fun so far although I'd love to get to the point where I am making a decent income off of it. But my "gaming" is when my brain is constantly in writing mode, which is a fancy term for daydreaming. I've pretty much constantly got several story lines going on up there in the headworld, which becomes a bit of a problem when I'm supposed to focus on other real world stuff, like traffic signals and paying bills and stuff. I can get lost in my own head for entire days. The good news is, I'm never bored. I have my own built in entertainment system. The bad news is, it gets really, really, really hard to pay attention to other less stimulating things.

/was self-medicating heavily with caffeine until the eye twitches and irregular heartbeat got a bit too bothersome
 
2013-03-04 04:03:12 PM  

optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.


Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...
 
2013-03-04 04:08:30 PM  

namegoeshere: This thread makes my life make sense. I'm not a gamer; I'm a writer. Just for fun so far although I'd love to get to the point where I am making a decent income off of it. But my "gaming" is when my brain is constantly in writing mode, which is a fancy term for daydreaming. I've pretty much constantly got several story lines going on up there in the headworld, which becomes a bit of a problem when I'm supposed to focus on other real world stuff, like traffic signals and paying bills and stuff. I can get lost in my own head for entire days. The good news is, I'm never bored. I have my own built in entertainment system. The bad news is, it gets really, really, really hard to pay attention to other less stimulating things.


I totally understand.  I'm neither a writer nor a gamer, but I am a physicist and I can become completely absorbed with physics.  Like, if there are zero distractions around me---in my case, noise...I'm unable to "tune out" even the smallest background noises---I can spend all day and night thinking about physics even without meds.

Letting my mind wander; it's euphoria for me.  I get buzzed from it.  It's a physics high.
 
2013-03-04 04:12:02 PM  

ObeliskToucher: Brittabot: I sometimes forget a thought or a request from someone WHILE I'm writing it down.

Favorite semi-memory of this:  My first appointment with a new shrink.  Shrink meets me at the door to her large, bric-a-brac-filled office and introduces herself as we shake hands.  We walk over to the couch and chair and sit down.  Her first question to me:  "What is my name?"

[i260.photobucket.com image 326x304]

/couldn't make it out on her diploma, and she wasn't wearing a name tag
//my usual covering/coping techniques


I LOVE THIS THREAD SO MUCH!
Yes, this is so me. I've thought about inventing a traumatic brain injury to explain why I do not remember names, even if I JUST heard them. Turns out, I don't store them at all. They just go in and right back out again.
 
2013-03-04 04:18:44 PM  

CeroX: This is a chemical imbalance... The brain operates normally because of a delicate balance of chemicals, throw any one of those chemicals out of whack or add a few in that shouldn't be there, and bam, you have a disorder...


Coughfluoridecough.
 
2013-03-04 04:31:53 PM  

Nightjars: Honestly, I think many people have this trait to a certain extent..  But, as is the case of all "mental disorders", it really has to do with how much it interferes with your day-to-day life when trying to decide if it's a symptom of a disorder, or just a weird personality quirk.


Right.  The difference basically boils down to "I'm such a silly goose, I've wasted an hour puttering around at this.  Ah well, back to work", and "fark.  I don't CARE about this shiat.  I need to get to work!  *click* WHY DID I DO THAT?  Huh, that's not interesting at all. *click* DAMMIT.  why aren't I working?  And why do I want cheeseballs all of a sudden?  *click* Oh jesus farking hell."

Of course, for ADHD sufferers, there's also the "There, taxes done.  It's WHAT time?  I missed HOW many meals?  Holy god my bladder!  AUGH."
 
2013-03-04 04:35:49 PM  

Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).


Also have ADD. The experts basically say you should find out if medicating is right for you or not. ADHD tends to have a lot of differences from person to person, and everyone reacts differently to drugs. So yeah.
 
2013-03-04 04:51:32 PM  

Sir Not Sure The Unscannable: CeroX: This is a chemical imbalance... The brain operates normally because of a delicate balance of chemicals, throw any one of those chemicals out of whack or add a few in that shouldn't be there, and bam, you have a disorder...

Coughfluoridecough.


I would think that a chemical imbalance would be suspect if you were injecting toothpaste into your brain
 
2013-03-04 05:26:20 PM  
Made up disease, man up, stop relying on drugs to fix your problems.
 
2013-03-04 05:32:22 PM  

Dimensio: Hagenhatesyouall: Biggest bullshiat diagnosis since "bad blood" IMO.

Funny how school shootings seem to have increased around the same time "doctors" started treating so many kids for "ADD / ADHD / whatthefarkever".

Lack of personal discipline is not a medical disorder, and no drug is going to fix it.

I am certain, then, that you will be able to state your credentials in the field of psychology and that you will be able to reference a substantial body of peer reviewed research that validates your claim. Please do so.


You are absolutely right.

No qualified medical "professional" would EVER sign off on anything that could be potentially harmful to a patient, nor would they ever approve any drug that could be harmful.

consumerinjuryadvocates.com

Doctors have just as many greedy unscrupulous farks as any other "profession".
 
2013-03-04 05:44:05 PM  

TimGuy: Made up disease, man up, stop relying on drugs to fix your problems.


i260.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-04 05:49:11 PM  
I was just diagnosed two weeks ago, I'm 27, and put on adderall. The funny thing is I was one of those people that believed it never existed even in my childhood. Honestly growing up in a middle class whitebread town in the late 90's,there was a horrific stigma about it then especially in such a churchy conservative town. That it was a failure on the parents to control their kids. I didn't start realizing until My sister was diagnosed last summer at 37. One evening we had a talk about growing up 10 years apart and she began talking about her diagnosis, and boy did bells ring. ADHD was something I thought I knew, but really had no idea what it was. It took over six months to commit to asking my doc about it. In just two weeks my life has changed so much for the better. I hope I won't be on meds forever, but I'm really enjoying clarity and focus right now so I'll keep taking them. In two weeks I've finished seven different projects that I started over the last 18 months, my bosses love me now... And I don't talk back or call them idiots anymore. Impulse control is entirely new to me and I'm thankful they are/were willing to put up with me.

Hardest part: Had to cut coffee consumption by nearly 90% because lots of caffeine + meds = ADHD waaay worse. Conversely, small amount of caffeine+ meds= Just Right

Also, I only skimmed a few posts from the first few pages but one thing I was told by my doc, sis, her doc, and a few others is that if you or your friend/family member is Zombie like or just not themself, then it is not the right dose or possibly not the right med. If/when your meds work you are still you only better. There should be no major personality shift when the right dose of the right med is delivered.
 
2013-03-04 06:10:40 PM  
i'm being bloody honest here, but marijuana works wonders for my innatentive ADHD.  not even Adderall touches the problem.
 
2013-03-04 06:21:32 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: i'm being bloody honest here, but marijuana works wonders for my innatentive ADHD.  not even Adderall touches the problem.


I tried that once at a friends recommendation for my insomnia, which is waay better now that I have adderall, I had the opposite effect. I was up all night twitching and I could swear I was following my nerve pathways across my bones and could control them... Not true of course. Never touched it again. 1200-1600 mg caffeine and a pack or more cigs a day was my self medication for a long time. Insomnia was present long before I started either, and was unaffected by both.

Focusing on five different things constantly shifting attention when all you want to do is stop tossing and turning, relax and go to sleep is no way to get through life.
 
2013-03-04 06:23:06 PM  

mattador: Every adult I've met with "ADD" ended up just being bi-polar.


That's called adaptation.
 
2013-03-04 06:27:07 PM  

Dimensio: Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.

From which medical school did you earn your Psychology degree?


www.amctv.com
 
2013-03-04 06:32:21 PM  

AnythingBacon: Jon iz teh kewl: i'm being bloody honest here, but marijuana works wonders for my innatentive ADHD.  not even Adderall touches the problem.

I tried that once at a friends recommendation for my insomnia, which is waay better now that I have adderall, I had the opposite effect. I was up all night twitching and I could swear I was following my nerve pathways across my bones and could control them... Not true of course. Never touched it again. 1200-1600 mg caffeine and a pack or more cigs a day was my self medication for a long time. Insomnia was present long before I started either, and was unaffected by both.

Focusing on five different things constantly shifting attention when all you want to do is stop tossing and turning, relax and go to sleep is no way to get through life.


yeah there are different strains, some are better for insomnia than others.  when legal you might want to try other strains.
 
2013-03-04 06:36:41 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: AnythingBacon: Jon iz teh kewl: i'm being bloody honest here, but marijuana works wonders for my innatentive ADHD.  not even Adderall touches the problem.

I tried that once at a friends recommendation for my insomnia, which is waay better now that I have adderall, I had the opposite effect. I was up all night twitching and I could swear I was following my nerve pathways across my bones and could control them... Not true of course. Never touched it again. 1200-1600 mg caffeine and a pack or more cigs a day was my self medication for a long time. Insomnia was present long before I started either, and was unaffected by both.

Focusing on five different things constantly shifting attention when all you want to do is stop tossing and turning, relax and go to sleep is no way to get through life.

yeah there are different strains, some are better for insomnia than others.  when legal you might want to try other strains.


I do live in Colorado :P

Friend in question has a Medicinal card... Particular strain was supposed to be for relaxation and sleep. Just not my cup o tea. Plus taste and smell make me want to vomit.

Thinks that's weird, lemme tell you about the time They tried to treat me with ambien...
 
2013-03-04 07:13:20 PM  

AnythingBacon: Jon iz teh kewl: AnythingBacon: Jon iz teh kewl: i'm being bloody honest here, but marijuana works wonders for my innatentive ADHD.  not even Adderall touches the problem.

I tried that once at a friends recommendation for my insomnia, which is waay better now that I have adderall, I had the opposite effect. I was up all night twitching and I could swear I was following my nerve pathways across my bones and could control them... Not true of course. Never touched it again. 1200-1600 mg caffeine and a pack or more cigs a day was my self medication for a long time. Insomnia was present long before I started either, and was unaffected by both.

Focusing on five different things constantly shifting attention when all you want to do is stop tossing and turning, relax and go to sleep is no way to get through life.

yeah there are different strains, some are better for insomnia than others.  when legal you might want to try other strains.

I do live in Colorado :P

Friend in question has a Medicinal card... Particular strain was supposed to be for relaxation and sleep. Just not my cup o tea. Plus taste and smell make me want to vomit.

Thinks that's weird, lemme tell you about the time They tried to treat me with ambien...


You took way too much probably.

On a side note, I doubt MJ works for ADD, at least in our particular case it just makes the hyperfocus issues more prominent.
 
2013-03-04 07:31:31 PM  

namegoeshere: optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...


www.explainxkcd.com
 
2013-03-04 07:31:43 PM  
Are they frakking serious? Of course it continues into adulthood. It's what happened to me. When I was a kid it was different. I was overly hyper and had a lot of energy. During college it manifested as extreme lack of motivation in the form of my brain simply not allowing me to do certain things. In the in-between years I had 'in one ear and out the other" to the extreme, didn't really sociaize, etc. I was also more organized as a teen to the point of being borderline OCD. I don't have a substance abuse problem, but I could easily fall into it. I just simply avoid alcohol and weed. I avoid all drugs except nicotine in the form of snus which I'm currently trying to kick.

Definitely don't ignore ADHD If I had it treated as a teen my life would've been much better. Would've actually had friends, been valedictorian instead of not giving a frak and doing the bare minimum. The coulda.shoulda,wouldas do no one any good. It is what it is.

The issue with the substance abuse is self-medication. Alcohol, nicotine, weed, and stimulants effect people differently with ADHD due to brain chemistry. The depression is secondary meaning it has no cause. It simply is. All of those things are offshoot symptoms of ADHD minus the hypomania. The deal with that is there is a thin line between ADHD and bipolar and mania is a symptom of bipolar. Basically the line can get thinner and thinner as time goes on.

/psychology major with ADHD
 
2013-03-04 07:35:43 PM  

ADHD Librarian: namegoeshere: optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...

[www.explainxkcd.com image 740x642]


Yep, that's it!
 
2013-03-04 07:45:12 PM  

Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).


I was never diagnosed as a kid (almost nobody was back then), but as soon as I heard about it, I knew it was me. I got an unofficial diagnosis in my early 20s, when my stepmother was doing a masters of special ed. She gave me some big quiz which went back to her professor who rolled his eyes and said "yep, he can come and see me if he wants to do anything about it". I didn't, so I didn't.
Many years later, I was working as a children's librarian when the library manager and deputy manager both resigned. So I ended up acting in senior management for about 18 months. At that stage I got an official diagnosis and went on meds for a while. As a children's librarian, suddenly deciding I was a lion and wandering through the shelves growling was seen as me doing my job. In management, during a meeting with the CEO and the mayor, less so.
I go on and off the meds depending on the job I have and how much study I am doing. there has never been any dependence on them and as for living without them. Well, I can actually put things in place when I am medicated (work systems, filing systems) which I can then use when I am not on them.
My real problem with having been medicated is with the self awareness. I really didn't know just how much of a dick I could be at times. The trouble is, now the awareness switch has been flipped I am aware. But when I am not on the meds, I am aware but completely unable to do anything about it. Which as you can imagine gets rather frustrating at times.
 
2013-03-04 08:01:03 PM  
I fixed the ending.

i3.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-04 08:10:07 PM  

simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.


Failure? WTF are you talking about. ADHD has oft times been my greatest strength. You just need the right job (or the right boss who will look at your results, not your process). Working in a busy public library with people coming at you from every direction. Kid just took a dump in the fiction section, old bloke has to submit a resume online but he has never seen a mouse before, woman wants the January 1923 copy of the local paper, the bank of computers near the wall need reimaging, there is a box of new books, 3 of which are books which already have reservations on them, the new art exhibition needs hanging but the picture rails haven't arrived...
I can ride that wave in a way that (so it seems) causes those poor 'normal' folk to freak the hell out and curl up in a small ball mewing pitifully.
Plus, throw me in a board meeting and I will give you 5 or 6 views on the strategic plan which no one else had considered and a possible cheap solution to a problem no one thought we could solve without spending wads of cash.
Yep, I may look like a goof-off sometimes, when things have slowed down. I may be on FARK at work or playing on my phone during the meeting. But even that is good thing as a librarian. I have a reasonable knowledge of online culture so other staff members come to me when they are stuck on a question in that area. It has also helped me develop a keen eye for the new stuff which we could use to improve our service.
Throw in the occasional day/week/month when I come in after a good handful of dexies to clear up my backlog of mundane tasks and I am a bloody good employee.
Hell, I have been headhunted for jobs because people want this attitude/mindset. I have been seconded to other departments when their managers have been going through changes because I do change management well (perhaps because everything is change when life has no routine), I have been asked to be on conference committees and (more recently) been given a directorship in a large national not for profit.
/the only failure is in your imagination


mattador: Every adult I've met with "ADD" ended up just being bi-polar.


Yeah, I had a psych tell me that once. Except I am less bi-polar and more mono-polar. Manic, slightly less manic. Without the depressive I fail to see why I would treat things as if I was bi-polar?
I can see though why some ADHD folks end up depressed. It could be bloody hard to find a job which is a good fit for this mindset (I guess I've been lucky, both in the jobs I have managed to get and also in being (ego alert) one of those high performing IQ off the charts ADHD folk. Would be a bastard of a life if I was ADHD and thick). But, if you can't get yourself together it would be easy to slide into depression and depressed +ADHD could look very bi-polar.
 
2013-03-05 12:59:59 AM  

ADHD Librarian: Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).

I was never diagnosed as a kid (almost nobody was back then), but as soon as I heard about it, I knew it was me. I got an unofficial diagnosis in my early 20s, when my stepmother was doing a masters of special ed. She gave me some big quiz which went back to her professor who rolled his eyes and said "yep, he can come and see me if he wants to do anything about it". I didn't, so I didn't.
Many years later, I was working as a children's librarian when the library manager and deputy manager both resigned. So I ended up acting in senior management for about 18 months. At that stage I got an official diagnosis and went on meds for a while. As a children's librarian, suddenly deciding I was a lion and wandering through the shelves growling was seen as me doing my job. In management, during a meeting with the CEO and the mayor, less so.
I go on and off the meds depending on the job I have and how much study I am doing. there has never been any dependence on them and as for living without them. Well, I can actually put things in place when I am medicated (work systems, filing systems) which I can then use when I am not on them.
My real problem with having been medicated is with the self awareness. I really didn't know just how much of a dick I could be at times. The trouble is, now the awareness switch has been flipped I am aware. But when I am not on the meds, I am aware but completely unable to do anything about it. Which as you can imagine gets rather frustrating at times.


It's all dependent. My job requires me to track and process large amounts of information that isn't linear, its all random stuff. I excell at this, it's easy for me, my brain can file random shiat away in an organized way. Side note, for the opposite reason i cant use daily planners. But when I get off shift and have to so paperwork, holy hell, it becomes impossible. My colleagues that don't have ADD are the opposite, they are great paper pushers, but struggle to maintain the situational awareness I have on what's going on with all the incoming info. They have to study the information to stay on top of it whereas I can read it once and not have to look at it again
 
2013-03-05 02:07:14 AM  

ADHD Librarian: namegoeshere: optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...


imgs.xkcd.com

Came for this, leaving satisfied.  it really does feel just like that, makes it hard to finish the simplest of tasks - or, conversely, you can get locked into finishing a non-urgent task to the extent that you can't focus on the actual important stuff until it is done.
 
2013-03-05 07:09:32 AM  

Mayhem_2006: ADHD Librarian: namegoeshere: optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...

[imgs.xkcd.com image 740x642]

Came for this, leaving satisfied.  it really does feel just like that, makes it hard to finish the simplest of tasks - or, conversely, you can get locked into finishing a non-urgent task to the extent that you can't focus on the actual important stuff until it is done.


no it doesn't, it's just a scheme to get high powered amphetamines from the doctor
so ANY picture encouraging this idea would be beneficial for your situation
farking speed head
 
2013-03-05 07:10:20 AM  

Jon iz teh kewl: Mayhem_2006: ADHD Librarian: namegoeshere: optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...

[imgs.xkcd.com image 740x642]

Came for this, leaving satisfied.  it really does feel just like that, makes it hard to finish the simplest of tasks - or, conversely, you can get locked into finishing a non-urgent task to the extent that you can't focus on the actual important stuff until it is done.

no it doesn't, it's just a scheme to get high powered amphetamines from the doctor
so ANY picture encouraging this idea would be beneficial for your situation
farking speed head


that "math" balloon should read "meth"
 
2013-03-05 07:14:12 AM  

Mayhem_2006: ADHD Librarian: namegoeshere: optional: I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

Yeah, that was not phrased well. It's not a lack of willpower. It's that "Oh look, the trash needs to go out" does not connect with the steps needed to take the trash out. It's not laziness, because I'll be doing three other things when I walk by the full trash and think that it needs to go out. But if I set down the three other things to attend to the trash, then by the time the trash is done, the three other things are forgotten and I have moved on. So I stick with the three other things and think that I will do the trash next but by the time I am done what I am doing (or the thing that has distracted me from the thing that I was doing) I have lost the bit about the trash until I walk past it again and think "Oh look, the trash needs to go out"...

[imgs.xkcd.com image 740x642]

Came for this, leaving satisfied.  it really does feel just like that, makes it hard to finish the simplest of tasks - or, conversely, you can get locked into finishing a non-urgent task to the extent that you can't focus on the actual important stuff until it is done.


Yep, when that cartoon went up I immediately checked behing my couch because I was sure that Randall Munroe was watching me from somewhere (I now realise he is not in my country, so must be using the webcam on my laptop). I showed it to my wife, who looked somewhat puzzled. I don't know how to explain my brain any better than showing people that image.
 
2013-03-05 12:02:06 PM  
it really does feel just like that,

Jon iz teh kewl: no it doesn't, it's just a scheme to get high powered amphetamines from the doctor


Hey now. Why can't it be both?

(And actually, you mean  low-powered amphetamines, although that's part of why they're popular as recreational drugs. You don't need to burn out your brain on the hard stuff to enjoy being wired.)
 
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