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(Medpage Today)   ADHD may continue into adulthood. "Oh god, oh god, oh god, KITTY"   (medpagetoday.com) divider line 203
    More: Scary, ADHD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Children's Hospital Boston, MedPage Today, mental disorders, psychiatric hospitals, population study  
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4778 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2013 at 8:47 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-04 11:06:45 AM  
Normally, for an ADD person, there isn't enough stimulus in menial or mundane tasks for the brain to respond to... so the brain wanders, looking for more stimulating or engaging material in order so make up for that deficiency a menial and mundane life.

FTFM
 
2013-03-04 11:06:50 AM  

simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.


The people that use it as an excuse are generally lying. It's more than just normal forgetfulness, I've gotten in the car to go somewhere and forgotten where I was going and had to drive back home. If a task does not go into my to do pile as soon as I think of it, it will be forgotten. You learn to live with it, but I thank my good fortune everyday for Mrs. Chemist, because living alongside me has got to be infuriating.
 
2013-03-04 11:08:29 AM  
Biggest bullshiat diagnosis since "bad blood" IMO.

Funny how school shootings seem to have increased around the same time "doctors" started treating so many kids for "ADD / ADHD / whatthefarkever".

Lack of personal discipline is not a medical disorder, and no drug is going to fix it.
 
2013-03-04 11:09:20 AM  

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.



If only there was a natural, safe substance that could help... www.bongsbay.com
 
2013-03-04 11:11:19 AM  
ADHD may continue into adulthood. "Oh god, oh god, oh god, KITTY"

I ran into an adult the other day.  Naturally they were all like "Oh god, oh god, oh god".
 
2013-03-04 11:12:55 AM  

orclover: theMightyRegeya: Don't worry, Thunderpipes' professors at the Medical School of Life tell him that your son is just being lazy.  Tell him to snap out of it.  He'll be fine.

People like that cant seem to stay in the room with my son for more than a few minutes.  It's why we haven't heard from my wifes parents in a year.  They just couldn't take it and the whole situation didn't fit their extremely conservative world view.  If we didn't have SS for him, we would be destroyed by his condition.  We almost were when he was a toddler before we got him on it.  So rather than accept that this is the reality that we have with him, they just go into avoidance and denial.  It's just easier.  Hell wish we could do that.


Just so we're clear, I was using your comment to express my disgust at one of Fark's resident idiots.  I have nothing but sympathy for you.  I have two healthy, fairly well-behaved kids, and if anything one of them will have anxiety issues like me...but I see other people who have kids with serious physical health problems.  A high-school friend just had a fundraiser to have a tumor removed from his daughter's heart.  I see people with severely autistic kids, know people with children with schizophrenia, and all manner of physical and mental problems.  It's because of my good fortune that I feel terrible when I see someone with real problems...and why I get genuinely angry at people who are, in all likelihood, just trolling.  I'd assume people like Thunderpipes are just trolling, if not for the number of people who believe, In Real Life, that all mental problems can be cured with a little Get Off Your Lazy Ass and some Pray To Jesus is the only other thing.

I honestly believe that, yes, some people are misdiagnosed, but I have to think that some of the diagnoses are of people who used to just be deemed lazy or crazy.
 
2013-03-04 11:15:34 AM  

Thunderpipes: Dimensio: Thunderpipes: Made up diseases continue to grow in number, news at 11:00.

Good smacking now and then cures that early. ADHD is a term for laziness and lack of discipline, enabled by poor parenting. South Park had that right.

From which medical school did you earn your Psychology degree?

Medical School of Life.

Guy above said he can't bring himself to muster the will to take the trash out? That is a goddamn disease now? Come on. That's why none of this crap existed a few decades ago. Parents straightened their kids out before they grew up sheltered and crying on the couch while the trash piled up.


Excellent credentials, sir. I shall give any further comments, statements and hypotheses, put forth by you, the true level of attention they deserve.
 
2013-03-04 11:15:41 AM  
theMightyRegeya:

Yeah, TP is a notorious troll... And i see a lot of other names to add to the list in this thread as well...
 
2013-03-04 11:18:18 AM  

George Babbitt: Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feingold_diet  <---Changed my life.

/not quackery


I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well.  These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.

I'm hoping to find a good cognitive-behavioral therapy program to enroll him in to help manage his ADD better soon.

ADD is more than medication therapy, it's diet, behavioral and organizational skills, and exercise.

/Hubby was diagnosed at 21
//Can't be his project manager 24/7 :)
 
2013-03-04 11:18:33 AM  

Lupine Chemist: simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.

The people that use it as an excuse are generally lying. It's more than just normal forgetfulness, I've gotten in the car to go somewhere and forgotten where I was going and had to drive back home. If a task does not go into my to do pile as soon as I think of it, it will be forgotten. You learn to live with it, but I thank my good fortune everyday for Mrs. Chemist, because living alongside me has got to be infuriating.


Establishing routines and patterns is helpful in overcoming such difficulties. My inability to focus impacts my ability to make decisions; because I cannot concentrate upon options for substantial durations, I become indecisive even when determining what to eat (this indecisiveness then causes further problems as my attempt to decide upon a food choice delays other tasks). Through establishing a pattern of a specific meal for each day of the week, I eliminate that indecision.
 
2013-03-04 11:18:49 AM  
Two16,
If only there was a natural, safe substance that could help.


Yeah, but do you really want to walk around looking like surfer dude kitty all of the time...

Look, Squirrel!
.
 
2013-03-04 11:19:36 AM  

Hagenhatesyouall: Biggest bullshiat diagnosis since "bad blood" IMO.

Funny how school shootings seem to have increased around the same time "doctors" started treating so many kids for "ADD / ADHD / whatthefarkever".

Lack of personal discipline is not a medical disorder, and no drug is going to fix it.


I am certain, then, that you will be able to state your credentials in the field of psychology and that you will be able to reference a substantial body of peer reviewed research that validates your claim. Please do so.
 
2013-03-04 11:21:30 AM  
I thought I had ADD.  It turns out I just let out my inner asshole when I tire of your crap
 
2013-03-04 11:25:29 AM  

shortymac: I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well. These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.


Really? Hm!

My son's (new) psychiatrist mentioned gluten-free, but she also said reduced sugar, red dye, and ... God I forget what else. I did like her idea of giving him fish oil pills. Just gonna find small ones!

Might try out a week of gluten-free for the boy and see what it does.
 
2013-03-04 11:27:20 AM  

Felgraf: simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.

I'm such a failure, I'm a year away from getting my PhD in physics.

/STFU yourself, son.


Yes but either getting that doctorate done at 25 or finally got around to it at 80 :)

It's funny because you know what I mean.
 
2013-03-04 11:30:09 AM  

fredklein: FatherChaos:
I've never seen that Calvin and Hobbes.  That's seriously depressing.

Here's the antidote:

[i93.photobucket.com image 768x260]



i46.tinypic.com

/more salve
 
2013-03-04 11:35:07 AM  

Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.


All this is true.  I was diagnosed when I was about 33 years old.   Adderall has been a godsend for me.
 
2013-03-04 11:35:40 AM  
Without all these made up diseases, guess who would be out of a job?

Think about it.

But this is Fark, where everyone has a poor life story, is sad depressed, fat, and has AD&D.
 
2013-03-04 11:40:01 AM  

FizixJunkee: All this is true. I was diagnosed when I was about 33 years old. Adderall has been a godsend for me.


I'm glad I'm not the only one. To hear me talk about it, I sound like a shill for Adderall. :P

I feel like the Amish Laughing Guy, going "Ha! Ha! I can work!"

Let me tell you about my databases... :P
 
2013-03-04 11:44:54 AM  

Thunderpipes: Without all these made up diseases, guess who would be out of a job?

Think about it.

But this is Fark, where everyone has a poor life story, is sad depressed, fat, and has AD&D.


You have still referenced no peer reviewed scientific publications that support your initial assertion.
 
2013-03-04 11:45:53 AM  

Anthracite: Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).

Me too. I just considered it a strength that I could use to do several things at once.I am Autistic and so my processing is lowered. My ADHD speeds it up and helps me look at different things at once. It helps me make better decisions because my mind can move on to other possibilities.  I am also a master multitasker. I can't stay on one thing long without forcing myself. Maybe we dont need treatment just because the rest of the world doesn't have our skills.


Exactly. You pity me for not being able to stay on a single task? I pity you for not being able to multi-task or process large amounts of information as fast as me. It's not a disorder, it's a different way our brain works.
 
2013-03-04 11:48:00 AM  
In other news, amphetamine dependency may continue as long as we can convince the cohort to keep giving us money.
 
2013-03-04 11:52:30 AM  

Two16: Brittabot: Well, yeah. And sometimes you struggle with ADD your entire goddamn life while being misdiagnosed with a host of other disorders that are all just symptoms of your long untreated ADD, then are told as an adult that you can't possibly have ADD because you were never diagnosed as a child...

I finally got my ADD diagnosis at 33, and I have to say, the symptoms are INFINITELY more impairing as an adult than they were when I was a kid.

There really needs to be more resources for adults with ADD. Kids can have it tough too but add adult responsibilities to the problems of ADD and it can get damn near unbearable trying to juggle everything when your stupid distracted forgetful brain seems to sabotage every effort to complete even the simplest task.

/still trying to find meds that work.


If only there was a natural, safe substance that could help... [www.bongsbay.com image 162x172]


I spent ten years thinking that lie worked, it doesn't it just makes you unthink it does.
 
2013-03-04 11:57:15 AM  

Gdalescrboz: I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).


Doesn't ADHD usually come with a tendency to <a href="http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/612.html">hyperfocus</ a>?  Although not necessarily on what your real priority is.  It's not, as so many people seem to think, a lack of attention.  It's a lack of ability to control the focus of your attention.
 
2013-03-04 11:59:02 AM  
I have found adderall helps, but for me it loses effectiveness over time and ruins my ability to enjoy caffeinated drinks. There's nothing like having your heart try to leap out of your chest because you had a cup of regular coffee.

/I should probably reup my prescription since my Java and C# classes are kicking my ass
//sit down, try to hack out some code, nothing works, get frustrated and try again later, rinse, repeat
 
2013-03-04 12:02:48 PM  

Cerridwen: As an Adult diagnosed with both ADD and Bipolar, i'm getting a kick....

As the Mother of a 10 year old who is diagnosed ADHD and 'Unspecified Mood Disorder', I am not getting a kick...

Honestly I can understand how people can view those with ADHD as lazy or uncontrolled. If I didn't experiance it on a daily basis, I'd probably think my son was a "brat, undiciplined, ect" too. With the Bi Polar on top of it, if I'm not medicated it can get interesting. I find it interesting that people advocate non medication, for ADHD. Would anyone suggest that I not take meds for my Bipolar disorder? Or someone who was schizoprenic? I certianly functioned for a long time with my ADD (and bipolar) unmedicated. But I function so much better with the medication.

But to those who view ADD/ADHD as a 'cop out' fake disease, do you also believe things like bipolar, or schizoprenia are made up?
If not, why?  You can't 'see' those any more than you can ADD/ADHD.
In fact you can actually see the difference in a person with ADHD vs not in brain scans and they are finding that ADHD brains do not function like brains that do not have ADHD.

">http://www.adhd.org.nz/neuro1.ht ml
">http: //www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110105094117.htm
">http://article s.washingtonpost.com/2009-09-22/news/36869441_1_attentio n-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-dopamine-nora-volkow


I think the issue is that ADD symptoms can be confused with many other disorders, crappy diets with a lack of exercise, and over-stimulation. There's no blood test for mental disorders so we can only go by symptoms and other diagnostic tests which I think to the layman makes these "less real".

IMHO, if these diets completely cured (rather than simply helped, there's a big difference) someone, they probably didn't have it in the first place or a mild case of it to begin with.

It's similar to the hippie's claim that a Gluten-Free diet curing Autism. The kid probably had a GI disorder and/or a wheat allergy that caused the kid lots of pain and/or caused some cognitive side-effects.
 
2013-03-04 12:03:41 PM  

raygundan: Gdalescrboz: I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).

Doesn't ADHD usually come with a tendency to <a href="http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/612.html">hyperfocus</ a>?  Although not necessarily on what your real priority is.  It's not, as so many people seem to think, a lack of attention.  It's a lack of ability to control the focus of your attention.


I am employed as the senior computer support staff in a department at a university. My ability to hyperfocus has enabled me to dedicate multiple hours -- even days -- of work upon tasks intended to streamline system and software deployment. Through hours of effort, I have been able to save literally minutes of time.
 
2013-03-04 12:04:32 PM  

Dimensio: Thunderpipes: Without all these made up diseases, guess who would be out of a job?

Think about it.

But this is Fark, where everyone has a poor life story, is sad depressed, fat, and has AD&D.

You have still referenced no peer reviewed scientific publications that support your initial assertion.


There are scads of peer reviewed articles that challenge the validity of the ADHD diagnosis.

But if you are looking for a "scientific" or "empirical" article to support that assertion, you will not find one, because 1)psychiatric/psychological disorders are developed through consensus and 2)there are no objectives bases on which to confirm or disconfirm their presence, as with a lesion on the temporal lobe for example.

Psychiatric diagnoses may reflect potential disorders, but they are also products of social and political processes. All you have to do is refer to homosexuality, once described as a disorder. we cannot convene a focus group or march on DC to say that parksinson's is no longer a disorder because it is 1)objectively verifiable and 2)its categorization as such is not contingent on social and political whims.
 
2013-03-04 12:09:27 PM  
It has carried over into adulthood for me, but I have learned to control it for the most part without the help of medication. There are still times when I don't stop myself before doing something or saying something wrong for the situation, but the distraction aspect is almost completely under control. Both my nephews have ADHD and have been on medication since they were 6. My oldest nephew is 19 and shows no signs of being able to control himself when he is off his medication and I am wondering if it is because he never had to learn how to handle it. Granted my nephews' childhood has been far better than mine was since they had no idea what ADHD was when I was growing up and treated me as a disruptive student. My treatment translated through the teacher's to the students creating an outcast persona around me that isolated me and limited my interaction with other students to being abused verbally and physically. I was treated harshly all through school despite being highly intelligent in math, science and history (notice I didn't say language? Grammar yeah working on that) mostly scoring 100% on all tests in those subjects. I often wonder if it would have been better to trade my control now for a better childhood then.
 
2013-03-04 12:11:57 PM  
 raygun
Yes, and it is why I get bored with things very quickly. For me, I can focus very intensely for short periods of time then my brain switches its attention to something else.  So what I do is set myself up with multiple tasks and pop back and depending on what grabs my attention  I usually get my best ideas when I'm not thinking about the task I'm working on.  I'll read a word or see a picture and it will cause a chain reaction of ideas on one of my other tasks.  I'll then switch to that and work on it until something else pops up.
 
2013-03-04 12:20:26 PM  
Hi,

My name is cchinni and I have ADHD.

As an adult with ADHD I am NOT getting a kick out of these replies...although I must admit to not having read them all.

The narrative about walking by the trash can 4 times and realizing each time that it needs to be taken out is a very good description of the problem.  I just wish you would not have finished it off the way you did.  It is not that I do not want to do it, I just completely forget that I was going to do it before I even get to the trash bags.  For this reason I keep similar items together when most "normal" people would not.  My trash bags are in their box right next to the trash can...if they are not, there is a 90% chance that the trash can is overflowing.

I wish that the "....SHINY" meme would go away...we rarely do that.  Hyper-Focus and Hyper-Unfocus are much more common.  Many people that I know think it would be great to be able to carry on multiple conversations at the same time...try it some time and see if any of those people feel that you are truly paying attention to them.

I find a few things helpful:
1. Regimentation.  I get out of bed the same time every day (even weekends).  I do the same activities every morning, regardless of what the day's tasks are.  My wife laughs about my "routines" but she has seen that if I can not find my toothpaste easily I will forget to wear deodorant.  Strange but true...and a bit embarrassing.

2. Natural stimulants (i.e. caffeine!!!):  Preferably in moderate doses spaced throughout the day.  And I avoid any type of depressants (beer, alcohol).  What helps you relax (like a glass of wine after dinner) will either trigger hyper-focus or hyper-unfocus in me OR cause me to fall asleep on the couch at 8 PM.

3. Over-Stimulation.  I find that having multiple monitors on my desk helps me to focus on tasks on a single monitor.  Not sure I can explain why, it just does. And I am all in for something that works and is not Meds.

4. The Feingold Diet is what got me through school.  Very few of my teachers knew that I had ADHD.  My parents did not make it an issue, and I have not made it a crutch.  My mom just told the teachers that I was "Allergic" to artificial flavors and colors...and in the 1980's this was very very difficult.  I could eat 2 types of cereal, 3 types of candy (and no one really likes bit-o-honey!), 1 flavor of soda (Coke, (not classic at the time, just Coca-Cola)), only 1 few brands of bread, a few flavors of ice cream (none at a "parlor").  Was it worth it?  Yes.  Do I still practice it today?  Somewhat.  I know which of these are my worst triggers and avoid them.

Something that you may not know is that one of the trigger chemicals occurs naturally in apples.  I had a glass of apple cider last month and I could not concentrate on anything for more than 30 seconds...it made my drive in to work almost impossible.

So, for those of you without ADHD that actually finished reading this..please understand what we are telling you.

We are not looking for sympathy or an excuse.  We are not asking you to treat us any different that we treat you.  We don't want it listed on our records so that we fall under ADA protection.  We definately do not want any more "....Shiny" jokes.  :(

We just want you to understand what we are doing and why we can't seem to control it.

The analogy with addiction problems was very accurate.  Alcoholics CAN quit with assistance.  They are still Alcoholics though...I CAN control my ADHD with assistance, but I still have ADHD.

Sincerely,

cchinni
 
2013-03-04 12:32:31 PM  
You want to learn who really has ADHD? Give them a 30 mg adderall. If they can sit in one spot and read a book, they have it.

I am one of the ones who had ADHD continue on later in life, bringing depression with it. Adderall helps with the focus, but all I can focus on is my depression. It sucks, but I'm back in college and I have no other choice. All my grades improved dramatically with the introduction of the medication.
 
2013-03-04 12:42:04 PM  

Aidan: shortymac: I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well. These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.

Really? Hm!

My son's (new) psychiatrist mentioned gluten-free, but she also said reduced sugar, red dye, and ... God I forget what else. I did like her idea of giving him fish oil pills. Just gonna find small ones!

Might try out a week of gluten-free for the boy and see what it does.


It's actually a great help, however you'll have to check labels, etc because it's going to be hard for them to remember to do it. (With a kid it's easier, obviously) I'm still trying to get my hubby to give up coca-cola but that's hard.

My hubby says it helps makes his brain feel less "busy". Here's a interesting video about it as well:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79Y5pEv1NCs

I recommend going on Amazon and preemptively buying GF replacements for their favorite sauces and foods to make it an easier transition. For my hubby it's BBQ sauce and grilled cheese. The Schar (I think I spelled it right) brand of GF free breads and pasta tastes like the real thing.
On a side note, if you haven't already find a cognitive behavioral program for your son that focuses on ADD-friendly organization and study skills. My husband only had medication therapy and while it's a great help he was still suffering from the lack of organization that comes with ADD.

/I was on a GF diet for my IBS anyway so I was used to it
//EIP for recipes, etc.
 
2013-03-04 12:46:09 PM  

Profedius: It has carried over into adulthood for me, but I have learned to control it for the most part without the help of medication. There are still times when I don't stop myself before doing something or saying something wrong for the situation, but the distraction aspect is almost completely under control. Both my nephews have ADHD and have been on medication since they were 6. My oldest nephew is 19 and shows no signs of being able to control himself when he is off his medication and I am wondering if it is because he never had to learn how to handle it. Granted my nephews' childhood has been far better than mine was since they had no idea what ADHD was when I was growing up and treated me as a disruptive student. My treatment translated through the teacher's to the students creating an outcast persona around me that isolated me and limited my interaction with other students to being abused verbally and physically. I was treated harshly all through school despite being highly intelligent in math, science and history (notice I didn't say language? Grammar yeah working on that) mostly scoring 100% on all tests in those subjects. I often wonder if it would have been better to trade my control now for a better childhood then.


That is the truth, it happened with my Husband. He had to go off his meds due to lack of insurance and his ADD was getting the better of him. It was a very frustrating time for him and I.

Meds aren't a cure-all.
 
2013-03-04 12:46:13 PM  
ADHD strikes me as one of those illnesses that do exist, but that end up being heavily over-diagnosed. I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

I've been diagnosed with depression. Means a lot of times, I don't want to do much more than lie on my bed and vegetate. Even so, I forced myself to go to class while at school, forced myself to engage with people socially, and currently force myself to go to work (though not today, because I'm actually running a slight fever).

I'm not going to lie: doing the above doesn't make me better or happier (barring interacting socially, which does help). Often, it makes me quite miserable. But it's simply what has to be done.
 
2013-03-04 12:46:46 PM  
I'd like to say that people that deny this is an actual condition are just misinformed, but honestly, reading some of them here, it's pretty clear they're just ignorant.  Part of the reason I don't tell anyone in my personal life about my ADD diagnosis is because it's just easier to keep it to myself, and let the results speak for themselves.

I wasn't diagnosed until my late 20s, after about a decade of "dealing" with it, suffering financially due to my inability to manage money, priorities, etc.  I didn't go to college, because I just barely made it out of High school, and at the time I figured it would just lead to further debt and in the end, I'd get very little out of it.  I do not regret that decision.  I work in the IT field, entirely self-taught, but was never able to move into the more advanced areas I had wanted to go into, as it requires a good deal of study and application, something I just couldn't do.  You could give me the best textbook on a subject money could buy, I could love it, and I would read every page, but generally I'd forget what was on the first page by the time the second page came around.

Once I was diagnosed and began medication, I was able to actually read and *retain* what I was reading in one go.  In 2008, I was able to go from "support guy" to software developer in about 2 months as I was able to spend my free time reading, learning and applying knowledge almost immediately.  At this point I work at a large company analyzing databases, and creating and troubleshooting reports.  I have taught myself several programming languages, as well as several spoken languages just in the last 4 years.

I'm not precisely where I want to be yet, but at this point, where I want to be is a likelihood whereas prior to medication, I had pretty much hit my peak after high school.

When I first started my medication, I had kind of an emotional crisis as I realized that my life would have been significantly different had I had this diagnosis in my teens rather than after I had already made all the mistakes I had, but you have to move on, so I did.

My medication begins and ends, so I still feel the effects when it's worn off, or if I just don't take it on my days off, and my wife will tell you the difference is stunning.  I'll get a bowl of cereal and leave the cabinets open, forget if I turned the stove off despite always making a point to do so, forget entire conversations almost immediately, interrupt people mid conversation, and generally appear "lazy".  All of these, I am aware of but simply cannot control.  I may be able to remember to close the cabinets or have the foresight to write stuff down when given a task of some sort, but for every one of those moments, I completely drop the ball on about 15 other things.  It's just not manageable, which is why it's an illness and not a matter of being lazy.

The point being, people can talk about how you can just slap some focus into your child, and by all means, let them.  In the end, they will be regarded by their undiagnosed children as the ignorant bullies they are, and they can live with the fact that their uninformed assumptions may have seriously crippled their child's chances at a happy life.  Really, unless you've experienced it in some way, I can see how it's an unrelatable illness, but most people can think rationally and at least accept that it's a thing.  Some people feel the need to deny ADD exists, so they can then point to those diagnosed with it with a feeling of superiority about their own miserable lives.

/way too long, sorry.
 
2013-03-04 12:50:44 PM  
Immagine you are driving across the salt flats toward a distant peak.  You are in a car with loose steering and you constantly have to correct.  Now all the peaks in the distance look very similar, but if you focus real hard, you can keep aiming at the same one. This is similar to a standard attention span.

Now lets say you have ADD.  The steering is so loose that you need to make a quarter turn to adjust the bearing.  Now you also have a speed issue. If you go too slow, the car will stall. If you go too fast, the car will overheat.  There is a stack of bills on the passenger seat, and some of them are past due.  Every time you take your eyes off the horizon, you may drift off by one or two distant peaks.  Now as long as you put a serious effort into it, you can focus on that one peak, and keep your speed constant in the corner of your eye. Those are the 'good' days.  Other days, that stack of bills just becomes too much of a concern and you have to sort them out.

With ADD, you will know you need to pay a bill on the 12th.  The bill came in the mail on the 1st, but you are tired as you get home and put it on the counter.  The 4th comes by and you see the bill again.  You decide to get your checkbook and pay it now.  Cant find the checkbook?  Oh well, you still have time.  Now it is the 7th, but it is a Sunday no mail would go out anyway.  Ut oh, while you are driving to work on the 9th it dawns on you that that bill must be due soon.  Was it due on the 20th or the 21st (You just know there is a 2 in it).  Friday! Finally we are at the week end!  This pile of mail is getting big again.  I'll go through it tomorrow.  Saturday the 13th.  Oh, crap! How did I let this bill get past due again?  I'd better pay it online.  What was the password to that site again?.....
 
2013-03-04 12:51:12 PM  

shortymac: Aidan: shortymac: I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well. These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.

Really? Hm!

My son's (new) psychiatrist mentioned gluten-free, but she also said reduced sugar, red dye, and ... God I forget what else. I did like her idea of giving him fish oil pills. Just gonna find small ones!

Might try out a week of gluten-free for the boy and see what it does.

It's actually a great help, however you'll have to check labels, etc because it's going to be hard for them to remember to do it. (With a kid it's easier, obviously) I'm still trying to get my hubby to give up coca-cola but that's hard.

My hubby says it helps makes his brain feel less "busy". Here's a interesting video about it as well:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79Y5pEv1NCs

I recommend going on Amazon and preemptively buying GF replacements for their favorite sauces and foods to make it an easier transition. For my hubby it's BBQ sauce and grilled cheese. The Schar (I think I spelled it right) brand of GF free breads and pasta tastes like the real thing.
On a side note, if you haven't already find a cognitive behavioral program for your son that focuses on ADD-friendly organization and study skills. My husband only had medication therapy and while it's a great help he was still suffering from the lack of organization that comes with ADD.

/I was on a GF diet for my IBS anyway so I was used to it
//EIP for recipes, etc.


I've never understood the hype for "Gluten Free"... The only thing i've seen on the subject is a lot of suggesting... Studies "suggest" people could be allergic to gluten and could cause fat problems, Studies "suggest" gluten leads to obesity, studies "suggest" a lot, and because of that i've heard a lot of anecdotal stories talking about how much better people's lives are without gluten...

But here's the thing

What you are talking about is removing the protein out of flour... So in essence, you are buying pure, pharmaceutical grade carbohydrates. No protein, no fiber, just a white powder derived and refined from a perfectly normal plant... kind of like another white powder derived from an otherwise healthy plant...

My wife and I have gone to milling our own grain, and once you get over the new texture of bread (it's a little grainier than your typical wonder bread), it's quite satisfying...
 
2013-03-04 12:54:01 PM  
As an 33 year old man who has suffered from ADHD his whole life,
 
2013-03-04 12:59:51 PM  

optional: ADHD strikes me as one of those illnesses that do exist, but that end up being heavily over-diagnosed. I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

I've been diagnosed with depression. Means a lot of times, I don't want to do much more than lie on my bed and vegetate. Even so, I forced myself to go to class while at school, forced myself to engage with people socially, and currently force myself to go to work (though not today, because I'm actually running a slight fever).

I'm not going to lie: doing the above doesn't make me better or happier (barring interacting socially, which does help). Often, it makes me quite miserable. But it's simply what has to be done.


Using the trash analogy, yeah I can focus myself to make a point to do it, but doing so requires significantly more effort than you'd think it should, and that can easily be superseded by other tasks that arise in the meantime, and then other tasks supersede those, and so on.  I can spend a day solid starting tasks and not finish one.

People with ADHD aren't non-functional, it just requires a significant amount of effort to go through the day doing normal everyday things.  A more appropriate comparison with depression would be like me telling you "just stop being down".  In my non-medical opinion, depression has the secondary effect of making you not want to do anything.  ADHD makes it difficult to accomplish things, which can very easily lead to being unhappy.

I can more easily raise my spirits, you can more easily force yourself to accomplish stuff.  Neither of us can just will the root problem away.
 
2013-03-04 01:05:11 PM  

Felgraf: simusid: I know WAY too many people that say they or someone they know has adult ADHD.  I don't buy it.  Yeah, I'd rather be doing a lot of other things than work too.  Yeah I find it hard to concentrate too.  STFU, GBTW.   The only common factor in all of your life failures is you.

I'm such a failure, I'm a year away from getting my PhD in physics.

/STFU yourself, son.


Like Felgraf, I'm a physics PhD student with ADHD (though I wasn't diagnosed until after undergrad).  I'm also far from a failure.
 
2013-03-04 01:06:34 PM  

Dimensio: RexTalionis: Gifted Many Few: Happy Hours: You sound ADHD. (not really, but you see how it works now?)

I've been told I have Aspergers. Not from a doctor, but from people that hear how I talk. I am the guy that will complain about my food not being done right in a restaurant or telling the mailman to wipe his feet before walking on my porch. I don't have a social condition, I just tell people how it is.

I feel ADHD is the same thing. Someone isn't doing well, we have to have a medical reason, so they can't be persecuted.

You're making a blanket determination of the validity of a condition based on a few comments a few non-medically trained lay people made to you in describing your behavior.

Do you understand how stupid and illogical that is?

I'll tell you how it is - you're an ignoramus and a cretin.

Do not be so quick to judge. I would like Gifted Many Few to apply his obvious medical expertise to diagnose the cause of a recurring pain that I have occasionally experienced in my knee. Perhaps he will inform me that the sensation is entirely psychosomatic.


I used to have psychosomatic knee pain like you. Then I took an arrow in the knee.
 
2013-03-04 01:25:31 PM  

Gdalescrboz: Have ha ADHD my entire life, don't take meds, never will. I dont want to be medicated my whole life, only to decide one day im done being medicated and cant come off it because i dont know how to lice wirh it. If you live with it you learn to manage it, just like any "disorder." In my case, and I'm sure many others, I've made it my strength, among other thing I multi-task extremely well(can't stay on a single task though).


Same here only I recently started a job that forces me to sit at a desk and focus on a single task at a time (previous job of 10 years I thrived with the chaos)..I'm finding it really hard to do my new job..I'm almost 40 and starting meds this week for the first time. :/
 
2013-03-04 01:28:17 PM  
As a spouse of someone with ADHD and a parent of a child with ADHD who is also being evaluated for Aspbergers I am really sad to read some of the comments here.

ADHD has a very genetic component (something like 80% of kids with ADHD have an ADHD parent).  My wife got diagnosed soon after my kid.  She had spent 20 years of her adult life being fired from one job after another.  She's been on medication for five years and has been doing fantastic (glowing performance reviews, bonuses and raises).   It's so sad she spent most of her life trying to get along without it.  As a side note statistics say driving without your ADHD meds incurs the same increase in accident rate as drinking and driving.

Speaking your mind is not Aspbergers.  I have seen my son talk at another kid he has never met for a half hour straight nonstop about some hobby of his, even when asked to stop.  Even when the other kid is running away yelling 'stop talking to me' he will chase after him continuing to deliver his lecture.   Like many people with Aspbergers he has no friends.  Zero.
 
2013-03-04 01:31:27 PM  

Brittabot: I sometimes forget a thought or a request from someone WHILE I'm writing it down.


Favorite semi-memory of this:  My first appointment with a new shrink.  Shrink meets me at the door to her large, bric-a-brac-filled office and introduces herself as we shake hands.  We walk over to the couch and chair and sit down.  Her first question to me:  "What is my name?"

i260.photobucket.com

/couldn't make it out on her diploma, and she wasn't wearing a name tag
//my usual covering/coping techniques
 
2013-03-04 01:34:59 PM  

fredklein: Gary Coleman's kidneys: Really?? seriously, if that's a good description, that describes me to a T....as with with cleaning in general...I see it, I know I have to do it but I find it almost impossible until its to a point that its embarrassing.....please tell me there's a farking pill for this...it drives me crazy and has ruined relationships in the past...I would love to not be like this.

[woldfitness.com image 300x195]

It's called "dontbelazyium". I've been taking it with moderate success.


seems like you're on the wrong medication, maybe you should try "dontbeajerkalil"
 
2013-03-04 01:40:12 PM  
Here's my analogy to describe ADHD:

You know those people with OCD who can't help but constantly check that all the doors are locked, or they must wash their hands like ten thousand times a day?  Like, these repeating thoughts---"Double check the door is locked" or "I think I need to wash my hands."---distract them from their life?  That's my ADHD.  Except, instead of a single thing (e.g., doors or handwashing) keeping me distracted, it's everything.   Everything grabs your attention and there's no way to ignore it.  There's no "tuning it out" (at least for me, anyway).

ADHD is not having too little attention; it's having too much attention.
 
2013-03-04 01:49:31 PM  
Snakeophelia: I'm the inattentive type, with no more physical activity than any other kid, although the resultant anxiety disorders that resulting from feeling like I was always late, always forgetting something, and always inconsiderate took care of that soon enough.  It's incredible how much being ADD can warp your self-esteem, raise your anxiety level, and make you feel like you're always falling a step behind.Despite my host of organizing and coping behaviors to keep myself on track, I always felt "lazy, crazy, and stupid," despite earning a PhD, holding a good job, and having a happy marriage.


True for me as well.  Getting diagnosed and treated (with Adderall, *gasp*!) was the best thing to ever happen to me and my self-esteem.  Oh, and I no longer have panic attacks or anxiety issues, either.
 
2013-03-04 01:50:22 PM  

CeroX: shortymac: Aidan: shortymac: I second that, it helped my cousin out a lot. A Gluten-Free diet is helping my ADD husband as well. These diets are NOT a cure however, my Hubby still needs medication to get through the day.

Really? Hm!

My son's (new) psychiatrist mentioned gluten-free, but she also said reduced sugar, red dye, and ... God I forget what else. I did like her idea of giving him fish oil pills. Just gonna find small ones!

Might try out a week of gluten-free for the boy and see what it does.

It's actually a great help, however you'll have to check labels, etc because it's going to be hard for them to remember to do it. (With a kid it's easier, obviously) I'm still trying to get my hubby to give up coca-cola but that's hard.

My hubby says it helps makes his brain feel less "busy". Here's a interesting video about it as well:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79Y5pEv1NCs

I recommend going on Amazon and preemptively buying GF replacements for their favorite sauces and foods to make it an easier transition. For my hubby it's BBQ sauce and grilled cheese. The Schar (I think I spelled it right) brand of GF free breads and pasta tastes like the real thing.
On a side note, if you haven't already find a cognitive behavioral program for your son that focuses on ADD-friendly organization and study skills. My husband only had medication therapy and while it's a great help he was still suffering from the lack of organization that comes with ADD.

/I was on a GF diet for my IBS anyway so I was used to it
//EIP for recipes, etc.

I've never understood the hype for "Gluten Free"... The only thing i've seen on the subject is a lot of suggesting... Studies "suggest" people could be allergic to gluten and could cause fat problems, Studies "suggest" gluten leads to obesity, studies "suggest" a lot, and because of that i've heard a lot of anecdotal stories talking about how much better people's lives are without gluten...

But here's the thing

What you are talking about is ...


Personally, I don't eat GF junk food that's made with deglutenized wheat or potato and tapioca starch, that doesn't have nutrients in it and it'll spike blood sugar (I'm hypoglycemic as well, my body hates me).  If I'm baking I use Almond, Coconut, Flax, and sometimes chickpea flours instead. I've been without bread so long I don't miss it anymore.

My Hubby however, has never been on a diet before in his life (Skinny biatch) and hates cooking. Adjustment has been difficult so I find keep some GF pasta and bread around the house makes it easier and I don't have to worry about feeding him if I'm working late.

As for the GF free diet, Dr. Davis' Wheat Belly raised some interesting facts about the opiate and inflammatory effects of modern wheat.

I personally think a big component to all this talk of GF diets helping people out is blood sugars effect on the brain and body. As a hypoglycemic I KNOW how blood sugar can fark with your mood but I didn't realize it until after diagnosis.

IMHO, I wonder if there's a link between GF diet helping people and the Ketogenic diet that Doctors put seizure patients who don't respond well to medication on. I wonder if it has to deal with blood sugar levels and/or reducing energy to an "overactive" brain.
 
2013-03-04 01:56:13 PM  

Treize26: optional: ADHD strikes me as one of those illnesses that do exist, but that end up being heavily over-diagnosed. I'm very skeptical of the guy describing it as not having the willpower to take out the trash. Even in these conditions, you can muster up the willpower.

I've been diagnosed with depression. Means a lot of times, I don't want to do much more than lie on my bed and vegetate. Even so, I forced myself to go to class while at school, forced myself to engage with people socially, and currently force myself to go to work (though not today, because I'm actually running a slight fever).

I'm not going to lie: doing the above doesn't make me better or happier (barring interacting socially, which does help). Often, it makes me quite miserable. But it's simply what has to be done.

Using the trash analogy, yeah I can focus myself to make a point to do it, but doing so requires significantly more effort than you'd think it should, and that can easily be superseded by other tasks that arise in the meantime, and then other tasks supersede those, and so on.  I can spend a day solid starting tasks and not finish one.

People with ADHD aren't non-functional, it just requires a significant amount of effort to go through the day doing normal everyday things.  A more appropriate comparison with depression would be like me telling you "just stop being down".  In my non-medical opinion, depression has the secondary effect of making you not want to do anything.  ADHD makes it difficult to accomplish things, which can very easily lead to being unhappy.

I can more easily raise my spirits, you can more easily force yourself to accomplish stuff.  Neither of us can just will the root problem away.


Fair enough.
 
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