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(Vice)   Ever wonder what it's like being a social worker in the Tenderloin? "Today: 4 dead clients, 1 murdered provider, 1 client defecated in the lobby, 1 dead dog, & 1 Facebook friend posted pictures of nachos"   (vice.com) divider line 145
    More: Sad, tenderloin, social workers, harm reduction, Golden Gate Park, African-American neighborhood, substance dependence  
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12007 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2013 at 8:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-04 08:17:13 AM
Pork or beef tenderloin?

I prefer a good chuck roast myself, though...
 
2013-03-04 08:23:34 AM

FTFA: For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.


assets.vice.com


What money or drugs or death may look like.

 
2013-03-04 08:37:53 AM
I think I got into social work because I had this idea of it somehow "killing" my ego. It seems silly, but it felt very real at the time. There's a sadness to watching your idealism and convictions go to shiat. Not to mention that working in such a thankless and farked system will kill a sacred part of you. I feel tired. For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.

And this is exhibit A of "Why do we keep trying to help them?"

We shouldn't.

If anything, the state has been complicit in assisting these peoples' suicides. It should stop.
 
2013-03-04 08:43:00 AM

Generation_D: I think I got into social work because I had this idea of it somehow "killing" my ego. It seems silly, but it felt very real at the time. There's a sadness to watching your idealism and convictions go to shiat. Not to mention that working in such a thankless and farked system will kill a sacred part of you. I feel tired. For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.

And this is exhibit A of "Why do we keep trying to help them?"

We shouldn't.

If anything, the state has been complicit in assisting these peoples' suicides. It should stop.


This person had dumb ideas before pursuing a terrible job. Why should I listen to their ideas now? If anything, this person has proven that they should be ignored.
 
2013-03-04 08:43:52 AM
I'd like to tenderize her loins, if you know what I'm saying

/And I think you do
//Also, major props for working in a place like that
 
2013-03-04 08:44:15 AM
I'm too lazy to post the link but do a google search for 'crack whores of the tenderloin'.

Of course it's NSFW why would you even have to ask?

/I'm apologize in advance
 
2013-03-04 08:46:10 AM

xanadian: Pork or beef tenderloin?

I prefer a good chuck roast myself, though...


Yeah, what the fark is Tenderloin in the context of the headline?

I think it's a part of San Francisco, but I'm not sure. I just happen to know that - or think I know that, but I'm not sure. I'm guessing from the headline it's not a very good part of SF. Come to think of it, I'm not sure there are any good parts of SF. I've heard of Tenderloin (where people show up dead or murdered), Castro (where the gay people live NTTAWWT) and the Mission district ("walkin' along in the Mission, in the rain) where some guy missing part of his finger grew up, but I hear that's not a great place either.

/never been to Frisco, obviously - and I call it Frisco because I gather it pisses off the people who actually live in SF. (and it's shorter)
 
2013-03-04 08:47:03 AM
The area needs more hipsters. Look at Brooklyn now. It's safe, business is booming, and there are plenty of young, monied white kids.

I call it hipsternomics. As the number of hipsters grows, the demand for shops and restaurants follows. And since hipsters draw the line at marijuana, the percentage of the population that is drug addicted drops.

Hipsters, while seemingly nothing more than wastes of cheap beer and suspenders, are actually a key cornerstone to the revival of depressed economies.
 
2013-03-04 08:50:47 AM

Generation_D: I think I got into social work because I had this idea of it somehow "killing" my ego. It seems silly, but it felt very real at the time. There's a sadness to watching your idealism and convictions go to shiat. Not to mention that working in such a thankless and farked system will kill a sacred part of you. I feel tired. For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.

And this is exhibit A of "Why do we keep trying to help them?"

We shouldn't.

If anything, the state has been complicit in assisting these peoples' suicides. It should stop.


Only reason it shouldn't stop is that instead of waiting in a social services line to get their crack money, they'll be knifing you while you walk your dog to get their crack money.
 
2013-03-04 08:51:03 AM
My good friend's wife was a social worker, she ended up leaving that job to work in a prison as the the prison was less depressing.
 
2013-03-04 08:53:02 AM
She knows she is, she knows she's going. Down below where the fire's glowing. Tenderloin. Tenderloin. Tenderloin.
 
2013-03-04 08:53:33 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: The area needs more hipsters. Look at Brooklyn now. It's safe, business is booming, and there are plenty of young, monied white kids.

I call it hipsternomics. As the number of hipsters grows, the demand for shops and restaurants follows. And since hipsters draw the line at marijuana, the percentage of the population that is drug addicted drops.

Hipsters, while seemingly nothing more than wastes of cheap beer and suspenders, are actually a key cornerstone to the revival of depressed economies.


It doesn't solve the people, they just end up in Camden or something.
 
2013-03-04 09:00:18 AM
Well, that was depressing.
 
2013-03-04 09:00:21 AM
I think I got into social work because I had this idea of it somehow "killing" my ego. It seems silly, but it felt very real at the time. There's a sadness to watching your idealism and convictions go to shiat. Not to mention that working in such a thankless and farked system will kill a sacred part of you. I feel tired. For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.

Hi there! Welcome to working in the public sector. Your number one single piece of advice that will help you transition through time in your life as we crush your soul?

Start drinking heavily
 
2013-03-04 09:11:12 AM

YixilTesiphon: AverageAmericanGuy: The area needs more hipsters. Look at Brooklyn now. It's safe, business is booming, and there are plenty of young, monied white kids.

I call it hipsternomics. As the number of hipsters grows, the demand for shops and restaurants follows. And since hipsters draw the line at marijuana, the percentage of the population that is drug addicted drops.

Hipsters, while seemingly nothing more than wastes of cheap beer and suspenders, are actually a key cornerstone to the revival of depressed economies.

It doesn't solve the people, they just end up in Camden or something.


It's a local solution, granted. However, if the government made hipsterization a priority, a coordinated plan to drive the undesirables toward Detroit could save our cities.
 
2013-03-04 09:11:21 AM
The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.
 
2013-03-04 09:13:27 AM

enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.


You'd think that.  But it never does.
 
2013-03-04 09:15:05 AM

Generation_D: And this is exhibit A of "Why do we keep trying to help them?" We shouldn't.


SubBass49: Only reason it shouldn't stop is that instead of waiting in a social services line to get their crack money, they'll be knifing you while you walk your dog to get their crack money.


Exactly.  Welfare is a very cheap insurance policy.  If they don't get their handouts, they'll go up the hill like bandits.  Rich idiots see their taxes pay for drug habits and think it's all a waste of money.  Well OK it is, but the Drug War has turned out to be a far more expensive way to deal with the same problem.

Thing is, even the crack addict who shiats himself knows not to kill the golden goose.  It's nice to know that a schizophrenic drug-addled pants-shiatter has more common sense than Wall Street.  No, wait, it isn't.
 
2013-03-04 09:15:59 AM
If you think this was depressing, try being a public school teacher that serves a neighborhood like that.  Then imagine that these same people are the "parents" of the children you teach, and that sometimes the kids fall down that mineshaft of human existence right alongside them.

(have already caught 3 kids dealing drugs this school year in my classroom)

And with that I'm off to work!
 
2013-03-04 09:16:52 AM
*reads headline*

And a partridge in a peaaaar treeeeee
 
2013-03-04 09:18:46 AM
What did she expect? For all the crap social workers are given, it ain't easy. The hours are long, the pay isn't that great, and you're faced with the inhumanity that individuals can do to others and themselves on a daily basis. If you're lucky, you can get a job doing clinical work for hausfraus and uptight businessmen who are a bit down because the Benz blew a tire, and it took AAA 30 minutes to get there and get it fixed.

Most social workers aren't that lucky. The majority work at non-profits dealing with the discarded, the refuse, the forgotten. They are confronted by that inhumanity on a daily basis. That takes a toll on you, and if you aren't affected, you're either lying or need to get out of the business. If one gets into the field with delusions of grandeur that they are going to stroll in and save the world, they're in for a rude awakening. I have yet to meet one social worker that has saved anyone. The only person that can do that is the individual. And that my friends, is a hellish road. But that road doesn't need to be walked alone.

What's a social worker? We're guides. We're Sherpas. We're the people that walk with the individual on that road, creating the opportunities for that person to get to the destination, and hopefully teach them how to do it themselves. Every so often, someone will get to the top, and realize it's a helluva view.  Will it kill a part of you? Absolutely. That's just an occupational hazard. What this individual hasn't figured out is there is no big victory, no fanfare or homecoming parade. It's the little victories. Like the guy who brought here the picture of the tree. It's the guy saying "I'm holding steady today." Every so often, you get the best words in the world. "Hey, I'm ok now, and I don't think I need you anymore." Awesome. Mission complete. On to the next.
 
2013-03-04 09:19:16 AM
My God, she's Audrey Tautou level of pretty.
 
2013-03-04 09:22:39 AM
Every city has hell holes. Smart cities figured out a way to corral them all into one place and keep the tourists away. I wish Winnipeg could figure that out so half the place wasn't ridden by bums.
 
2013-03-04 09:22:48 AM

xanadian: FTFA: For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.
[assets.vice.com image 426x568]
What money or drugs or death may look like.


I had copied that quote for my post but you beat me to it.

That said, if she only makes 32k in S.F., she probably has to live in one of those 'residential' hotels.  God, what a depressing line of work.
 
2013-03-04 09:23:28 AM

airsupport: enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.

You'd think that.  But it never does.


Damn right. But I'm a big fan of the Spartans at Thermopylae. I'm a sucker for lost causes. Never retreat, never surrender.

So enik, with all due love, care, and respect: FARK YOU. Just because you're too damn weak to give a shiat, doesn't mean I want to be one of those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.
 
2013-03-04 09:28:52 AM
To the social workers out there:

Why are people who won't save themselves worth saving?

Don't quote crap like I'm paying you to prevent them from mugging me, that is ridiculous. Most of these farkwits you see being homeless can barely function. If anything it seems like maintaining their habits is just helping them on a slow road to where they're going to go eventually.

So why do it?

The thing is, I have lived in urban neighborhoods for over 20 years. Old guy alert: It didn't used to be this bad. But by preventing the drugged out and the drunk from killing themselves quickly with their habits of choice, you've created whole entire areas that are open-air psych wards.

It isn't working, and its stressing you guys out too.
 
2013-03-04 09:29:36 AM

dragonchild: Thing is, even the crack addict who shiats himself knows not to kill the golden goose. It's nice to know that a schizophrenic drug-addled pants-shiatter has more common sense than Wall Street. No, wait, it isn't.


To be fair most Wall Street traders have the same blood toxicity as that hobo on the corner
 
2013-03-04 09:31:23 AM
FTFA: Why are my clients so farked up? Traumatic backgrounds, PTSD, and severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia are the most frequent cases we see). And whenever you combine a drug habit with compromised mental health, you usually get a mess of a brain.

Is the NRA still in favor of proper psychiatric care?
 
2013-03-04 09:32:01 AM
"today: 4 dead clients, 1 murdered provider, 1 client defecated in the lobby, 1 dead dog, & 1 facebook friend posted pictures of nachos."


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2013-03-04 09:40:28 AM
The article appears to be a statement of the way things are in that district. What is unbelievable is the comments below the article trashing the stater of said facts.
 
2013-03-04 09:44:31 AM
I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit
 
2013-03-04 09:46:52 AM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: FTFA: Why are my clients so farked up? Traumatic backgrounds, PTSD, and severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia are the most frequent cases we see). And whenever you combine a drug habit with compromised mental health, you usually get a mess of a brain.

Is the NRA still in favor of proper psychiatric care?


Not a member of the NRA, but someone who has known people with severe mental health issues.

If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with. We closed down the institutions in the name of humanity and this was the real world result.

People like these described once received medical and psychiatric care as well as having a roof over their head and meals to eat. Their quality of life was far higher than today.

We need to open the institutions, run them humanely, get people like these off the street and make psychiatric care readily available. We can do all of this to take care of our own without trampling on second amendment rights.
 
2013-03-04 09:47:56 AM

fnordest: The article appears to be a statement of the way things are in that district. What is unbelievable is the comments below the article trashing the stater of said facts.


Facts get in the way of anonymous forum poster's various opinions. Best thing Fark ever did was allow the ignore. That way the trolls still get to bleat, but everyone else can carry on.

Most forums are just basically troll v troll nowadays, if they aren't heavily modded, and that gets into its own issues.
 
2013-03-04 09:48:36 AM
Yeah, so where are all the "legalize drugs" cheerleaders now?
 
2013-03-04 09:54:31 AM

Generation_D: you've created whole entire areas that are open-air psych wards.


Has it occured to you that the problem has gotten a LOT worse since the government got rid of "closed-air" psych wards?  Lots of people who used to be institutionalized and cared for are now left to their own devices.  Even people that wouldn't require institutionalization are left high and dry by a pathetic excuse for a mental health regime and they self-medicate themselves into oblivion.
 
2013-03-04 09:56:09 AM

stonent: Yeah, so where are all the "legalize drugs" cheerleaders now?


If drugs were legal we'd still have idiots that couldn't use them without leaving their stinking rotting bodies lying around on other peoples property. Same as we have now. Only for two big differences: 1) gangs wouldnt control distribution, and 2) it would be less of a shame-based issue to deal with addictions, and more of a medical-based issue.

We'd still have the incompetent f-ups who couldn't hold a job but kept drinking and drugging. But there wouldn't be the threat of prison involved in the cleanup. Just .. get you some medicine now off you go.

But then the following entities would be out of work:

- Criminal defense attorneys
- 3/4 of the prison beds in America
- Most large drug gangs
- Major dent in the pharmaceutical industry's profits, since most illegal drugs are more in demand than legal ones.
- Criminal prosecution industry, all those DA's with less work than now
- DEA disbanded and all their mission-creep into civil rights gone overnight
- Various other alphabet agencies whose job involves spying on Americans to find drug trafficking, gone


Pretty impressive list. Now imagine out of all these how many of them have lobbyists and profit significantly from the status quo of today.

If we ended the drug war, we'd have money to help those that really needed help, and to do so properly. Not the infinite band-aids we have now, that results in drugged out and drunk people sleeping on streets regularly in every city in America, or filling up prisons, or feeding this vast array of government like DEA and FBI investigations.
 
2013-03-04 09:58:41 AM

onyxruby: Lee Jackson Beauregard: FTFA: Why are my clients so farked up? Traumatic backgrounds, PTSD, and severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia are the most frequent cases we see). And whenever you combine a drug habit with compromised mental health, you usually get a mess of a brain.

Is the NRA still in favor of proper psychiatric care?

Not a member of the NRA, but someone who has known people with severe mental health issues.

If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with. We closed down the institutions in the name of humanity and this was the real world result.

People like these described once received medical and psychiatric care as well as having a roof over their head and meals to eat. Their quality of life was far higher than today.

We need to open the institutions, run them humanely, get people like these off the street and make psychiatric care readily available. We can do all of this to take care of our own without trampling on second amendment rights.


No, to be specific, Reagan closed down the institutions because he was cheap, thoughtless, and wanted his rich donors that ran private facilities to get even richer.

It didn't take long for those people to max-out their potential benefit and then they would spend the rest of their lives bouncing from the streets to jail/prison.
 
2013-03-04 09:59:41 AM

Civchic: Generation_D: you've created whole entire areas that are open-air psych wards.

Has it occured to you that the problem has gotten a LOT worse since the government got rid of "closed-air" psych wards?  Lots of people who used to be institutionalized and cared for are now left to their own devices.  Even people that wouldn't require institutionalization are left high and dry by a pathetic excuse for a mental health regime and they self-medicate themselves into oblivion.


Its occurred to me daily. I have lived for 25 years in or near the same areas that the rest of America sends its pathetic and addicted to come sleep. Streets I have seen degrade for 20 years used to never have people sleeping in doorways that now do.

I cannot understand why we open clinics to attract the addicted. It is only perpetuating their addiction. I would be fully in favor of hospital care, but nobody wants to pay for that, we're too busy paying for prison care instead.
 
2013-03-04 10:01:44 AM
FTA: When you're young, you can afford to have ideals and believe in stuff, and think that what you're doing matters, but after watching grown men shiat themselves and sometimes try to eat their own shiat, not to mention the countless number of times I've had to pick people off the floor and put them back in their wheelchairs because they've been drinking since 6 AM and can't even sit up straight, your measly 32K salary starts to matter a helluva lot more than social justice.

32K?  Cripes.  I can't decide whether to feel smug or guilty.
 
2013-03-04 10:02:09 AM

stonent: Yeah, so where are all the "legalize drugs" cheerleaders now?


I'm sorry, we spent the weekend trying to figure out how to get the mentally ill the help they need.  Was there something you needed?
 
2013-03-04 10:04:14 AM

onyxruby: If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with. We closed down the institutions in the name of humanity and this was the real world result.

People like these described once received medical and psychiatric care as well as having a roof over their head and meals to eat. Their quality of life was far higher than today.

We need to open the institutions, run them humanely, get people like these off the street and make psychiatric care readily available. We can do all of this to take care of our own without trampling on second amendment rights.


The lack of humaneness of these institutions is what got them shut down in the first place.  Which means that's the trick to the thing, because otherwise most people are going to think the kind of people that would need these places are better off on the street.
 
2013-03-04 10:07:43 AM

Raithun: FTA: When you're young, you can afford to have ideals and believe in stuff, and think that what you're doing matters, but after watching grown men shiat themselves and sometimes try to eat their own shiat, not to mention the countless number of times I've had to pick people off the floor and put them back in their wheelchairs because they've been drinking since 6 AM and can't even sit up straight, your measly 32K salary starts to matter a helluva lot more than social justice.

32K?  Cripes.  I can't decide whether to feel smug or guilty.


Shake your head at peoples life choices, about all you can do really. I can't understand why someone would go get an $80,000 degree to work in a $32,000 job, and a thankless one full of stress at that.
 
2013-03-04 10:07:45 AM

Rapmaster2000: Generation_D: I think I got into social work because I had this idea of it somehow "killing" my ego. It seems silly, but it felt very real at the time. There's a sadness to watching your idealism and convictions go to shiat. Not to mention that working in such a thankless and farked system will kill a sacred part of you. I feel tired. For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.

And this is exhibit A of "Why do we keep trying to help them?"

We shouldn't.

If anything, the state has been complicit in assisting these peoples' suicides. It should stop.

This person had dumb ideas before pursuing a terrible job. Why should I listen to their ideas now? If anything, this person has proven that they should be ignored.


Probably because this woman is part of the line holding 'these people' away from your world.  If anything, she's akin to a soldier fighting the war 'there' so that the enemy doesn't show up on your doorstep.

/analogy may be weak
//but holy hell what would happen if she (and others like her) weren't there
 
2013-03-04 10:10:19 AM
FTA: It's literally located at the bottom of a giant hill (Nob Hill), where the old money sits and looks down on the poor black folk, so the geography of SF's class structure is more blatant than in other cities, I think.

Yeah, that's a classic pattern of economic inequality. Black people live at a lower elevation than white people in almost every city in America. SF isn't more blatant, it just has steeper hills.
 
2013-03-04 10:10:37 AM

madgonad: onyxruby: Lee Jackson Beauregard: FTFA: Why are my clients so farked up? Traumatic backgrounds, PTSD, and severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia are the most frequent cases we see). And whenever you combine a drug habit with compromised mental health, you usually get a mess of a brain.

Is the NRA still in favor of proper psychiatric care?

Not a member of the NRA, but someone who has known people with severe mental health issues.

If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with. We closed down the institutions in the name of humanity and this was the real world result.

People like these described once received medical and psychiatric care as well as having a roof over their head and meals to eat. Their quality of life was far higher than today.

We need to open the institutions, run them humanely, get people like these off the street and make psychiatric care readily available. We can do all of this to take care of our own without trampling on second amendment rights.

No, to be specific, Reagan closed down the institutions because he was cheap, thoughtless, and wanted his rich donors that ran private facilities to get even richer.

It didn't take long for those people to max-out their potential benefit and then they would spend the rest of their lives bouncing from the streets to jail/prison.


Jimmy Carter closed down the institutions. Ronald Reagan went after the mental health money.

There is more than enough blame to go around without playing partisan politics. You'll notice I talked about fixing things instead of blaming people.
 
2013-03-04 10:16:52 AM
from TFA:

"Then we check our voicemail. Twenty messages from the same two or three clients who either scream their financial requests over and over, simply sit there and breathe, or tell you that witches are under their beds waiting for the next blood sacrifice."

Well, that's what happens when you give your voice number to Boehner's office.  Really, you should have expected this.
 
2013-03-04 10:18:57 AM
"For I was hungry, and you gave Me something to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave Me something to drink; I was a stranger, and you invited Me in; naked, and you clothed Me; I was sick, and you visited Me; I was in prison, and you came to Me."

It's truly disheartening that we can't find a little more for those who work so hard for those who do not, and may not ever be able to thank them. That people lucky enough to have never worried about a roof over their heads or food on the table cannot muster any compassion and justify it in every way possible. It's the little people like this, fighting every day to hold back the tide that give us hope. They save lives and families.
 
2013-03-04 10:27:10 AM

IlGreven: The lack of humaneness of these institutions is what got them shut down in the first place. Which means that's the trick to the thing, because otherwise most people are going to think the kind of people that would need these places are better off on the street.


I won't argue there were some bad apples, there were some very bad apples indeed. Unfortunately instead of picking out the bad apples and cleaning the places up we instead went with the concept of community based treatment centers.

This forgot the socioeconomic realities that economies of scale allowed treatment to occur in the institutions that otherwise never would occur at all. The result has been a disaster resulting in decades of stories like the one described in the article.

We threw the baby out with the bathwater and it's time for society to step up to the plate and actually do something about it. Until we we're only going to see decades more of stories like the ones cited above. There is nothing human about what were doing now and it's a cycle in desperate need of breaking.
 
2013-03-04 10:32:08 AM

megarian: I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit


Welcome to hell. Fear not, you will not be alone. It's one of the most soul-crushing, but at the same time, most rewarding fields you could get into.
 
2013-03-04 10:33:22 AM
And I came to learn some good tenderloin receipes....

Hmmmm, as long as its beef tenderloin, well trimmed and nicely marbled....

Oh, wait....

what?

wow, I missed that un......

this stab at humor will undoubtedly offend some but what is a middle aged while middle class guy, GOING to say that has any meaning about such an article?
 
2013-03-04 10:35:07 AM

Generation_D: I cannot understand why we open clinics to attract the addicted. It is only perpetuating their addiction.


The problem as I see it is, we think we can cure addiction, while all we can really do is shift an addiction.

CSB:

A friend was an addict (cocaine) when he decided to quit he went through all the programs narcanon etc.  He told me all narcanon did was make you addicted to meetings instead of cocaine, he said it was better, but he realized he would always be addicted to something.  Now he restores radios (I do as well that is how we met) from the 1920s-1950s that is his addiction, he told me he gets the same rush when he finds a rare radio and then finally gets it working as he did with cocaine.  So he is still an addict just a non-self destructive socially acceptable addict.

/CSB
 
2013-03-04 10:39:07 AM
Once upon a time I was a psychiatric social worker in the Bay Area.

I got the MSW degree. I worked at a halfway house, a county hospital's ER, a residential treatment program/school for severely emotionally disturbed children, and a community mental health clinic.

Now I'm a software developer. The money's better and I don't want to kill myself (as much).
 
2013-03-04 10:42:08 AM

enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.


Ah yes, let all the conservative Christians laugh at the naive liberal doing God's work.

/not like Jesus ever got criticized for spending all his time helping the bottom of society.
 
2013-03-04 10:42:23 AM
the tenderloin is a shiathole.

and yet, because its SF, it will still cost you $1500 a month to rent a studio apartment.

whether the tenderloin is better or worse than Oakland is unknown to me
 
2013-03-04 10:44:40 AM

Tom_Slick: Generation_D: I cannot understand why we open clinics to attract the addicted. It is only perpetuating their addiction.

The problem as I see it is, we think we can cure addiction, while all we can really do is shift an addiction.

CSB:

A friend was an addict (cocaine) when he decided to quit he went through all the programs narcanon etc.  He told me all narcanon did was make you addicted to meetings instead of cocaine, he said it was better, but he realized he would always be addicted to something.  Now he restores radios (I do as well that is how we met) from the 1920s-1950s that is his addiction, he told me he gets the same rush when he finds a rare radio and then finally gets it working as he did with cocaine.  So he is still an addict just a non-self destructive socially acceptable addict.

/CSB


a member of my family traded his cocaine addiction for an ebay addiction. $20k in debt later......ugh
 
2013-03-04 10:50:00 AM

megarian: I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit


I was going to post: Welcome to Detroit, but you are already here.  Enjoy.

SubBass49: If you think this was depressing, try being a public school teacher that serves a neighborhood like that.  Then imagine that these same people are the "parents" of the children you teach, and that sometimes the kids fall down that mineshaft of human existence right alongside them.

(have already caught 3 kids dealing drugs this school year in my classroom)

And with that I'm off to work!


Oh woe is you, since you are the one who follows up with home visits and the like.  No, oh that is right teachers call social workers and the police to take over.  Chances are, you're only guessing about their home life since you haven't actually seen it.  I had a teacher make a false call on me once, the CPS worker was surprised to see our house was clean and nice.  It's nice not having my kids around judgmental  educators anymore.

(even upscale areas having drug dealing in schools)
 
2013-03-04 10:50:45 AM
There was a time when most of these people were institutionalized:
www.richardavedon.com

While there certainly were many abuses and problems with the old system, it seems better than letting the disturbed, psychotic, or mentally inept wander the streets, begging for handouts, and dying in the cold. Instead of confronting the problem, we choose to look away and ignore it.

static.igossip.com

teamowens313.files.wordpress.com

As a society, we hardly blink an eye when we spend hundreds of billions to bomb other nations, yet we can't provide basic care for those who can't take care of themselves. We can do better.
 
2013-03-04 10:53:26 AM

Generation_D: Shake your head at peoples life choices, about all you can do really. I can't understand why someone would go get an $80,000 degree to work in a $32,000 job, and a thankless one full of stress at that


It's not like they have a choice. Universities, like a cancer, have metastatized into every facet of society. You want a 16$ an hour job? You need a bachelor's degree. It's not that you actually *need* it, or that you will use anything you have learned in real life, or that you can't learn that same stuff for free (libraries have been around for how many thousands of years?), it's that you need a degree because everyone else has one.

Sounds harmless until you run some number$. University is just a business like any other, with public relations and profit motives.

Universities run a private profit and socialize the debt.
 
2013-03-04 10:56:24 AM

organizmx: enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.

Ah yes, let all the conservative Christians laugh at the naive liberal doing God's work.

/not like Jesus ever got criticized for spending all his time helping the bottom of society.


Most xtians don't really believe what they would lead you to think they believe.
 
2013-03-04 10:58:46 AM

MrSteve007: Instead of confronting the problem, we choose to look away and ignore it.


Yeah but it's cheaper and Jersey Shore is on now.
/That last picture was like a gut punch, and I thought I was jaded...
 
2013-03-04 10:59:02 AM
Interesting to see and try and figure out "who is right" here. One side says, these are the people who we prop up with our tax dollars, some even going further to suggest that the problem is made worse by liberal policies. The other side is incensed with the interviewed social worker's callousness, indicating that she should move aside and allow someone with a bigger heart and kinder disposition to fill her shoes, some going further to say that she is wrong in exposing her clientele to the public eye (breaking some vow of trust).

I'm going to rely on the what the article said rather than what people think the article should have said, treating the points made as facts as best as the interviewee saw them.

She didn't out anyone specifically, so there was no breach of confidentiality. Her client base is too large to be able to guess whom she's talking about. So speaking in generalities, she was speaking truth to what is going on. Showing light to a troubled area should be noteworthy, not frowned upon. Oddly, even though she has little faith in her client base, she talks about them with more honesty and sympathy than you might expect. She specifically mentions that the conditions are horrible, and she can see why clients would rather be homeless. She specifically mentions that her clients have mental health issues related to very bad circumstances in life, and being poor and unwell, they turn to drugs, which sadly makes it worse.

Nowhere does she say they should all starve or be homeless, which is what the conservative-minded here seem to be implying - stop giving them money that feeds their addiction; you're only making it worse. And then what? They'll magically get jobs? Move back in with long-lost relatives so that they're not a burden on society? It's either that, or just watch them starve in the street. What I got from this is that we structurally don't know what to do with the mentally ill. From the article's commenters, who rightly say there are plenty of the sane homeless who are helped out by social services, you can see that our system does indeed help, and probably helps a majority leave their bad circumstances. But those who are chronically dependent are not helped. The best that happens is we maintain their living conditions until the bottom falls out for them (death). Maybe that's it. Maybe they can't be helped out of it. But it's sad that we can't figure out how to help the mentally ill in this country.
 
2013-03-04 11:00:29 AM
What a social worker might look like:

i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-04 11:12:51 AM

I'm an Egyptian!: megarian: I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit

Welcome to hell. Fear not, you will not be alone. It's one of the most soul-crushing, but at the same time, most rewarding fields you could get into.


My internship has been pretty difficult, shocking, and sad...

...but also extremely awesome, humbling, and rewarding.

Thank you for kind words. Much appreciated :)
 
2013-03-04 11:23:42 AM

JohnnyApocalypse: From the article's commenters, who rightly say there are plenty of the sane homeless who are helped out by social services, you can see that our system does indeed help, and probably helps a majority leave their bad circumstances. But those who are chronically dependent are not helped. The best that happens is we maintain their living conditions until the bottom falls out for them (death). Maybe that's it. Maybe they can't be helped out of it. But it's sad that we can't figure out how to help the mentally ill in this country.


For the most part, the homeless can be broken down into four categories:

-The financial down & outs. People who lost their job or hit with a major medical problem & bills. They're actively trying to get back on their feet, find jobs, housing and re-enter society.
-The addicted. Drugs or alcohol ruined their life, so they fully embrace their addictions. Frequently addicted women as prostitutes.
-The mentally-ill. These are the people who aren't able to take care of themselves or hold jobs. Often, they're deranged or schizophrenic. A small subset are former military. Addiction may also be an added problem.
-Tramps, vagabonds, and teen runaways. Mentally stable people who choose the lifestyle and don't want to fit into society. Teens may turn to additions, and likely would have let because of abuse.

I fully believe that if we made a real effort to reduce homelessness, we'd properly fund separate programs that address the separate above groups (with exception to the tamps and vagabonds, they're free to live the way they want). Each should be regarded as a separate population, with very specific needs and issues. Frankly, the program aimed to help people find housing and jobs shouldn't be the same one who tries to counsel of someone who eats their own excrement and thinks they hear Satan talking in their head, or have to work with people who are tripping out on meth or acid.
 
2013-03-04 11:24:17 AM

organizmx: enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.

Ah yes, let all the conservative Christians laugh at the naive liberal doing God's work.

/not like Jesus ever got criticized for spending all his time helping the bottom of society.


I don't see where laughing at anyone in CPS, is going to help anyone.  I get your point about conservatives and it is noted, but I see CPS simply someone who took the worse job possible(regardless if they are liberal or not).  Teachers pass problems onto them, the police are only involved for a short time when they have to.  CPS has to follow up with the case until either the child is no longer in danger or no longer a child.  They see the worse part of their community day in and day out and it is their job to try and fix it.  If you are to call yourself Christian, you should get yourself involved in those with needs.  My wife and I are trying to help a young single mom who doesn't know the basic parenting skills.  Her own mom doesn't help her and her grandmother asked us to help because she is a RN who puts in 48-60 hrs a week and can't keep up with her.  We got her to understand basic feeding beyond just bottle feeding, now we are trying to work on getting her to step out of mom's house and be a strong adult on her own.  Her mom only taught her to find a man and all will be well, which is why she has two kids by different men in less than two years and is now seeing a married man that already had his kids taken from him.  We want to prevent CPS from having to deal with this, they have enough on their plate.  I have seen people that I wished I could've helped, but I wasn't in the position to do anything.  I am now and I want to see it through.  Christian, but I really don't care about conservative or liberal political views.
 
2013-03-04 11:26:17 AM

Cold_Sassy: xanadian: FTFA: For the most part, people do not want help. They want money or they want drugs or they want death.
[assets.vice.com image 426x568]
What money or drugs or death may look like.

I had copied that quote for my post but you beat me to it.

That said, if she only makes 32k in S.F., she probably has to live in one of those 'residential' hotels.  God, what a depressing line of work.


But, hey, $32k for social work, GOBMINT OVERSPEDNING HURR
 
2013-03-04 11:26:20 AM

Happy Hours: xanadian: Pork or beef tenderloin?

I prefer a good chuck roast myself, though...

Yeah, what the fark is Tenderloin in the context of the headline?

I think it's a part of San Francisco, but I'm not sure. I just happen to know that - or think I know that, but I'm not sure. I'm guessing from the headline it's not a very good part of SF. Come to think of it, I'm not sure there are any good parts of SF. I've heard of Tenderloin (where people show up dead or murdered), Castro (where the gay people live NTTAWWT) and the Mission district ("walkin' along in the Mission, in the rain) where some guy missing part of his finger grew up, but I hear that's not a great place either.

/never been to Frisco, obviously - and I call it Frisco because I gather it pisses off the people who actually live in SF. (and it's shorter)


It's all of San Francisco.
 
2013-03-04 11:33:22 AM

JohnnyApocalypse: Interesting to see and try and figure out "who is right" here. One side says, these are the people who we prop up with our tax dollars, some even going further to suggest that the problem is made worse by liberal policies. The other side is incensed with the interviewed social worker's callousness, indicating that she should move aside and allow someone with a bigger heart and kinder disposition to fill her shoes, some going further to say that she is wrong in exposing her clientele to the public eye (breaking some vow of trust).


I read this as a subset of the population who interprets urban poverty and severe mental illness as somehow part of the world's beautiful diversity, a culture that should be respected and loved. If you disagree with the way things are and don't like stepping on broken needles on your way to work, "go back to suburbia".

As I see it, she isn't really judging the people, she's judging the situation, and it needs judgment. People left out in the cold eating their own feces, transgender prostitutes working for drugs, people dying in alleys, this is "farked up". It's not marginalizing or stigmatizing to call it out. A lot of these people are condemned to lives of fear, misery, indignity. "Go back to suburbia" is the same as saying "leave them for dead". "Keep this to yourself" is the same as saying "let them suffer in silence". Callousness may not help, either, but it's an understandable reaction after years of numbing exposure to it, and "understanding" from people with bigger hearts won't change anything, either. Anger and disgust might actually motivate people to do something.
 
2013-03-04 11:43:02 AM
But ... but ... it is Sate policy we must give away your money to Other People.  We  must.  WE MUST MUST MUST
 
2013-03-04 11:45:15 AM

megarian: I'm an Egyptian!: megarian: I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit

Welcome to hell. Fear not, you will not be alone. It's one of the most soul-crushing, but at the same time, most rewarding fields you could get into.

My internship has been pretty difficult, shocking, and sad...

...but also extremely awesome, humbling, and rewarding.

Thank you for kind words. Much appreciated :)


Glad to hear it. Just don't fall into the trap that you can save anyone. They're the only ones that can. All we do is create the circumstances to allow them to do that. It's like gardening. They give you the seed. You plant it, fertilize it, water, and do whatever you can to make it grow. In places like Detroit and other places, the soil sucks. It's all concrete, depleted soil, harsh climate, and easy to get trampled. But every so often, that seed you plant finds a way in the cracks, manages to scrape up the meager nutrients that are there, and starts to grow. If you're really lucky, you notice it isn't just growing, but it's flourishing. Every so often, you find a rose growing out of the concrete. If you can take a mental snapshot of that, and nuture it in your own mind, it helps to keep your head up amid the despair.

One of my old Zen teachers told me to be a Bodhisattva.Specifically, one of the ones that forsakes their own enlightenment to guide others along the way. In a way, that's what a social worker is. A Bodhisattva. We stand amid the muck so we can get others to climb out. Just be sure to take care of yourself along the way. Good luck to you. If you need anything, EIP.
 
2013-03-04 11:45:24 AM

Generation_D: you've created whole entire areas that are open-air psych wards.


That's not the fault of the psych workers, it's the fault of Regan closing the inpatient psychiatric hospitals in the 60
s-70s and not funding community care models.
 
2013-03-04 11:51:44 AM

calm like a bomb: organizmx: enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.

Ah yes, let all the conservative Christians laugh at the naive liberal doing God's work.

/not like Jesus ever got criticized for spending all his time helping the bottom of society.

Most xtians don't really believe what they would lead you to think they believe.


Yeah, even in a strong church, a lot of people are still 'in process'.  30 to 40% 'Know Jesus' and are doing his work.  The rest know about Jesus and are hoping for a 'prosperity gospel.' it seems.

Our church works alongside social workers when we travel downtown to look for homeless.  We meet with agencies, divide up the encampments and look for individuals.  We can break through with individuals and the workers are good at arranging housing and services.  We develop trust with the homeless and pass the trust along to the agencies.  That said, some of the social workers are Christian.

Our church usually has drunk, homeless, methadone patients, etc... Every once in a while, someone walks in bleeding.  We bandage people, do triage, feed, clothe and direct them to agencies.  But we're a small church.  40 people tops.  We're aware that we're probably not going to be a church that most people will bring their families to.

It's hard too.  We realize that we're not going to save everybody from their condition.  There's been a bunch of successes.  A guy finally gets housed after 12 years.  Another guy gives up drinking and gets a job and a place to live.  Another guy reconciles with his family & goes home to his kids.  Another guy has been outdoors for 27 years, he's likely not going to come inside.  Some folks are just used to it and prefer to live outside now.  I'm not a fan of warehousing someone just cause they think different.

Plus too, some folks are on housing lists with years long wait lists.  A lot of the housing they can afford with help is still disgusting.  Some guys have housing but won't live in it because of the filth.  Some folks that desperately want to live indoors don't fit the programs available.  There just isn't funding for some.

Just about everybody seems to do it out of love. But some workers have been doing it too long.  They've become hostile to the clients.  A lot of clients have some f'ed up behaviors and get banned out of shelters too.  You've got to love a guy and a girl even though you know they've beaten someone else you know with rebar.  You've got to love the people who are difficult to love.

You can't save everybody.  Doesn't mean you shouldn't try.
 
2013-03-04 11:55:09 AM

xanadian: Pork or beef tenderloin?


Happy Hours: Yeah, what the fark is Tenderloin in the context of the headline?


The Tenderloin is the part of San Francisco where the most down-on-their-luck people live. They aren't just living on the streets, but they're also in the fleabag hotels in the area. If you're from out of town, looking for drugs or a prostitute, and not particularly concerned about quality or safety (or whether your prostitute has a penis) that's where you go. And it's really quite convenient to the downtown business district.

One story is that district got the name because the cops that used to work in the Tenderloin could afford better cuts of meat...either through bribery or hazard pay for working the dangerous part of town. Another story is it is called the Tenderloin because it's the underbelly of the city.
 
2013-03-04 11:57:55 AM

MrSteve007: There was a time when most of these people were institutionalized:
[www.richardavedon.com image 850x519]

While there certainly were many abuses and problems with the old system, it seems better than letting the disturbed, psychotic, or mentally inept wander the streets, begging for handouts, and dying in the cold. Instead of confronting the problem, we choose to look away and ignore it.

[static.igossip.com image 550x440]

[teamowens313.files.wordpress.com image 620x408]

As a society, we hardly blink an eye when we spend hundreds of billions to bomb other nations, yet we can't provide basic care for those who can't take care of themselves. We can do better.


it is not society that spends money bombing nations. our government picks our pockets, stealing from paychecks before they are cashed. this government is owned and run by the wealthy powerful families that own the factories that make lots of money building things to kill people.
last week there was a linked article on FARK about a fighter jet program that cost $400 billion dollars. no one okayed that with me. and i doubt they asked for your input either.
IMHO our biggest problem is we're a nation full of firearm owners who point them at all the wrong targets.
you're right. we can do better. and i'd bet if things were run by regular every day good hearted slobs with the help of others to make sure power didn't go to their heads, we could have a frickin' Nirvana.
sick twisted greedy wealthy power hungry people will fark things up as long as we continue to let them do so.
 
2013-03-04 11:59:11 AM

MrSteve007: There was a time when most of these people were institutionalized:
[www.richardavedon.com image 850x519]

While there certainly were many abuses and problems with the old system, it seems better than letting the disturbed, psychotic, or mentally inept wander the streets, begging for handouts, and dying in the cold. Instead of confronting the problem, we choose to look away and ignore it.

[static.igossip.com image 550x440]

[teamowens313.files.wordpress.com image 620x408]

As a society, we hardly blink an eye when we spend hundreds of billions to bomb other nations, yet we can't provide basic care for those who can't take care of themselves. We can do better.


Wow, that last picture is heartbreaking.
 
2013-03-04 12:03:00 PM

I'm an Egyptian!: megarian: I'm an Egyptian!: megarian: I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit

Welcome to hell. Fear not, you will not be alone. It's one of the most soul-crushing, but at the same time, most rewarding fields you could get into.

My internship has been pretty difficult, shocking, and sad...

...but also extremely awesome, humbling, and rewarding.

Thank you for kind words. Much appreciated :)

Glad to hear it. Just don't fall into the trap that you can save anyone. They're the only ones that can. All we do is create the circumstances to allow them to do that. It's like gardening. They give you the seed. You plant it, fertilize it, water, and do whatever you can to make it grow. In places like Detroit and other places, the soil sucks. It's all concrete, depleted soil, harsh climate, and easy to get trampled. But every so often, that seed you plant finds a way in the cracks, manages to scrape up the meager nutrients that are there, and starts to grow. If you're really lucky, you notice it isn't just growing, but it's flourishing. Every so often, you find a rose growing out of the concrete. If you can take a mental snapshot of that, and nuture it in your own mind, it helps to keep your head up amid the despair.

One of my old Zen teachers told me to be a Bodhisattva.Specifically, one of the ones that forsakes their own enlightenment to guide others along the way. In a way, that's what a social worker is. A Bodhisattva. We stand amid the muck so we can get others to climb out. Just be sure to take care of yourself along the way. Good luck to you. If you need anything, EIP.


Wow. And thank you. Insta-favorited.
 
2013-03-04 12:03:21 PM
So, Hunter's Point is no longer the best place in SF to get yourself killed?
 
2013-03-04 12:07:20 PM

jylcat: Generation_D: you've created whole entire areas that are open-air psych wards.

That's not the fault of the psych workers, it's the fault of Regan closing the inpatient psychiatric hospitals in the 60
s-70s and not funding community care models.


Ding. Involuntarily committing people is absolutely a violation of their right to liberty and freedom of movement. What we realized much too late is that this restriction is reasonable in the face of the alternative.
 
2013-03-04 12:09:35 PM

megarian: I'm an Egyptian!: megarian: I'm an Egyptian!: megarian: I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit

Welcome to hell. Fear not, you will not be alone. It's one of the most soul-crushing, but at the same time, most rewarding fields you could get into.

My internship has been pretty difficult, shocking, and sad...

...but also extremely awesome, humbling, and rewarding.

Thank you for kind words. Much appreciated :)

Glad to hear it. Just don't fall into the trap that you can save anyone. They're the only ones that can. All we do is create the circumstances to allow them to do that. It's like gardening. They give you the seed. You plant it, fertilize it, water, and do whatever you can to make it grow. In places like Detroit and other places, the soil sucks. It's all concrete, depleted soil, harsh climate, and easy to get trampled. But every so often, that seed you plant finds a way in the cracks, manages to scrape up the meager nutrients that are there, and starts to grow. If you're really lucky, you notice it isn't just growing, but it's flourishing. Every so often, you find a rose growing out of the concrete. If you can take a mental snapshot of that, and nuture it in your own mind, it helps to keep your head up amid the despair.

One of my old Zen teachers told me to be a Bodhisattva.Specifically, one of the ones that forsakes their own enlightenment to guide others along the way. In a way, that's what a social worker is. A Bodhisattva. We stand amid the muck so we can get others to climb out. Just be sure to take care of yourself along the way. Good luck to you. If you need anything, EIP.

Wow. And thank you. Insta-favorited.


No worries. We social workers have to stick together. Welcome to the club.
 
2013-03-04 12:19:39 PM

onyxruby: If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with.



That's one of the stupidest claims I've read in a long time.

Hopefully you'll be the one who makes the decisions because you sound tough enough to make the hard choices. Especially with respect to rehabilitation or permanent institutionalization versus euthanasia in order to minimizes costs.

Go to Hell.
 
2013-03-04 12:30:48 PM

Pangea: Hopefully you'll be the one who makes the decisions because you sound tough enough to make the hard choices.


Hard choices like working with doctors, psychologists and psychiatrists to have my ex-wife committed when she wasn't mentally stable (one that has a court record for threatening to kill her own child - something I learned after getting married)? Hard choices like going to hundreds of mental health meetings over the years to support a step-son that needed intensive mental health support instead of dumping him into a prison school where I wouldn't have to deal with him?

Hard choices like watching friends live on streets like that because they couldn't get the help they need, and helping a number homeless friends over the years when were willing to let someone help them out?

Hard choices, yeah, I think I know a thing or two about them. Now you can take judgmental self righteous ass and pack it right back into the ivory tower you came from.
 
2013-03-04 12:34:07 PM

Generation_D: I cannot understand why we open clinics to attract the addicted. It is only perpetuating their addiction. I would be fully in favor of hospital care, but nobody wants to pay for that, we're too busy paying for prison care instead.


Half our population can't find a dime to help someone but they can find a lot more than that to punish someone.  It's the save a baby, kill a doctor mentality.  If you give someone a couple bucks to try and find food or a roof then they are worthless welfare farks so you throw them in jail and pay the wealthy and well connected lots of taxpayer money so you don't have to deal with them - that's moral.

The truly naive and willfully ignorant mindset.  But then again I'm so tired of this argument I really don't care who kills who anymore.  Give everybody a gun and let them fend for themselves.  Just get it over with and STFU.
 
2013-03-04 12:39:30 PM
SHUT UP LITTLE MAN
 
2013-03-04 12:40:17 PM

The Irresponsible Captain: "For I was hungry, and you gave Me something to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave Me something to drink; I was a stranger, and you invited Me in; naked, and you clothed Me; I was sick, and you visited Me; I was in prison, and you came to Me."

It's truly disheartening that we can't find a little more for those who work so hard for those who do not, and may not ever be able to thank them. <b>That people lucky enough to have never worried about a roof over their heads or food on the table cannot muster any compassion and justify it in every way possible.</b> It's the little people like this, fighting every day to hold back the tide that give us hope. They save lives and families.


When Mitt made snide remarks about the 47% this is exactly what was going on. There's a lot of truth in the old adage (and hideous glam-rock song title) "you don't know what you've got `til it's gone". Do most folks ever sit and truly ponder the mechanics of having feet? Nope. The feet are there and Joe Schmoe's usin' `em to walk!

It's easy to hate ignorance or be upset by it. When it comes to folks unable to have compassion for these folks, well, I see it as an expected mammalian response. Think about it like little kids' fear of very old people. There's nothing "wrong" with the old person to an adult. They're a typical old person. To a kid, there's something very wrong with the old person and it's instinct for the kid to be repulsed. Prior to our wonderful, soft society, such an instinct could save the kid's life. You don't want to be poking around a fellow mammal that coughs a lot. You could get sick.

Most adults learn to accept old people. The elderly won't normally make us sick. Adults in or near their primes see most old people as just "run down" or "tired". That is no threat and we can thus accept the old. We add on a human perspective over time and can have compassion, even empathy, for old people. The compassionate or empathic "human" reaction to an old person is learned over time through repeated exposure to the elderly (as one hurdles towards old age oneself).

See a nude transgender rolling backwards in a wheelchair down a hill yelling at people while toking a crack pipe, and chances are the unholy roller will trigger a few of those mammalian aversion cues and we usually never get to the part about compassion. Such an event is also likely to have induced a strong enough aversion response, that the viewer learns to avoid such an individual quickly, and may even enact steps to ensure that he or she won't have a similar experience in the future. A lot of folks don't experience the Tenderloin conditions on a regular basis and will have zero common ground on which to build compassion or empathy. And they won't stick around for further "exposures"...

TL;DR - Mammals sniff mammals and keep moving if the scent is wrong. It's perfectly normal and was once upon a time vital to human survival.
 
2013-03-04 12:43:04 PM

onyxruby: Hard choices, yeah, I think I know a thing or two about them. Now you can take judgmental self righteous ass and pack it right back into the ivory tower you came from.


Nothing about your depressing back-story makes your original claim any less false.  Not everyone who is unfit to own a gun belongs locked away in an institution.

The fact that you've been around mental health programs for years should only serve to make you more cognisant of that reality, not less.
 
2013-03-04 12:54:11 PM
Lagaidh: See a nude transgender rolling backwards in a wheelchair down a hill yelling at people while toking a crack pipe...

That was simply fantastic.
 
2013-03-04 12:58:49 PM
Yes, that's the San Francisco I know and loathe.
 
2013-03-04 01:00:55 PM

megarian: Lagaidh: See a nude transgender rolling backwards in a wheelchair down a hill yelling at people while toking a crack pipe...

That was simply fantastic.


Indeed, an utterly awesome yet depressing mental picture all at once.
 
2013-03-04 01:01:03 PM
Either way, I'd murder for a fat, juicy steak right about now...
 
2013-03-04 01:01:29 PM

organizmx: enik: The awakening of a naive liberal. It will happen to the vast majority of Farkers eventually too.

Ah yes, let all the conservative Christians laugh at the naive liberal doing God's work.

/not like Jesus ever got criticized for spending all his time helping the bottom of society.


This girl is helping Teabaggers?
 
2013-03-04 01:02:23 PM

Pangea: onyxruby: Hard choices, yeah, I think I know a thing or two about them. Now you can take judgmental self righteous ass and pack it right back into the ivory tower you came from.

Nothing about your depressing back-story makes your original claim any less false.  Not everyone who is unfit to own a gun belongs locked away in an institution.

The fact that you've been around mental health programs for years should only serve to make you more cognisant of that reality, not less.


That or I gave a person with mental illness a chance and stood by her and my stepson when things took a turn for the worse.

Did you know there are people that actually take things like marriage vows seriously?
 
2013-03-04 01:02:57 PM
As a social worker by trade, I understand some of what this woman is going thru.  I cannot do that work.  Too soft.  It would destroy me.

2 new farky social workers favorited now though
 
2013-03-04 01:12:56 PM

Felix_T_Cat: We're aware that we're probably not going to be a church that most people will bring their families to.


Universalists!??

/i keed
 
2013-03-04 01:14:04 PM

onyxruby: Pangea: That or I gave a person with mental illness a chance and stood by her and my stepson when things took a turn for the worse.

Did you know there are people that actually take things like marriage vows seriously?



I take my marriage vows seriously too. You're intentionally avoiding the issue, which was me challenging your original statement: "If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with."

I believe that is patently incorrect, and imagine that you do as well in retrospect because you're trying to divert your argument into something entirely different.

It's entirely reasonable to assume that you misspoke because you're so emotionally involved in your own experience with the mental illnesses of two specific people. Your situation sucks and good on you trying to make it work; it's not your fault. I think we're done here though.
 
2013-03-04 01:14:08 PM

madgonad: onyxruby: Lee Jackson Beauregard: FTFA: Why are my clients so farked up? Traumatic backgrounds, PTSD, and severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia are the most frequent cases we see). And whenever you combine a drug habit with compromised mental health, you usually get a mess of a brain.

Is the NRA still in favor of proper psychiatric care?

Not a member of the NRA, but someone who has known people with severe mental health issues.

If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with. We closed down the institutions in the name of humanity and this was the real world result.

People like these described once received medical and psychiatric care as well as having a roof over their head and meals to eat. Their quality of life was far higher than today.

We need to open the institutions, run them humanely, get people like these off the street and make psychiatric care readily available. We can do all of this to take care of our own without trampling on second amendment rights.

No, to be specific, Reagan closed down the institutions because he was cheap, thoughtless, and wanted his rich donors that ran private facilities to get even richer.

It didn't take long for those people to max-out their potential benefit and then they would spend the rest of their lives bouncing from the streets to jail/prison.


Reagan could only have done that for California - not all of the US.  I think the whole initiative was kicked off by the 'Patient's Rights' movement that the ACLU spearheaded.  State governments (of both parties) siezed on this as a chance to trim budgets.

Something does need to be done about how to take care of the truly mentally ill and disabled.  In my state (Kansas) funding was cut a few years ago for group homes.  Now, between the hours of 9AM and 3PM, everyone living in a KS sponsored group home has to leave since there will be no nurse on site to help watch everyone.  Regardless of weather.  Or level of care needed. Period.

The governor that approved that cut - Kathleen Sebielius.  Even if Sam Brownback (R) had done it, I'd still consider it wrong.
 
2013-03-04 01:32:26 PM
I'll see that and raise you a half sister who works in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, doing interventions on people too crazy for the police to handle. Picture it: you've got some guy with every mental malady made known to man AND a skull full of every drug known to man who has been taking hefty gulps from the can of paint thinner he found and is now highly convinced that the Decepticons are trying to steal one of his penises. The cops have tried to reason with him and gotten nothing but torrents of obscenity alternating with screaming gibberish and he is now running around shrieking nonsense and knocking things over and such. So they send for my half sister. Working there has given her a disposition comparable to Judge Dredd. She's got the frown down pat, anyway. I always thought the best thing for areas like this would be to take all the shattered hulks of people who live there and put them in some facility deep in the countryside where they can be looked after properly. Like one of those institution things that one used to see. That would never fly, of course. Not in the Yew Ess Of Ay, where survival of the fittest is the order of the day. Can't have no retards getting mollycoddled, no sir. Make them get out there and fight for their daily bread like everyone else, that's the 'Murikan way. If they can't do that because the world is just a mad blur to them, why, it's their fault for not being loved enough by Gawd.
 
2013-03-04 01:35:31 PM

IlGreven: onyxruby:

We need to open the institutions, run them humanely, get people like these off the street and make psychiatric care readily available. We can do all of this to take care of our own without trampling on second amendment rights.

The lack of humaneness of these institutions is what got them shut down in the first place.  Which means that's the trick to the thing, because otherwise most people are going to think the kind of people that would need these places are better off on the street.


Exactly. What society is basically trying to cure is humanity's inhumanity towards its own. Everyone seems to believe that they know the "trick" to making that happen. However, those who bother to read history know that every trick in the book has already been tried and none of them work perfectly. No matter what solution one tries there will be people who abuse the situation. That seems to be, sadly, a part of human nature or at least the core nature of some humans.
 
2013-03-04 01:39:18 PM
And this... this is why I can't stand the city of San Fransisco.

Are there other cities that are as bad or worse? Of course. None are as pretentious as San Fransisco.
 
2013-03-04 01:44:00 PM

504_King_streetcar: Not in the Yew Ess Of Ay, where survival of the fittest is the order of the day. Can't have no retards getting mollycoddled, no sir. Make them get out there and fight for their daily bread like everyone else, that's the 'Murikan way. If they can't do that because the world is just a mad blur to them, why, it's their fault for not being loved enough by Gawd.


The liberal side of this is that we can't detain these misunderstood individuals just because they're a little different. The humane thing to do is let them go on and walk the streets freely, even if it means that half of them will eventually abandon treatment and freeze to death in a ditch full of used needles or end up shot by the cops after they try to shove somebody in front of a subway train. A life of confusion and terror is a civil right guaranteed by the Constitution. Verily, it is a bipartisan shiatpie.
 
2013-03-04 01:44:25 PM

MrSteve007: ]

As a society, we hardly blink an eye when we spend hundreds of billions to bomb other nations, yet we can't provide basic care for those who can't take care of themselves. We can do better.


We can do better but we don't want to do better. There are two ways to feel superior to others: a) build yourself up or b) tear others down. As a nation we stopped doing a) a long time ago and have stuck exclusively with b) because it is both easier and cheaper.

You see, in order to do "better" American society has to posses a unified vision of what is "better". We don't. We hate each other. So the only way to hold society together is find a common enemy to tear down. We can't agree to love our neighbor so we keep together by agreeing to hate that fellow over there. Works like a charm.
 
2013-03-04 01:45:38 PM

Marine1: And this... this is why I can't stand the city of San Fransisco.

Are there other cities that are as bad or worse? Of course. None are as pretentious as San Fransisco.


...and the city doesn't need you either ..bu by.  Cya hate to be ya.
 
2013-03-04 01:45:44 PM
Dirt pipe milshakes
 
2013-03-04 01:48:45 PM

JerkyMeat: Marine1: And this... this is why I can't stand the city of San Fransisco.

Are there other cities that are as bad or worse? Of course. None are as pretentious as San Fransisco.

...and the city doesn't need you either ..bu by.  Cya hate to be ya.


If you go through life or existence refusing to accept the criticism of others as constructive, you'll meet ruin.
 
2013-03-04 01:52:08 PM

Marine1: And this... this is why I can't stand the city of San Fransisco.

Are there other cities that are as bad or worse? Of course. None are as pretentious as San Fransisco.


Well you sound like a peach.

Guess what: it works both ways. Stay the fark out of our city. We're not missing you.
 
2013-03-04 01:55:49 PM

Marine1: And this... this is why I can't stand the city of San Fransisco.

Are there other cities that are as bad or worse? Of course. None are as pretentious as San Fransisco.


Every city is like this. Few are as pretentious however. Still, love the bay area.
 
2013-03-04 01:56:02 PM

freewill: 504_King_streetcar: Not in the Yew Ess Of Ay, where survival of the fittest is the order of the day. Can't have no retards getting mollycoddled, no sir. Make them get out there and fight for their daily bread like everyone else, that's the 'Murikan way. If they can't do that because the world is just a mad blur to them, why, it's their fault for not being loved enough by Gawd.

The liberal side of this is that we can't detain these misunderstood individuals just because they're a little different. The humane thing to do is let them go on and walk the streets freely, even if it means that half of them will eventually abandon treatment and freeze to death in a ditch full of used needles or end up shot by the cops after they try to shove somebody in front of a subway train. A life of confusion and terror is a civil right guaranteed by the Constitution. Verily, it is a bipartisan shiatpie.


I live in Parkdale, and area of Toronto that is known for its mental diversity. In other words, it's an open air laughing academy. So I know of what you speak. It's a problem with an obvious solution - lock the poor bastiches up, not to keep them away from us but to keep us away from them. Put them in a safe environment and let them have a little peace and quiet. But NOOOOOO can't have that, they've either got to go out and compete in a race they can't comprehend let alone win OR have their right to live in the community guaranteed even if they haven't got anything like the resources to live there. And both sides will stick to their guns until beyond the end of time, fighting tooth and nail for what they think is right and never giving a second's thought to whether or not what they want is actually right. Details like that don't matter, what matters is that the right team wins. I feel like I'm losing a few sanity points just thinking about it.
 
2013-03-04 01:56:11 PM

Marine1: If you go through life or existence refusing to accept the criticism of others as constructive, you'll meet ruin.


Yet you knock SF as "pretentious." You're pretending to be literate with that Midwestern-shopping-mall-Auntie-Anne's-pretzel of a sentence, your profile indicates you're not actually a Marine, and the "criticism" you so helpfully offered was a mis-applied insult.

Also, all human existence is life. Not "or."

It's not that SF is full of "pretentious" farkers that do something wrong. It's that you're a farking goof, and the kind of people that live in SF are the kind of people that realize it.
 
2013-03-04 02:04:18 PM
Back on topic: I live on that "rich person hill" they talk about, above the TL. The hill isn't nearly as rich, and the TL isn't nearly as bad, as this article -- and these commenters -- would have you believe.

Sure it's easy to buy crack and heroin once you get below O'Farrell past, say, Leavenworth...and the biggest benefit to living on Nob Hill is you're close to everything but high enough up the hill that the junkies are tired of climbing before the get to your door...but one of the reasons SF is a great place is that, if the people had their way, far fewer of our dollars would be spent on cops, lawyers, and prisons for people like this, and far more would be spent on hospitals and care.

It's easy to get jaded, as so many "fark 'em all" Farkers above me are. Hell, I'm no great friend to the 14 guys that ask me for money every day (but I'm happy my taxes are providing shelters and programs for those that would use them). Because for every career a55hole wandering the Loin, busting car windows to have a sidewalk sale, you have a guy like this:

http://www.examiner.com/article/shoeshine-man-s-plight-shows-the-gov er nment-sees-no-right-to-make-a-living

And that's why you can't write them all off. You're not required to help these people yourself. That's your choice. But don't go out of your way to stand in theirs.

Final point: you are not allowed to rip on the mentally ill unless you've had a family member/loved one with mental issues. You don't know what the fark you're talking about.

/SF: we'd rather help the wrong guy, so long as it meant maybe reaching the right one. It's better than the alternative.
 
2013-03-04 02:14:49 PM
Did anyone read the comment about how they fired this poor woman?
I wonder if it is true...
 
2013-03-04 02:38:39 PM

Scrotastic Method: Marine1: If you go through life or existence refusing to accept the criticism of others as constructive, you'll meet ruin.

Yet you knock SF as "pretentious." You're pretending to be literate with that Midwestern-shopping-mall-Auntie-Anne's-pretzel of a sentence, your profile indicates you're not actually a Marine, and the "criticism" you so helpfully offered was a mis-applied insult.

Also, all human existence is life. Not "or."

It's not that SF is full of "pretentious" farkers that do something wrong. It's that you're a farking goof, and the kind of people that live in SF are the kind of people that realize it.


Wonderful.

While you insult me based on the fact that I don't like your city, there are still a bunch of guys roaming around shiatting up the escalators in BART stations.

I've been to Frisco. It's a nice town. Lots of culture. Lots of intellectual capital. On the other hand, for all of the advantages those things can (and do) bring SF, remarkably little has been used to solve the problems of the city. I've never seen such a disparity in quality of life anywhere else. You can go through Union Square and see shops selling wares that would cost a whole year's salary, then go out to the plaza and see three or four aromatic homeless guys lounging around. The solution?

Give them dogs.


Charitable giving in San Fransisco is nothing to crow about, either. Heck, people in Kansas City and Tulsa give more, and those are areas with far less economic activity.

How America Gives

For all the talk of progressive values and cooperation in that city, it doesn't seem to mean much for the folks that need it the most.
 
2013-03-04 02:53:32 PM
Good lord. You want to compare people donating to their church in Tulsa to people in SF time and again voting to divert substantial tax money to social programs? What's the homelessness rate in middle-of-nowhere Missouri? Oklahoma?

You really think Union Square is the only tourist destination that attracts beggars?

SF attracts more homeless than any other city in the US -- possibly the world. We spend more money on it than any other city in the US -- possibly the world. People like the author of this article are the boots on the ground. But she's a band-aid on a bullet wound.

I'm sorry you had a bad time because some smelly guy got in your way when you came out of Cheescake Factory. But you're probably the type that should have stayed in Missouri, playing your video game, pretending that makes you a soldier.
 
2013-03-04 03:08:08 PM

Happy Hours: xanadian: Pork or beef tenderloin?

I prefer a good chuck roast myself, though...

Yeah, what the fark is Tenderloin in the context of the headline?

I think it's a part of San Francisco, but I'm not sure. I just happen to know that - or think I know that, but I'm not sure. I'm guessing from the headline it's not a very good part of SF. Come to think of it, I'm not sure there are any good parts of SF. I've heard of Tenderloin (where people show up dead or murdered), Castro (where the gay people live NTTAWWT) and the Mission district ("walkin' along in the Mission, in the rain) where some guy missing part of his finger grew up, but I hear that's not a great place either.

/never been to Frisco, obviously - and I call it Frisco because I gather it pisses off the people who actually live in SF. (and it's shorter)


As you managed to surmise, the Tenderloin is part of San Fran.  Frisco is the nick name for the north side of the bay, not San Fransisco, so it doesn't so much piss people off, they just think you are retarded.

Ever heard of Pike place? Times Square?  Etc etc etc.

Also, people from there say "hella" which I think is funny.
 
2013-03-04 03:13:05 PM
Looking forward to the "social worker fired for giving interview about her work" story a couple days from now.
 
2013-03-04 03:18:27 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Looking forward to the "social worker fired for giving interview about her work" story a couple days from now.


Apparently, she has already been fired.
 
2013-03-04 03:19:06 PM
Moral:  never stick your dick in social worker.
 
2013-03-04 03:22:10 PM
For what it's worth, I think this person they interviewed has a reasonable attitude towards it. She acknowledges that it's farked up (because it is, for fark's sake) and is realistic (though I feel certain she's probably held back on some of the worst shiat) about what it entails. As long as she's not abusive towards them, I don't see what the problem is with realistically describing work that most of us would not be able to do for even one full day.

I doubt the crackheads and loonies she's describing would be offended by her descriptions of them, even if they were aware of them.

And I agree with her that most of these people don't want help. Some of them are just farking crazy and don't think they need help. And the junkies and drunks just plain don't want it. They just want to get high or drunk.
 
2013-03-04 03:25:39 PM
I had a coworker who used to be one of the CPS guys in Detroit that removed kids from hellish homes.

Amazing effing guy who never talked about specifics - only that it was a job that had to be done, and only he and one other guy could really handle the combination of seeing the daily living hell those kids were in and the possible violence awaiting them when they arrived with the court order.

But he did wonder how many Young, Ambitious, and ultimately naive kids fresh with their Social Work MS degrees in hand he saw get completely burned out on social work (and kind of life / goodness of humanity in general) after working there with him.  He couldn't count how many didn't make it a year or even a month.

I think he saw that burnout happening in me, different situation but similar "what the hell things just keep getting worse while I'm working myself to my physical limit" situation.  He was right.  One of the most perceptive and honestly compassionate people I've ever met.
 
2013-03-04 03:27:32 PM

onyxruby: If your not mentally stable enough to own a gun, you shouldn't be on the street to begin with.


I'd argue that I'm not mentally stable enough to own a gun (couldn't anyway; I've been involuntarily institutionalized), but no one has ever told me that I should be permanently institutionalized.
 
2013-03-04 03:34:21 PM

jpk_ks: Something does need to be done about how to take care of the truly mentally ill and disabled. In my state (Kansas) funding was cut a few years ago for group homes. Now, between the hours of 9AM and 3PM, everyone living in a KS sponsored group home has to leave since there will be no nurse on site to help watch everyone. Regardless of weather. Or level of care needed. Period.

The governor that approved that cut - Kathleen Sebielius. Even if Sam Brownback (R) had done it, I'd still consider it wrong.


You hit on my point, community based mental health care is a complete and epic failure. We need to go back to the institutions where we can utilize economies of scale that are presently not possible and allow people to slip between the cracks. In many communities homeless dogs are treated better than the homeless mentally ill and it's not the least bit humane.

Local communities are either unwilling or unable to take responsibility for the severely mentally ill, and they can't take responsibility for themselves. Society needs to step up and do the right thing.
 
2013-03-04 03:40:08 PM

GranoblasticMan: I'd argue that I'm not mentally stable enough to own a gun (couldn't anyway; I've been involuntarily institutionalized)


If your stable enough to function in society without being a danger to yourself or others you should be able to own a gun. Think of the crazy lady with the 9 year old from yesterday that she thought was ill-equipped for manhood someday - she drowned him.

If you are a danger to yourself or others you shouldn't be in society (and therefore capable of buying a gun to begin with). Millions of people have been through treatment for drugs or alcohol and rejoined society with success for example.
 
2013-03-04 04:00:12 PM

Kahabut: Also, people from there say "hella" which I think is funny.


Before I moved out here I knew musicians from the Bay Area, they'd come to where I grew up, we'd hang, they'd say hella, and I'd laugh in their face. After 8-ish years of living here...I can't stop saying it myself. It's a perfectly cromulent word.
 
2013-03-04 04:03:29 PM

Scrotastic Method: Kahabut: Also, people from there say "hella" which I think is funny.

Before I moved out here I knew musicians from the Bay Area, they'd come to where I grew up, we'd hang, they'd say hella, and I'd laugh in their face. After 8-ish years of living here...I can't stop saying it myself. It's a perfectly cromulent word.


I only lived in SF for about 3 years, I managed to get away without having picked up that word.

I do however say "a minute" when I mean more like 2 days.  Gah!!!!!!
 
2013-03-04 04:23:08 PM
used to live there, i miss the cockroaches crawling over me at night and the smell of puke and urine in the streets.
 
Ehh
2013-03-04 04:26:07 PM
I know someone who works in a similar job here in Los Angeles. Her latest joke: She works in the only growth industry that the United States has right now.

/bankrupt, paranoid, and murderous is no way to go through life, you bum
/unless you're the U.S. government
 
2013-03-04 04:40:53 PM

Cold_Sassy: MrSteve007: There was a time when most of these people were institutionalized:
[www.richardavedon.com image 850x519]

While there certainly were many abuses and problems with the old system, it seems better than letting the disturbed, psychotic, or mentally inept wander the streets, begging for handouts, and dying in the cold. Instead of confronting the problem, we choose to look away and ignore it.

[static.igossip.com image 550x440]

[teamowens313.files.wordpress.com image 620x408]

As a society, we hardly blink an eye when we spend hundreds of billions to bomb other nations, yet we can't provide basic care for those who can't take care of themselves. We can do better.

Wow, that last picture is heartbreaking.


I know! Did he get...paved over??? I'm not sure what I'm seeing...
 
2013-03-04 04:54:57 PM

stonent: Yeah, so where are all the "legalize drugs" cheerleaders now?


Right here. Legalize them all.
 
2013-03-04 04:58:52 PM
She's a social worker?!  Pffft, what a loser.

Couldn't she have gotten a job as an i-banker or something to do with venture capital or tech?
 
2013-03-04 05:15:48 PM

Generation_D: And this is exhibit A of "Why do we keep trying to help them?"

We shouldn't.


Maybe if you had decent universal mental health care, free at point of use, you wouldn't have quite so many people needing this sort of help.
 
2013-03-04 05:29:06 PM

Generation_D: Why are people who won't save themselves worth saving?


Because they are human beings. That is why we should feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, welcome the stranger, clothe the naked, comfort the sick, visit the prisoner and bury the dead.
 
2013-03-04 05:37:35 PM

onyxruby: You hit on my point, community based mental health care is a complete and epic failure.


Community based mental health care can work - if it's properly resourced, and that's expensive. Unfortunately the move away from institutional care is almost always driven by a desire to save money, not by a desire to provide better care.
 
2013-03-04 05:54:05 PM

orbister: Community based mental health care can work - if it's properly resourced, and that's expensive. Unfortunately the move away from institutional care is almost always driven by a desire to save money, not by a desire to provide better care.


The problem is socioeconomic, it is simply far too expensive to make it work in the community. We have decades of this failed experience built upon the concept of 'it takes a village'. Understand I am a very ardent supporter of making sure people get mental health care.

I just recognize that our current system is a failure and the only way to make it work is to go back to the model where we can benefit from economies of scale, effectively monitor people (patients and staff) and ensure programs and resources are available that could never otherwise be justified. It's a lot easier to monitor a few big centers than a bunch of small ones.
 
2013-03-04 06:34:34 PM

GranoblasticMan: What a social worker might look like:

[i.imgur.com image 598x429]


Yeah, but she's free-lance.
 
2013-03-04 08:00:27 PM
My Tenderloin CSB story.

Visited San Francisco with a buddy of mine a few years ago.  At one of the bars I was chatting up a really attractive guy who was seemingly very interested in me as well.  I had had a bit too much to drink, so when he mentioned that he lived in the Tenderloin, I commented on the fact that I'd heard it's a rough part of town to live him.  He took that personally and immediately became distant and stand-offish.

Later that night, the guy honed in on my buddy and started hitting on him and making out with him -- I presume to make me jealous or to get back at me.  Not that it worked, it was San Francisco, the bar was filled with attractive, friendly guys.

Anyway, Tenderloin dude -- yeah, he gave my buddy crabs.

I dodged a bullet.
 
2013-03-04 08:12:38 PM

lack of warmth: SubBass49: If you think this was depressing, try being a public school teacher that serves a neighborhood like that.  Then imagine that these same people are the "parents" of the children you teach, and that sometimes the kids fall down that mineshaft of human existence right alongside them.

(have already caught 3 kids dealing drugs this school year in my classroom)

And with that I'm off to work!

Oh woe is you, since you are the one who follows up with home visits and the like.  No, oh that is right teachers call social workers and the police to take over.  Chances are, you're only guessing about their home life since you haven't actually seen it.  I had a teacher make a false call on me once, the CPS worker was surprised to see our house was clean and nice.  It's nice not having my kids around judgmental  educators anymore.

(even upscale areas having drug dealing in schools)


I have actually done home visits, so kindly fark yourself with a rusty fork.  Therefore, I HAVE seen the home life of the students I serve.  I also meet the dozen or so parents that show up (out of 170+ students that I teach every year).  Give you any idea of the class of parenting going on where I teach?

Now, as for your bad experience over a "false call," there had to have been enough reasonable suspicion of neglectful or abusive behavior to get you the visit from CPS.  Just because you managed to hide it when they showed up doesn't mean the teacher was wrong to report it.  You do realize that all teachers are "mandated reporters," don't you?  Meaning, if we suspect something is going on, we HAVE to report it or face potentially being jailed and losing our careers.  I'm sorry someone didn't want to risk their career under the assumption that everything was rosy in your household.
 
2013-03-04 10:39:09 PM
AverageAmericanGuy:

I call it hipsternomics. As the number of hipsters grows, the demand for shops and restaurants follows. And since hipsters draw the line at marijuana, the percentage of the population that is drug addicted drops.

Hispters do more drugs than you could possibly imagine.
 
2013-03-04 11:48:51 PM
I'm an LMSW. I currently work with developmentally disabled adults who are the sweetest people I have ever met. However, the employees are a bunch of assholes and being a supervisor at the organization is stressing the hell out of me because I have to deal with their crap even on my days off (on-call responsibilities). I have more trouble getting the employees to show up for their shifts then I have with the residents themselves. I'm hoping to get into a clinic job where my days off are actually days off.
 
2013-03-05 12:32:51 AM
Sounds like a night around King Eddies. Worked in the Tenderloin as well a on a construction project. LA bums are more respectful the SF bums. SoCal bums are better then NorCal bums...

blogdowntown.com
 
2013-03-05 02:07:26 AM
It's a shame Hitler ruined the idea of a final solution to the schizo/crackhead/vagrant problem.
 
2013-03-05 02:46:11 AM

Bomb Mecca: It's a shame Hitler ruined the idea of a final solution to the schizo/crackhead/vagrant problem.


I'd gladly deal with the occasional crack head breaking into my car, than having B17 dropping a 500lb bomb on it.
 
2013-03-05 02:57:18 AM
megarian:
"I'm in my last semester for my Masters in Social Work... so I'm getting a kick...

Oh wait, no. No I'm not. Difficulty level: Detroit"

You were already awesome, but this ups your awesomeness.

What field are you planning on going into?
 
2013-03-05 03:05:58 AM
Generation_D:
"To the social workers out there:

Why are people who won't save themselves worth saving?

Don't quote crap like I'm paying you to prevent them from mugging me, that is ridiculous. Most of these farkwits you see being homeless can barely function. If anything it seems like maintaining their habits is just helping them on a slow road to where they're going to go eventually."

Just because someone is broken doesn't mean they don't deserve basic respect and compassion.

I don't believe in handouts but the fact remains that homeless people are seen as a blight, so that's one major reason they put those people up in the residential hotels. If they were all on the street, sf would probably suffer even more in terms of being able to draw business and tourists.

I'm a social worker partially because I'm an optimist and a nurturer by nature. And as cheesy as it sounds, there's a certain spiritual satisfaction I get out of being around people who are at their most vulnerable. It gives me perspective and makes me thankful for all that I have.

But even I couldn't work in the tenderloin or oakland. Everyone has their limits.

But then again, I loved working at a tech start-up too. *shrug*
 
2013-03-05 04:08:29 AM
Kahabut:
 "Frisco is the nick name for the north side of the bay, not San Fransisco,"

Wait, what? I'm from the bay and I've never heard that description of the word.
 
2013-03-05 04:26:31 AM
onyxruby:

orbister: Community based mental health care can work - if it's properly resourced, and that's expensive. Unfortunately the move away from institutional care is almost always driven by a desire to save money, not by a desire to provide better care.

"The problem is socioeconomic, it is simply far too expensive to make it work in the community. We have decades of this failed experience built upon the concept of 'it takes a village'. Understand I am a very ardent supporter of making sure people get mental health care.

I just recognize that our current system is a failure and the only way to make it work is to go back to the model where we can benefit from economies of scale, effectively monitor people (patients and staff) and ensure programs and resources are available that could never otherwise be justified. It's a lot easier to monitor a few big centers than a bunch of small ones."

Not sure why you keep mentioning "economies of scale". Institutions are far from economical to run.

Community health monitoring where people live in their homes is VASTLY cheaper than institutions, has much less rampant abuse (physically, mentally, etc).

There are a few institutions left in the US and they are generally a financial pit that creates horrible situations for abuse. The ny times did a heartbreaking story a few months ago about a physically and mentally disabled teen who was murdered by staff in one in ny.

I agree with orbister. It takes money, and it takes an accessible health care system. Right now there is so much bureaucracy, it's nearly impossible to navigate it on your own if you are dealing with delusions, ptsd, etc
 
2013-03-05 10:03:10 AM

silvervial: Cold_Sassy: MrSteve007: There was a time when most of these people were institutionalized:
[www.richardavedon.com image 850x519]

While there certainly were many abuses and problems with the old system, it seems better than letting the disturbed, psychotic, or mentally inept wander the streets, begging for handouts, and dying in the cold. Instead of confronting the problem, we choose to look away and ignore it.

[static.igossip.com image 550x440]

[teamowens313.files.wordpress.com image 620x408]

As a society, we hardly blink an eye when we spend hundreds of billions to bomb other nations, yet we can't provide basic care for those who can't take care of themselves. We can do better.

Wow, that last picture is heartbreaking.

I know! Did he get...paved over??? I'm not sure what I'm seeing...


You've probably deciphered it by now, but he is dead and frozen underwater.
 
2013-03-05 12:45:23 PM

Scrotastic Method: Good lord. You want to compare people donating to their church in Tulsa to people in SF time and again voting to divert substantial tax money to social programs? What's the homelessness rate in middle-of-nowhere Missouri? Oklahoma?

You really think Union Square is the only tourist destination that attracts beggars?

SF attracts more homeless than any other city in the US -- possibly the world. We spend more money on it than any other city in the US -- possibly the world. People like the author of this article are the boots on the ground. But she's a band-aid on a bullet wound.

I'm sorry you had a bad time because some smelly guy got in your way when you came out of Cheescake Factory. But you're probably the type that should have stayed in Missouri, playing your video game, pretending that makes you a soldier.


Well, whatever you're doing, it's not working, and the stupid ideas that get floated in that city on how to fix it indicate that the town has become a parody of itself.

/and I hardly think that makes me a soldier
//need to figure out how to change that SN
 
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