If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Vice)   This guy's place has a laptop, internet, satellite TV, transportation and electricity all for only $250 a month (w/ pics)   (motherboard.vice.com) divider line 87
    More: Spiffy, Electricity, satellite TV, laptops, transportation  
•       •       •

10334 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Mar 2013 at 6:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



87 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-04 06:12:07 AM
You know what's missing?

farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2013-03-04 07:04:02 AM
What are his sources of income? Even with that miserly lifestyle, the costs still exist.
 
2013-03-04 07:07:29 AM

wildcardjack: You know what's missing?


Lack of running water partly explains it
 
2013-03-04 07:07:40 AM
That lifestyle is a chick magnet.
 
2013-03-04 07:09:16 AM
FTFA

"a Japanese philosophy student "

Stopped reading right there.
 
2013-03-04 07:17:53 AM
The Tiny Life...is that what being homeless is now called?
 
2013-03-04 07:27:26 AM
The distict lack of public bathhouses in the US would make the no-running-water issue rather more difficult for people who remain employed.  Also, the domocil cost $1000 in building supplies, and he built it himself, so no labor costs, but what about the land itself?  How much was that, or is he squatting on public land?  Living on his parents estate? What?
 
2013-03-04 07:30:49 AM
I don't think that house is up to the building any code, especially in Japan. And it's not really minimalist if you have a laptop, internet and satellite TV, is it ?
 
2013-03-04 07:31:46 AM
Hmm, this makes me curious of how little one could live on comfortably in the USA. Cost of living is rather high for the most part I think.
 
2013-03-04 07:39:47 AM
Might be easier to just stay in your parent's basement.
 
2013-03-04 07:52:52 AM

Jorn the Younger: The distict lack of public bathhouses in the US would make the no-running-water issue rather more difficult for people who remain employed.


Not to mention you'd be shot for driving 15 mph anywhere.
 
2013-03-04 08:00:01 AM
I do not know about Japan, but the issue with this type of ideal lifestyle is land usage. Parking that thing anywhere, for any amount of time would be a crime.

Maybe the Japanese are less "get off my property", but I doubt it. They live on an island.

//I would love to see public bath houses in North America, though.
///North Americans need to learn to God damned shower more, and allow the homeless/poor to shower, too.
 
2013-03-04 08:00:55 AM
Didn't we have these sort of thinking in the 60's?
 
2013-03-04 08:02:48 AM
i wouldn't call him "anti-materialist" as in TFA, i'd call him portable. he should meet my sister to learn about anti-materialist. she's practically frickin' Amish.
 
2013-03-04 08:22:16 AM

ModernLuddite: I do not know about Japan, but the issue with this type of ideal lifestyle is land usage. Parking that thing anywhere, for any amount of time would be a crime.

Maybe the Japanese are less "get off my property", but I doubt it. They live on an island.

//I would love to see public bath houses in North America, though.
///North Americans need to learn to God damned shower more, and allow the homeless/poor to shower, too.


There just aren't enough natural hot springs here in the U.S.
 
2013-03-04 08:23:14 AM

Jorn the Younger: The distict lack of public bathhouses in the US would make the no-running-water issue rather more difficult for people who remain employed.  Also, the domocil cost $1000 in building supplies, and he built it himself, so no labor costs, but what about the land itself?  How much was that, or is he squatting on public land?  Living on his parents estate? What?


I think the tiny house movement is pretty cool, and find the design of small livable spaces to be interesting, but basically for a majority of them it is only viable if you have larger infrastructure in place to mooch off of,  like a friend that will let you park your house in their back or side yard.

And then when you see that a place like this looks like it was transported from a shanty town slum and will end up in your yard in anything greater than a light rain shower, you see why the DIY tiny house concept is legislated out of possibility in 99% of the USA.
 
2013-03-04 08:28:40 AM

wildcardjack: You know what's missing?


Ginger was the hottie.
 
2013-03-04 08:29:07 AM
Prerequisite: Desire to live like a hobo.
 
2013-03-04 08:31:28 AM

manimal2878: And then when you see that a place like this looks like it was transported from a shanty town slum and will end up in your yard in anything greater than a light rain shower, you see why the DIY tiny house concept is legislated out of possibility in 99% of the USA.


While it is true you can not live in a shack and be with in 200 miles of a reasonably sized town, in most of the country, you can indeed build a small square footage house almost anywhere.  You will have to have a bathroom though.
 
2013-03-04 08:31:45 AM

bbfreak: Hmm, this makes me curious of how little one could live on comfortably in the USA. Cost of living is rather high for the most part I think.


I pay $15 for electricity each month (budgeted on an annual plan), and $30 for high speed Internet (30-50 mpbs). I'm billed under $4 each month for my phone (VOIP service. All I pay is state & local taxes) and $8 for Netflix (all my TV, movies, etc.) but on my Roku I get lots of other free entertainment as well (Crackle, several other less-known channels, Plex Media Server for Internet-fed stuff).

I do not pay for cable TV-- The biggest single "utility" bill I had when I was with my first wife was cable. It's ridiculous to pay $100 for what amounts to a bunch of reality show garbage that I never watch. Over-the-air is free. Internet is versatile.

Most people have a high monthly cost of living because they don't know how to trim the extra junk from their budget. For example: I don't eat out often: I cook. Food costs less when you're not paying someone to cook it, serve it and clean up after you. I go to the movies rarely. Why bother when it will be on Netflix, Vudu, or Redbox for a lot less in a few months? Why pay $10 for popcorn when I can pop it for under a buck at home?

I don't suffer. I still have lots of nice toys and gadgets. I still live in a nice neighborhood. I eat well.

I'm just saying most of the higher costs of living are purely optional, and if you put your mind to it you can easily slash the budget without much compromise. People in America pay a lot of money so they can be lazy: They don't want to cook, they don't want to search for entertainment, they don't want to put effort toward making anything when they can pay someone else to make it for them.
 
2013-03-04 08:33:29 AM
Oh, and unlike our Japanese friend here, I have plenty of room in my place for wild sex with my girl. That's the deal-breaker for these little box-houses as far as I'm concerned: No room to privately entertain guests.
 
2013-03-04 08:43:58 AM

ZeroCorpse: bbfreak: Hmm, this makes me curious of how little one could live on comfortably in the USA. Cost of living is rather high for the most part I think.

I pay $15 for electricity each month...


How the hell can you only spend $15 a month?  My bill is $100 a month atleast and I don't think I use that much power.  What kind of house can you power with that little or did you dump a ton of money into Solar Tiles?  If you did you need to factor the cost of that Solar setup.
 
2013-03-04 08:53:38 AM

sethen320: wildcardjack: You know what's missing?

Ginger  Mrs. Howell was the hottie.


FTFY.
 
2013-03-04 08:59:04 AM
OK, so he spends $100 on food a month.

That's about $23.52 a week, $3.36 a day, and if he's eating 3 meals a day, about $1.12 per meal.  That's "Ramen noodles, with some purchased veggies and occasionally some canned fish" level of eating.  Don't forget he doesn't really have any way to prepare an elaborate meal, so while you may be able to cook something that cheap but more healthy at home, he doesn't have the ability to do that.

Also, I wonder like AverageAmericanGuy:  If he's spending $250 a month, where is that coming from?
 
2013-03-04 09:04:22 AM

Tom_Slick: manimal2878: And then when you see that a place like this looks like it was transported from a shanty town slum and will end up in your yard in anything greater than a light rain shower, you see why the DIY tiny house concept is legislated out of possibility in 99% of the USA.

While it is true you can not live in a shack and be with in 200 miles of a reasonably sized town, in most of the country, you can indeed build a small square footage house almost anywhere.  You will have to have a bathroom though.


Not legally.  For unpermitted structures you are usually limited to about 120 sq feet, and must call it a shed, and cannot hook up water or electricity to it.

For a permitted structure the smallest size I have seen allowed by law is about 440 sq ft and would require actual blue prints before being built and permit approved water, sewage and power to be provided in some manner.   The tiny house movement is usually based on what can fit on a  trailer (to avoid having to get building permits, as the structure is a trailer and not a house) and is usually no more than 8 ft wide, these are somewhere between 80 and 200 sq ft I would guess based on trailer length.

This guy provides a few good examples of why this DIY concept is not looked at favorably:

-This guy framed his shack on what looks like 48" centers with 2x4s.  In the USA, for structural reasons, the standard is 16 inch centers with 2x4 so the thing doesn't fall over on you.

- He had no headers over doorways or windows.  In fact it appeared the windows were attached only to the outer sheathing and not the frame of the structure at all.

-He had no siding.  The outer sheathing, OSB board, was only lightly painted over thus not really providing a weather barrier on the structure.
  This thing is guaranteed to collapse, the only question is what will cause it first, rot or a good storm.
 
2013-03-04 09:07:54 AM

manimal2878: This thing is guaranteed to collapse, the only question is what will cause it first, rot or a good storm.


Or, you know...

i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-04 09:16:43 AM

manimal2878: This thing is guaranteed to collapse, the only question is what will cause it first, rot or a good storm.


Unless, of course, the guy maintains it.

Even if it collapses on him during a storm, though, it doesn't look substantial enough to seriously injure him.  He's not going to be crushed under thousands of pounds lumber, sheetrock, and shingles like I would be if my house collapsed.
 
2013-03-04 09:20:34 AM

dittybopper: manimal2878: This thing is guaranteed to collapse, the only question is what will cause it first, rot or a good storm.

Unless, of course, the guy maintains it.


Expanding upon this thought, I don't think it's supposed to be a permanent, immovable shelter like a "house" is generally considered to be.  It's more like a rigid tent, a temporary structure.  I doesn't appear to be that his intent is for it to last 30 years, probably no more than a year or two until he tears it down and moves on.  In that case, building like that is a viable option for a solitary adult person willing to take the risks.
 
2013-03-04 09:27:43 AM

dittybopper: OK, so he spends $100 on food a month.

That's about $23.52 a week, $3.36 a day, and if he's eating 3 meals a day, about $1.12 per meal.  That's "Ramen noodles, with some purchased veggies and occasionally some canned fish" level of eating.  Don't forget he doesn't really have any way to prepare an elaborate meal, so while you may be able to cook something that cheap but more healthy at home, he doesn't have the ability to do that.

Also, I wonder like AverageAmericanGuy:  If he's spending $250 a month, where is that coming from?


He has a garden at his house it looks like.  If he planted nothing but zucchini or cucumbers, he could probably grow a few metric tons of it in a plot that size for $2 in seeds.

/Still have 6 quarts of pickles left from the summer- only planted 6 cucumber plants.
 
2013-03-04 09:32:23 AM

dittybopper: Even if it collapses on him during a storm, though, it doesn't look substantial enough to seriously injure him. He's not going to be crushed under thousands of pounds lumber, sheetrock, and shingles like I would be if my house collapsed.


How much weight does a piece of jagged OSB need to stab you in the face and kill you?  Not much.

And then, even if you survive, you just hang out exposed to the storm until it ends?  Yeah, that sounds pleasant and safe.
 
2013-03-04 09:37:10 AM
FTA: "-Building cost: $1000 (for house), $1000 (for 300W photovoltaic power generation system)"
-Utilities: no electricity supplying (photovoltaic power generation), no water supplying (drawing by myself near the house), bathroom (handmade), no shower room (a public bathhouse), internet (mobile datacard), drainage (handmade)
-Living cost: $250/month ($100 for food expense, $50 for taxes, $50 for communication expense, $50 for others"


So for $2,000 upfront and $250 a month, he lives in this tarp on a trailer and scoots around everywhere (a 300 watt PV system seems a bit overkill):

assets2.motherboard.tv

If he were just to live in his mom's basement for another couple months or get a temp job, he could buy something similar to this for a little bit more, $5,000, and live in much greater comfort and be able to see a lot more (a mid 70's Morgan 30):
www.sailboatlistings.com

It doesn't require gasoline to move around, no monthly taxes need to be paid, comes with a bed, couch, kitchen, dining table and toilet. And depending on where you anchor, most of your meals are caught fresh and also free.
 
2013-03-04 09:39:52 AM

dittybopper: I don't think it's supposed to be a permanent, immovable shelter like a "house" is generally considered to be. It's more like a rigid tent, a temporary structure. I doesn't appear to be that his intent is for it to last 30 years, probably no more than a year or two until he tears it down and moves on. In that case, building like that is a viable option for a solitary adult person willing to take the risks.


It may be that his intent is for a temporary structure, but it's still not safe.  The solar panels I have seen are heavy, he has one of these mounted on top of his roof that is only supported by a 2x4 every 4 feet, even without the panels up there, the broad expanse of the building side creates a big area with wind to push against and the lack of beams means it can twist and collapse much easier than it should.    My opinion is that for something to be viable, it must be safe, whether permanent or temporary.
 
2013-03-04 09:42:20 AM
At least he's not a damned squatter. (the other, fuglier type of anti-materialist)

His $3000/year living expenses could easily be made from web-design. He has the technology.
 
2013-03-04 09:50:33 AM

manimal2878: Tom_Slick: manimal2878: And then when you see that a place like this looks like it was transported from a shanty town slum and will end up in your yard in anything greater than a light rain shower, you see why the DIY tiny house concept is legislated out of possibility in 99% of the USA.

While it is true you can not live in a shack and be with in 200 miles of a reasonably sized town, in most of the country, you can indeed build a small square footage house almost anywhere.  You will have to have a bathroom though.

Not legally.  For unpermitted structures you are usually limited to about 120 sq feet, and must call it a shed, and cannot hook up water or electricity to it.


(((SNIP))

That part varies from state to state, county to county.  Here, we can go up to 200 sq feet no permit, no inspection.  We're considering a cluster of small buildings each below that limit.

Where the family's place is in ONT (CA) the limit is 100 sq feet, leading to a lot of companies producing "bunkies" :  8x12 free-standing bedrooms.
 
2013-03-04 09:54:37 AM

Gough: Here, we can go up to 200 sq feet no permit, no inspection.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but technically its not a habitable structure that you are building right?
 
2013-03-04 09:56:22 AM

ModernLuddite: I do not know about Japan, but the issue with this type of ideal lifestyle is land usage. Parking that thing anywhere, for any amount of time would be a crime.

Maybe the Japanese are less "get off my property", but I doubt it. They live on an island.

//I would love to see public bath houses in North America, though.
///North Americans need to learn to God damned shower more, and allow the homeless/poor to shower, too.


If you go to Ueno Park in Tokyo, you'll see some nice temples, a zoo, feral cats, and a thriving blue tarp community in the woods. Last time I was there, there were a couple hundred Blue tarp residences set up in the woods. Some of them are pretty big. From what I understand, they are like little villages, heirarchy, culture, support systems.
 
2013-03-04 10:10:02 AM
t1.gstatic.com
 
2013-03-04 10:11:23 AM

weirdneighbour: [t1.gstatic.com image 335x150]


Forgot to add , good movie.
 
2013-03-04 10:26:16 AM

Jorn the Younger: The distict lack of public bathhouses in the US would make the no-running-water issue rather more difficult for people who remain employed.  Also, the domocil cost $1000 in building supplies, and he built it himself, so no labor costs, but what about the land itself?  How much was that, or is he squatting on public land?  Living on his parents estate? What?


there's no public gyms in America to shower? That explains the obesity
 
2013-03-04 10:32:08 AM

manimal2878: Gough: Here, we can go up to 200 sq feet no permit, no inspection.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but technically its not a habitable structure that you are building right?


I'm sure he's thinking of what's termed a "small accessory structure" including, barns, greenhouses & sheds. They are not allowed for habitation and have to meet proper property line setbacks. If you include a form of heating, they then have to submit for a mechanical permit and are required to have insulation. The rules are pretty standardized across almost all jurisdictions (pretty much anyone who's agreed to the 2009 International Residential Code) The Idaho City of Hayden has a nice page describing the rules.
 
2013-03-04 10:44:49 AM

manimal2878: dittybopper: Even if it collapses on him during a storm, though, it doesn't look substantial enough to seriously injure him. He's not going to be crushed under thousands of pounds lumber, sheetrock, and shingles like I would be if my house collapsed.

How much weight does a piece of jagged OSB need to stab you in the face and kill you?  Not much.


Actually, probably quite a lot.  I've had a nasty head wound.  Unless he were very unlucky, he'd be fine.  By  your standards, a tent with heavy wooden poles and a crossbeam would be just as dangerous.

Personally, though, I think he should have made a teepee.  When I was a kid, my dad and I built one out of left-over indoor-outdoor carpeting.   It was wind and weather proof, sturdy, warm in the winter with a small fire in the middle (or even a gas mantle lantern), and ridiculously easy to make.

And then, even if you survive, you just hang out exposed to the storm until it ends?  Yeah, that sounds pleasant and safe.

Pleasant?  No.  Safe?  Well he *MIGHT* get hit by falling trees, but that would happen if he were living in a tent anyway.  Lightning is another concern, but it's not like he's in additional danger outside the structure.

I've often looked at sheds like you can find at Lowes and Home Depot (like the 10x12 ones) and thought "If I didn't have a wife and a kid, I could live in something like that.  Small woodstove for heat, camp toilet, bed, table, and chair.  A photovoltaic/battery setup to run the computer, ham radios, and some LED lighting (perhaps with a secondary source, maybe a small steam engine operated generator for times when there isn't enough sunlight to charge up the batteries)

I could live like that, but only by myself.
 
2013-03-04 11:00:07 AM

dittybopper: manimal2878: dittybopper:

Actually, probably quite a lot.  I've had a nasty head wound.  Unless he were very unlucky, he'd be fine.  By  your standards, a tent with heavy wooden poles and a crossbeam would be just as dangerous.

Personally, though, I think he should have made a teepee.  When I was a kid, my dad and I built one out of left-over indoor-outdoor carpeting.   It was wind and weather proof, sturdy, warm in the winter with a small fire in the middle (or even a gas mantle lantern), and ridiculously easy to make.

And then, even if you survive, you just hang out exposed to the storm until it ends?  Yeah, that sounds pleasant and safe.

Pleasant?  No.  Safe?  Well he *MIGHT* get hit by falling trees, but that would happen if he were living in a tent anyway.  Lightning is another concern, but it's not like he's in additional danger outside the structure.

I've often looked at sheds like you can find at Lowes and Home Depot (like the 10x12 ones) and thought "If I didn't have a wife and a kid, I could live in something like that.  Small woodstove for heat, camp toilet, bed, table, and chair.  A photovoltaic/battery setup to run the computer, ham radios, and some LED lighting (perhaps with a secondary source, maybe a small steam engine operated generator for times when there isn't enough sunlight to charge up the batteries)

I could live like that, but only by myself.


You are being ridiculous and contrarion for some reason I cannot guess, his structure is not built safely, period.  A tent would be much safer, a piece of fabric does not weigh as much as plywood, nor is it ridid and able to become sharp.

You seem to fail to take into account the dangers of exposure when considering riding out the remainder of a storm after a structure collapse.  A house is not just protecting you from things falling on you, it is keeping you warm.

Any shed I have seen at the big box stores is built a thousand times better than that dude's shanty.  Some even have hurricane clips and metal straps.  Let me know if any of the sheds you find at Lowes or Home Depot are framed with 2x4s at 48" centers and then maybe what your defense of that guys building will not be blatantly ridiculous.
 
2013-03-04 11:37:54 AM

manimal2878: Gough: Here, we can go up to 200 sq feet no permit, no inspection.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but technically its not a habitable structure that you are building right?


If it's less than 200 ft^^2, they don't get involved.  If you want to live in it, that's your business, at as far as the building inspector is concerned.  Dealing with other inspections, like those by the plumbing and electrical inspectors, may require a little more... finesse.
 
2013-03-04 11:41:47 AM

manimal2878: Any shed I have seen at the big box stores is built a thousand times better than that dude's shanty. Some even have hurricane clips and metal straps. Let me know if any of the sheds you find at Lowes or Home Depot are framed with 2x4s at 48" centers and then maybe what your defense of that guys building will not be blatantly ridiculous.


As an aside, I friggen love Tuff Shed. They make excellent products that are affordable and extremely well built. My parents installed a couple of the smaller 8X10 sized pre-built sheds on their farm (which were just dropped off onto level gravel pads). I had them pre-fab and construct me a 20 x 24 shop with 9' ceilings, skylights, matching shingles to my house and even matched my gutters and paint. A great outfit to work with.

Here's a shot of the shop behind the house:
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
/unfortunately I screwed up and gave them roof overhang measurements that were 6" too short, making it not quite match the house, which was constructed 30 years earlier.
 
2013-03-04 11:43:25 AM

MrSteve007: manimal2878: Gough: Here, we can go up to 200 sq feet no permit, no inspection.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but technically its not a habitable structure that you are building right?

I'm sure he's thinking of what's termed a "small accessory structure" including, barns, greenhouses & sheds. They are not allowed for habitation and have to meet proper property line setbacks. If you include a form of heating, they then have to submit for a mechanical permit and are required to have insulation. The rules are pretty standardized across almost all jurisdictions (pretty much anyone who's agreed to the 2009 International Residential Code) The Idaho City of Hayden has a nice page describing the rules.


You're right about the "small accessory structure".  Interesting about the heating, since we haven't had that issue at all, even on larger (1000 sq ft) buildings.  Too lazy to dig out the IRC, but I wonder if the heat source has anything to do with that requirement.
 
2013-03-04 11:52:20 AM
that's nice!

and it will be the norm for 90% of Americans in 30 years if we keep giving everything to the Wealthy Cocks who own this Nation and its Government. Democracy be damned!


cheers!
 
2013-03-04 11:54:09 AM

Jorn the Younger: The distict lack of public bathhouses in the US would make the no-running-water issue rather more difficult for people who remain employed.  Also, the domocil cost $1000 in building supplies, and he built it himself, so no labor costs, but what about the land itself?  How much was that, or is he squatting on public land?  Living on his parents estate? What?


a $20/month gym membership takes care of the bathing issue. What would be a problem is making a permanent structure up to building code, or a mobile structure up to DOT compliance standards.
 
2013-03-04 12:01:18 PM

manimal2878: You are being ridiculous and contrarion for some reason I cannot guess,


I'm funny that way.

 his structure is not built safely, period.  A tent would be much safer, a piece of fabric does not weigh as much as plywood, nor is it ridid and able to become sharp.

Never seen a tent with a large, rigid wooden ridge pole?  I have (and slept in them).   

You seem to fail to take into account the dangers of exposure when considering riding out the remainder of a storm after a structure collapse.  A house is not just protecting you from things falling on you, it is keeping you warm.

Meh.  I've been winter camping.  In the Adirondacks.  With minimal equipment.

It takes hours for hypothermia to become a serious problem, and he's got a secondary shelter.  He doesn't live in a hurricane prone area.   No doubt, since the article didn't talk about a heat source for his shack, I have to assume that he mainly stays in warmer areas of Japan, or at least stays out of the mountains and away from Hokkaido in the winter. 

Any shed I have seen at the big box stores is built a thousand times better than that dude's shanty.  Some even have hurricane clips and metal straps.  Let me know if any of the sheds you find at Lowes or Home Depot are framed with 2x4s at 48" centers and then maybe what your defense of that guys building will not be blatantly ridiculous.

I think you might be mistaken:   Some of the framing looks like it's even closer than 16" ctc, but some is wider (like the door and window areas).  I don't see much that looks like it's 48" ctc, because the entire shack is probably only 4 x 8, and I count no fewer than 5 supports on each long side, which would average to 19.2" ctc.  Some appear to be closer, and some are wider, but I bet that what it averages to.

The widest area I could measure, assuming the frame before the sleeping loft was installed is 6 feet high, is roughly 24" ctc.  I may be off by +/- 6", but there is no way he built that with the frames at 48".

The only way it could average out to 48" ctc with the number of supports he has is if his shack is 20 feet long and 8 feet wide, which it plainly is not.
 
2013-03-04 12:02:44 PM
I love the concept of a small house.  While I wouldn't take it as far as this guy (seriously, I want a shower, and would prefer a washer/dryer), I'd be perfectly happy with a tiny place all my own. I love the sort of 'shipping container' houses you can buy from places, but always expected they wouldn't pass local code in a big city.  I'm single, etc. so wtf do I need a ton of space for? Most hobbies that aren't 'advanced carpentry shop' level of space requirements are small.

Though I strongly suspect that guy has more technology than he is letting on; the solar charger would likely run his laptop fine for a day, but there's no way he sits inside 24/7 and uses it, and there's not enough routine matinenance around his place to keep him busy.  There's some other thing(s) in play there, to consume his down time.
 
2013-03-04 12:08:13 PM

dittybopper: Some of the framing looks like it's even closer than 16" ctc, but some is wider (like the door and window areas). I don't see much that looks like it's 48" ctc, because the entire shack is probably only 4 x 8, and I count no fewer than 5 supports on each long side, which would average to 19.2" ctc. Some appear to be closer, and some are wider, but I bet that what it averages to.


Click 3 more pictures to the right.  Assuming that is a standard 4x8 sheet of plywood he is using for the sheathing. he appears to have each sheet supported by one 2x4 at each end.  Maybe I'm wrong, maybe plywood is smaller in Japan.
 
Displayed 50 of 87 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report