Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(LA Times)   911 dispatcher "Is there anybody that's willing to help this lady and not let her die?" Nurse at senior living center "Um, not at this time"   (latimesblogs.latimes.com) divider line 438
    More: Fail  
•       •       •

23535 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2013 at 9:13 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



438 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-03 09:42:13 PM  
http://comfortcarechoices.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=artic l e&id=59

How successful is CPR?
Myth: That CPR is a simple procedure to revive a stopped heart and helps most everyone.  This is a TV perpetuated myth as evidenced by one study which found that on three popular prime time TV shows, 75% of patients survived cardiac arrest with 67% leaving hospital. [Diem SJ, et al. NEJM 1996]

Reality: CPR is a harsh procedure usually incompatible with a peaceful death - for those adults in hospital who are over age 70, only 2-17% will survive to be discharged and half of them have a worsened quality of life or are worse than before being resuscitated and regret having CPR.  [(1) Murphy DJ.  Outcomes of CPR in the elderly. Ann Intern Med. 1989; (2) Waisel DB.  The CPR-not-indicated order:  futility revisited.  Ann Intern Med. 1995.  (3) Brindley PG. Predictors of survival following in-hospital adult CPR. CMAJ 2002.  (4) Peberdy MA. CPR of adults in the hospital. Resuscitation. 2003.  (5) Swor RA. Does advanced age matter in outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in community-dwelling adults? Acad Emerg Med. 2000.]

For those in nursing homes, the attempt to resuscitate has an even worse record with no one surviving in one large survey. [(1) Gordon M. Poor outcome of on-site CPR in a multi-level geriatric facility. J Am Geriatr Soc 1993.  (2) Benkendorf R. Outcomes of cardiac arrest in the nursing home: destiny or futility? Prehosp Emerg Care. 1997.]
 
2013-03-03 09:43:09 PM  
CPR is surprisingly not very effective:
"So, if an average adult keels over in the street, is found unresponsive and pulseless by a bystander, and is administered CPR while a 911 call is made, the odds that such a person will emerge from the eventualities of the resuscitation effort healthy and with a normally functioning brain are about 2%. "

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/06/cpr-effective.html
 
2013-03-03 09:43:59 PM  
*shakes fist at Kif_D*

Dammit, you beat me to hit :P
 
2013-03-03 09:44:16 PM  

djh0101010: The patient was breathing.  You only do CPR on a pulseless non-breather. CPR is not the right treatment for that situation.  Oxygen and maybe even to bag them, yes, but the nurse was completely correct not to start CPR on a breathing patient.


THIIIIISSSSSS
That was the first farking thing I thought when I read this article. Why in fark's name would you do CPR ON SOMEONE WHOSE HEART IS BEATING AND THEY ARE STILL BREATHING?
You DO NOT do chest compressions on someone whose heart is still beating!
You DO NOT do rescue breathing on someone who is still farking breathing on their own!

The funny part is, I haven't had a CPR course EVER and I farking know this!
 
2013-03-03 09:44:17 PM  
I smell attorneys.
Seas of Attorneys.
I hear their salivations.
The shuffling of papers.
Someone gunna get paid.
 
2013-03-03 09:45:24 PM  
So when the person stopped breathing/went unconcious the nurse still didn't perform CPR until the ambulance arrived.
Ridiculous, as, yes CPR has a low (1%) chance of revival on its own, the stuff the paramedics bring in returning a person to life to around 30-40% chance and CPR for 4 to 6 minutes keeps the body and brain oxygenated enough to allow for less overall damage to those organs.
FInally getting to the hospital, your rate of coming back can be raised to 80% and with the cryobaths and other treatment capacities they can mitigate a lot of damage to the body and brain after returning to a state of life.
CPR isn't really for reviving the corpse, its keeping the corpses organs alive long enough for the body to get to improved treatment facilities so that there is a greater capacity for the victim to be revived successfully and with less overall damage.

Whether or not the person would have survived at the hospital isn't the question, the real question is why the nursing home has the policy of not performing CPR, even when the victim does not have a DNR request on file. Also how does this nurse retain her credentials when she fails to perform her duties as a nurse regardless of the policies of the facility that she works at?
 
2013-03-03 09:45:47 PM  
Fell In Love With a Chair:
You DO NOT do chest compressions on someone whose heart is still beating!
You DO NOT do rescue breathing on someone who is still farking breathing on their own!

The funny part is, I haven't had a CPR course EVER and I farking know this!


Tell that to the seemingly 80% of Americans (and Fark posters apparently) who don't seem to understand this.
 
2013-03-03 09:45:48 PM  

gwendolyyyn: djh0101010: The patient was breathing.  You only do CPR on a pulseless non-breather.  CPR is not the right treatment for that situation.  Oxygen and maybe even to bag them, yes, but the nurse was completely correct not to start CPR on a breathing patient.

I was thinking that exact same thing...it said she was still breathing. Barely, but even so.


Enough of your "facts"!  This is FARK.
 
2013-03-03 09:46:00 PM  
I'm sure it's in the pamphlet. Now is it in back in fine print, or on the cover with a starburst graphic.

/some heirs might see it as a feature. Just sayin.

//a corrupt nursing home would want to keep them alive and sedate until the money is gone.
 
2013-03-03 09:47:03 PM  
If we're ever going to bring the population down this kind of "heartless callousness" is exactly what we need.

Of course we could teach and encourage birth control in schools starting in 6th grade and make sure abortion is safe, legal and easily obtainable on demand for every pregnant female. Oh, and "doctor assisted suicide," "death with dignity" and/or "voluntary euthanasia" might help too.

But failing those common-sensical measures, yeah, let's stand idly by while somebody's granny keels over. Maybe we can herd everybody over 50 into death camps (starting of course with me after friday). "Boots on the ground" anywhere Islam runs rampant would help too. We might also use subliminal programming to encourage people to gun down strangers at shopping malls, theaters and (even better) elementary schools. After all if we're not going to limit births we should encourage deaths, right? "Viva la muerte!"

I remember when the world's population hit 3 billion, 4 billion people ago; I was entering puberty then. Now I'm almost 50 and you breeders STILL haven't learned restraint. God must love stupid people, He increases them exponentially. After all when we've picked this planet clean we can just move the rich & famous to another planet a few hundred light-years away and start the cycle all over again. AMIRITE?!?!?!!?

/ Drunk and cynical. And constipated.
 
2013-03-03 09:47:04 PM  
thishumanscondition.files.wordpress.com

Dispatcher: "She could die."
Nurse: "Yeah, maybe..."
 
2013-03-03 09:47:48 PM  
If you've ever spent time around retirement homes and assisted living, you've detected the barely concealed contempt most people working there have for their charges.  Definitely a class thing.  They pretty much are all making this shiat wage to take care of these white hairs who are staying there for tons of money each year, decrepit and prompted to keep living deep into their eighties and nineties for no apparent reason.

Not saying it's right, but I'm less than shocked some nurse found a way not to save a life.  There's always waiting lists and more coming through the door.
 
2013-03-03 09:47:49 PM  

Fell In Love With a Chair: djh0101010: The patient was breathing.  You only do CPR on a pulseless non-breather. CPR is not the right treatment for that situation.  Oxygen and maybe even to bag them, yes, but the nurse was completely correct not to start CPR on a breathing patient.

THIIIIISSSSSS
That was the first farking thing I thought when I read this article. Why in fark's name would you do CPR ON SOMEONE WHOSE HEART IS BEATING AND THEY ARE STILL BREATHING?
You DO NOT do chest compressions on someone whose heart is still beating!
You DO NOT do rescue breathing on someone who is still farking breathing on their own!

The funny part is, I haven't had a CPR course EVER and I farking know this!


Actually, the National Institute of Health or whatever only says to avoid it if breathing is normal, or if there is coughing or movement.  I think instructions differ, though.

Anyway, all of this is hardly why the nurse wasn't doing anything.  The nurse was just afraid her boss would be mad.
 
2013-03-03 09:48:00 PM  

Acravius: So when the person stopped breathing/went unconcious the nurse still didn't perform CPR until the ambulance arrived.


Sorry, I missed this in the article. When was this said in the article/other articles? Thanks.
 
2013-03-03 09:48:23 PM  

NotoriousFire: Fell In Love With a Chair:
You DO NOT do chest compressions on someone whose heart is still beating!
You DO NOT do rescue breathing on someone who is still farking breathing on their own!

The funny part is, I haven't had a CPR course EVER and I farking know this!

Tell that to the seemingly 80% of Americans (and Fark posters apparently) who don't seem to understand this.


Heaven help us if we fall unconscious in public, this thread is scaring the shiat out of me!
 
2013-03-03 09:48:59 PM  

WhoGAS: Acravius: Here is CPR: 30 compressions 2 breaths,
                      Repeat 5 times in approximately 2 minutes
                      Assess patient for 10 seconds, listening/looking/feeling for pulse, breath or rise/fall in chest.
                      If no change, resume CPR
                      If AED is available then hook up AED, (Turn On, listen to instructions)
                      Shock, as advised by AED
                      After 3 shocks maximum
                      Assess Patient, as before
                      If no change Resume CPR 5 cycles per 2 minutes, repeat until more qualified personelle come on the scene.
Good Samaritan Laws protect people who use reasonable actions in performing these duties, regardless of outcomes.

So yes it could be instructed over the phone, and still be covered by the Good Samaritan Law.

You don't do breaths any more.


Yes, you do.  30 to 2 is the new standard.  The emphasis is on compressions, now, but breaths haven't been completely cut out, unless you don't feel comfortable doing them.
 
2013-03-03 09:49:06 PM  
I once was admitted to a hospital for what I thought would be 1 or 2 days. I was asked if I had a living will and did I want a dnr. I told them to keep me alive until my insurance was exhausted. I spent a month in that place and came out 60 lbs lighter and covered in bed sores..

Then I had to go back to that he'll hole and when they asked me the dnr question, I advised them to pull the plug immediately and OD me on morphine.

Life ain't that good.
 
2013-03-03 09:50:39 PM  

The One True TheDavid: But failing those common-sensical measures, yeah, let's stand idly by while somebody's granny keels over. Maybe we can herd everybody over 50 into death camps (starting of course with me after friday). "Boots on the ground" anywhere Islam runs rampant would help too. We might also use subliminal programming to encourage people to gun down strangers at shopping malls, theaters and (even better) elementary schools. After all if we're not going to limit births we should encourage deaths, right? "Viva la muerte!"


This would probably increase the population.
 
2013-03-03 09:51:41 PM  
The nurse needs to lose her license, and the facility needs some serious sanctions if not being shut down
 
2013-03-03 09:51:47 PM  

quizzical: Birnone: I wasn't aware that dispatchers could 'talk' you through CPR.  I thought people got certified in that, taking classes and such.

A nurse in a medical facility should already have that training.


Arguably an assisted living facility is not a medical facility (or more appropriately... a nursing facility). It's a place for people who need a little help, not full care or rehabilitation. Think of it as an apartment complex that cooks you food and has someone to pick you up if you fall in the shower.
 
2013-03-03 09:52:39 PM  
CPR doesn't work very well, not well at all.

Well, it does sometimes work - but does very little lasting good. IIRC, one month after having received CPR, less than 8% of of CPR recipients are alive, most of those are in a persistent vegetative state.

3% of CPR recipients have a good outcome one month out. 3 farking percent, and most of those aren't infirm nursing home patients.

/In this case, wouldn't have mattered, CPR doesn't work.
 
2013-03-03 09:52:45 PM  
Since I don't want my research to go to waste, here's a random quote:

"CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is an emergency lifesaving procedure that is done when someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped. This may happen after an electric shock, heart attack, or drowning."

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000010.htm
 
2013-03-03 09:53:28 PM  

RandomRandom: CPR doesn't work very well, not well at all.

Well, it does sometimes work - but does very little lasting good. IIRC, one month after having received CPR, less than 8% of of CPR recipients are alive, most of those are in a persistent vegetative state.

3% of CPR recipients have a good outcome one month out. 3 farking percent, and most of those aren't infirm nursing home patients.

/In this case, wouldn't have mattered, CPR doesn't work.


None of that being relevant to why this particular person did what they did.
 
2013-03-03 09:54:50 PM  

NotoriousFire: Since I don't want my research to go to waste, here's a random quote:

"CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is an emergency lifesaving procedure that is done when someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped. This may happen after an electric shock, heart attack, or drowning."

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000010.htm


Same site, under "adult":

If the person is not breathing or has trouble breathing:Cover their mouth tightly with your mouth.Pinch the nose closed.Keep the chin lifted and head tilted.Give 2 rescue breaths. Each breath should take about a second and make the chest rise.
 
2013-03-03 09:55:10 PM  
No good deed ever goes unpunished.
 
2013-03-03 09:55:41 PM  

Relatively Obscure: WhoGAS: You don't do breaths any more.

That isn't true everywhere.


True, only in the areas that adhere to the AHA guidelines.
 
2013-03-03 09:56:51 PM  

WhoGAS: Acravius: Here is CPR: 30 compressions 2 breaths,
                      Repeat 5 times in approximately 2 minutes
                      Assess patient for 10 seconds, listening/looking/feeling for pulse, breath or rise/fall in chest.
                      If no change, resume CPR
                      If AED is available then hook up AED, (Turn On, listen to instructions)
                      Shock, as advised by AED
                      After 3 shocks maximum
                      Assess Patient, as before
                      If no change Resume CPR 5 cycles per 2 minutes, repeat until more qualified personelle come on the scene.
Good Samaritan Laws protect people who use reasonable actions in performing these duties, regardless of outcomes.

So yes it could be instructed over the phone, and still be covered by the Good Samaritan Law.

You don't do breaths any more.


That's only in certain situations. There is a somewhat different technique to it as well, which is exhausting.  I think the Red Cross stopped teaching compression-only for basic cpr certification last year, as they found people with only that much training could get confused and use it when it wasn't appropriate.
 
2013-03-03 09:57:13 PM  

foxyshadis: Person: Wouldn't have helped, the patient was 87 and CPR wasn't the appropriate treatment. The family is fine with the care she received, so this seems like manufactured outrage.

But it was too much trouble for the reporter to ask if the 911 operator had a damn clue what they were talking about, or ask any other medical professional if it was appropriate. KGET is pandering and has a partial transcript of the panicky operator.


Yeah, she's getting a little full of herself, isn't she? Saying "are you going to let her die" is emotional blackmail. The old lady was dying suddenly, and it sure as hell wasn't the nurse's fault, but the 911 person was insinuating that it was. That's a terrible thing to do.
 
2013-03-03 09:57:48 PM  

catzilla: Relatively Obscure: WhoGAS: You don't do breaths any more.

That isn't true everywhere.

True, only in the areas that adhere to the AHA guidelines.


Yeah, I believe AHA says no breaths, while Red Cross and others say yes.  And the pros have gear that does a better job anyway.
 
2013-03-03 09:57:58 PM  

RandomRandom: CPR doesn't work very well, not well at all.

Well, it does sometimes work - but does very little lasting good. IIRC, one month after having received CPR, less than 8% of of CPR recipients are alive, most of those are in a persistent vegetative state.

3% of CPR recipients have a good outcome one month out. 3 farking percent, and most of those aren't infirm nursing home patients.

/In this case, wouldn't have mattered, CPR doesn't work.


Those numbers are from all incidents of type of arrest, including when the person's collapse wasn't witnessed, when CPR didn't start until first responders got there, etc.

Witnessed in-hospital and witnessed by medical professional have much higher rates of survival, somewhere around 20%.
 
2013-03-03 09:58:19 PM  
Fell In Love With a Chair:

The funny part is, I haven't had a CPR course EVER and I farking know this!

I can tell.

http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@ecc/documents/dow nl oadable/ucm_317350.pdf

Notice, that rescue compressions are appropriate even if the victim is "not breathing normally." For example with choking, you may be able to dislodge the blocking object with compressions.
 
2013-03-03 09:58:21 PM  

Acravius: So when the person stopped breathing/went unconcious the nurse still didn't perform CPR until the ambulance arrived.
Ridiculous, as, yes CPR has a low (1%) chance of revival on its own, the stuff the paramedics bring in returning a person to life to around 30-40% chance and CPR for 4 to 6 minutes keeps the body and brain oxygenated enough to allow for less overall damage to those organs.
FInally getting to the hospital, your rate of coming back can be raised to 80% and with the cryobaths and other treatment capacities they can mitigate a lot of damage to the body and brain after returning to a state of life.
CPR isn't really for reviving the corpse, its keeping the corpses organs alive long enough for the body to get to improved treatment facilities so that there is a greater capacity for the victim to be revived successfully and with less overall damage.

Whether or not the person would have survived at the hospital isn't the question, the real question is why the nursing home has the policy of not performing CPR, even when the victim does not have a DNR request on file. Also how does this nurse retain her credentials when she fails to perform her duties as a nurse regardless of the policies of the facility that she works at?



Unconscious has nothing to do with CPR.  There is nothing in the article that I read that says the patient actually stopped breathing at the facility.

re: credentials:  Generally speaking (and each state is different) nurse practice acts declare what you are legally capable of doing, not what one should do in a situation.  Facility rules and procedures trump practice acts so long as facility rules do not force one to violate practice acts.  Sounds like in this case, they have an R2 or R2 on site somewhere who is supposed to be doing these kinds of things.

It's very easy to jump on the bandwagon here, but there is quite a bit of data missing.
 
2013-03-03 09:58:31 PM  

Birnone: I wasn't aware that dispatchers could 'talk' you through CPR.  I thought people got certified in that, taking classes and such.

I'm guessing further information will show that the 87 year old resident had other issues that would have made it a moot point anyways.  It's not like simply doing CPR saves everyone.


I found a guy lying next to my neighbor's house (it was the pest control guy).  No pulse, no breathing, no heartbeat, ashen gray in color.  911 dispatcher talked me through CPR (had never done it before, but sort of new the basics) which I performed on the guy until the EMTs arrived.

Dude died.
 
2013-03-03 09:59:35 PM  

Relatively Obscure: NotoriousFire: Since I don't want my research to go to waste, here's a random quote:

"CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is an emergency lifesaving procedure that is done when someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped. This may happen after an electric shock, heart attack, or drowning."

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000010.htm

Same site, under "adult":

If the person is not breathing or has trouble breathing:Cover their mouth tightly with your mouth.Pinch the nose closed.Keep the chin lifted and head tilted.Give 2 rescue breaths. Each breath should take about a second and make the chest rise.



Guess it depends on your definitions of "barely breathing" and "has trouble breathing." Clearly we and every other armchair nurse in here know far better than the nurse on-scene, right?

Still think if something was fishy with the way this whole thing went down, the family would be out for money from the home. They're already guaranteed the inheritance - why not go for the extra if something was odd with what the nurse did? Sounds like a non-issue.
 
2013-03-03 09:59:57 PM  

chookbillion: Yeah, she's getting a little full of herself, isn't she? Saying "are you going to let her die" is emotional blackmail. The old lady was dying suddenly, and it sure as hell wasn't the nurse's fault, but the 911 person was insinuating that it was. That's a terrible thing to do.


Withholding care when you're technically a medical professional is a kind of a terrible thing to do.
 
2013-03-03 10:01:13 PM  

Gulper Eel: If I'm reading this bit on the California good samaritan law correctly, it looks to me that the nursing home could've been sued to the eyeballs - not for trying the CPR, but if something else went wrong somewhere along the line.


That's my thought too.

The home is trying to save itself from lawsuits, which is a sad fact in today's world.
 
2013-03-03 10:03:06 PM  

NotoriousFire: Guess it depends on your definitions of "barely breathing" and "has trouble breathing." Clearly we and every other armchair nurse in here know far better than the nurse on-scene, right?


I don't know, but nothing indicates that the patient's condition was motivating her actions except for talking on the phone.  The rest was "it's not our policy to do that."  Which it sounds like is true.

NotoriousFire: Still think if something was fishy with the way this whole thing went down, the family would be out for money from the home. They're already guaranteed the inheritance - why not go for the extra if something was odd with what the nurse did? Sounds like a non-issue.


There may or may not be people in my family to whom I'd have different reactions to different levels of care.
 
2013-03-03 10:03:18 PM  
Recently did a networking project for a nursing home chain.  All I can say is, please bring on the death panels.  Because at the point that I need to be put in one of those places, I would rather be dead on my own terms.
 
2013-03-03 10:03:19 PM  
ByOwlLight:
Withholding care when you're technically a medical professional is a kind of a terrible thing to do.

But the issue here is CPR wasn't appropriate, and likely wouldn't have done squat, anyway.  I mean, what next, you yell at the tow truck driver for not jump starting your car when it has a flat tire?
 
2013-03-03 10:03:22 PM  
finnished:
http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@ecc/documents/dow nl oadable/ucm_317350.pdf

Notice, that rescue compressions are appropriate even if the victim is "not breathing normally." For example with choking, you may be able to dislodge the blocking object with compressions.


From your article, "not breathing normally" is defined as "ie, not breathing or only gasping." Barely breathing doesn't really sound like either of the two. I know you weren't connecting your point to the article, I'm merely pointing this out.
 
2013-03-03 10:03:34 PM  

FarkinSneakyBastage: Can I please have the freedom to choose how and when I die and not rot to death in one of these depressing shiatholes they call a retirement community? That'd be great, thanks


Take up smoking.
 
2013-03-03 10:03:35 PM  

Relatively Obscure: None of that being relevant to why this particular person did what they did.


If the reporting is accurate - the only relevant issue is that the 911 dispatcher should never have told the nurse to start CPR on a person who was still breathing.

If the reporting isn't accurate and the patient wasn't breathing, the nurse still shouldn't have performed CPR, because it rarely works on healthy young people, let alone nursing home patients.
 
2013-03-03 10:03:36 PM  

Fell In Love With a Chair: djh0101010: The patient was breathing.  You only do CPR on a pulseless non-breather. CPR is not the right treatment for that situation.  Oxygen and maybe even to bag them, yes, but the nurse was completely correct not to start CPR on a breathing patient.

THIIIIISSSSSS
That was the first farking thing I thought when I read this article. Why in fark's name would you do CPR ON SOMEONE WHOSE HEART IS BEATING AND THEY ARE STILL BREATHING?
You DO NOT do chest compressions on someone whose heart is still beating!
You DO NOT do rescue breathing on someone who is still farking breathing on their own!

The funny part is, I haven't had a CPR course EVER and I farking know this!


Actually you can.  Slightly bruised and alive is better than dead.  Every time. Right now, at least where I am it's if there's no breathing you don't even bother checking for a pulse you just go for the compressions. The problem is people like YOU scaring off passer-bys through indecision.  Even if you're having trouble telling whether they're breathing or not go for it.  It's not going to make dead any worse.

Yeah, CPR has a 2% survival rate if the person is found unconscious.  2% is better than 0%.  JUST DO IT.
 
2013-03-03 10:04:20 PM  
I hope that nurse dies slowly, in full view of people unwilling to help her.
 
2013-03-03 10:04:29 PM  
I'm guessing that the "nurse" in the facility really isn't a nurse.
 
2013-03-03 10:05:02 PM  

PsychoPhil: But the issue here is CPR wasn't appropriate, and likely wouldn't have done squat, anyway. I mean, what next, you yell at the tow truck driver for not jump starting your car when it has a flat tire?


I fail to see how it wasn't appropriate.  "She was old" is not a good enough answer.
 
2013-03-03 10:05:44 PM  

JMacPA: Yeah, CPR has a 2% survival rate if the person is found unconscious. 2% is better than 0%. JUST DO IT.


2% to 3% on a average human, not a health compromised nursing home patient.

As was posted above, one study found ZERO instances of success when performing CPR on nursing home patients.  Zero isn't better than 0%, it is 0%.
 
2013-03-03 10:05:58 PM  
I'm surprised everyone is jumping to the liability thing.  By the way the management stressed that they are an independent living facility and the daughter, who is a nurse, said she was satisfied with the care her mother received... I would say its more likely this residence was chosen because she did not, in fact, want to be surrounded by nurses etc all the time.  Its likely the "nurse" isnt an actual nurse at all.
 
2013-03-03 10:06:02 PM  

RandomRandom: If the reporting is accurate - the only relevant issue is that the 911 dispatcher should never have told the nurse to start CPR on a person who was still breathing.


Some institutions clearly indicate that CPR should be started if the person has difficulty breathing.

RandomRandom: If the reporting isn't accurate and the patient wasn't breathing, the nurse still shouldn't have performed CPR, because it rarely works on healthy young people, let alone nursing home patients.


I don't understand how 'rarely works' is a good reason, unless it works far less than doing nothing.
 
2013-03-03 10:06:11 PM  
Obamacare
 
Displayed 50 of 438 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report