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(Daily Mail)   Florida girl who flipped the bird to a judge gets applause in court after finishing prison term. Next up: agent, book tour, reality show   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 108
    More: Followup, contempt of courts, Miami, WSVN, drug charges, Penelope Soto  
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15414 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2013 at 9:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-03 12:06:51 PM
I'm polite in court and get a foot up my 455... men with money and women with looks get over
 
2013-03-03 12:19:21 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.


Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.
 
2013-03-03 12:26:20 PM

Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.


Oh, no doubt.  But I treat people with respect all the time, and I know to be especially sycophantic to cops, judges, and others who have the power to fark me over - because they really enjoy using that power, and will do so with no provocation other than someone appearing to be insufficiently servile.

Sad, but true.
 
2013-03-03 12:28:42 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Xanax is evil.

Ban it!


Ban Snort it!
 
2013-03-03 12:38:20 PM
Time for her to move on to the next obvious career move

/Octomom needs a AW Padawan
 
2013-03-03 12:38:38 PM
Of course, being the farking Daily Fail, there are roughly 47 pictures for a goddamn simple story that needs about 4.
 
2013-03-03 12:40:42 PM
I'm sure Rick Ross will take her on tour.
 
2013-03-03 12:42:33 PM
She is a slow learner with poor self control. Things will not go well for her.
 
2013-03-03 12:48:51 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.

Oh, no doubt.  But I treat people with respect all the time, and I know to be especially sycophantic to cops, judges, and others who have the power to fark me over - because they really enjoy using that power, and will do so with no provocation other than someone appearing to be insufficiently servile.



You tangle with enough judges to paint that broad of a stroke?  Something tells me you have a pretty loose interpretation of the word respect if you feel the need to be especially sycophantic.  You'll notice that on shows like COPS, the idiots putting 'sir' after everything they say are always the slimiest of balls.
 
2013-03-03 12:50:53 PM

bighairyguy: dobro: So, another successful beatdown into submission and repression. (sigh). Like "breaking" a horse.

More like another druggie learning how to play the system. I suspect we'll hear from her again.

/I'd like to be proven wrong though


A person can learn a lot from other inmates.
 
2013-03-03 12:53:36 PM

Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.


So she deserved to be put in jail without a trial for being rude?
 
2013-03-03 12:57:46 PM
#1)  As a result, the disrespectful teen was held in contempt of court and sentenced to 30 days in prison,WSVNreported.

I doubt it was prison, jail perhaps but not prison. a) Prison is a far different thing and reserved for those that are judged to need it for terms over a year or so. b) It would take more than five days just to get her out of prison.  Not an easy process with LOTS of paperwork.  So, NOT PRISON jail maybe.  Luckily she dodged Juvie which can be the worst on a kid.

#2) we're now wowed by her submission to the old fat white guy system?  Yassir, Nahsir?  Never submit to bullschitt.

A little revolution is a good thing now and again.
OTOH, It may have been an eye opener for her.
Time will tell.

Coming from a Cool Hand Luke kinda guy with authority respect issues
 
2013-03-03 01:01:42 PM

Benjamin Orr: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.

So she deserved to be put in jail without a trial for being rude?



Yep, contempt of court.  I know, I know...waahhhh! somewhere there's consequences for being rude!!
 
2013-03-03 01:03:06 PM
This isn't about caving in to authority, it's about demonstrating that you're not the center of the universe, i.e. a rude, selfish coont.

Being respectful before a judge is a good indicator of having this capicity. Looks to me she needed a reminder and the judge did a good job.
 
2013-03-03 01:07:14 PM

SilentStrider: I'm sure Rick Ross will take her on tour.


Hallelujah.
 
2013-03-03 01:11:21 PM

NameDot: I'm polite in court and get a foot up my 455... men with money and women with looks get over


Stay out of court, 455.
 
2013-03-03 01:19:24 PM

Abox: Benjamin Orr: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.

So she deserved to be put in jail without a trial for being rude?


Yep, contempt of court.  I know, I know...waahhhh! somewhere there's consequences for being rude!!


You sound like a good little Nazi.
 
2013-03-03 01:21:33 PM

Kinan: This isn't about caving in to authority, it's about demonstrating that you're not the center of the universe, i.e. a rude, selfish coont.

Being respectful before a judge is a good indicator of having this capicity. Looks to me she needed a reminder and the judge did a good job.


Looks like the judge was just another guy with issues who decided to abuse his authority.
 
2013-03-03 01:28:09 PM

Veramar: styckx: Eh.. She's a kid. We were all assholes at that age..

A kid? She's 18 years old and supposedly an adult.


Yeah, because the exact day that you turn 18, you magically transform into an instant adult. In reality, 'kid' applies until kids are about 25, and in the case of my brother in law, it looks like it's gonna be more like 40...
 
2013-03-03 01:30:20 PM

Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.

Oh, no doubt.  But I treat people with respect all the time, and I know to be especially sycophantic to cops, judges, and others who have the power to fark me over - because they really enjoy using that power, and will do so with no provocation other than someone appearing to be insufficiently servile.


You tangle with enough judges to paint that broad of a stroke?  Something tells me you have a pretty loose interpretation of the word respect if you feel the need to be especially sycophantic.  You'll notice that on shows like COPS, the idiots putting 'sir' after everything they say are always the slimiest of balls.


I don't tangle with judges.  I do talk to them as a matter of course in my job, and as part of a political committee that decides whether to endorse them during their campaigns.  I talk to cops regularly, too.  And politicos of all stripes.  I'm always respectful, it's my Southern upbringing.  But I know to send the message, "I defer to you" to people with power.  It's just how it works, if you don't want to get farked over.

But feel free to assert our own power around them when they have power over you.  See how that works out for ya.
 
2013-03-03 01:34:13 PM

megarian: StoPPeRmobile: Xanax is evil.

Ban it!

Ban Snort it!


Lose your car keys!
 
2013-03-03 01:43:07 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.

Or just treat people in general with respect, that way you don't have to remember to abruptly change your behavior for an authority figure. I guarantee the judge in this case wasn't the first person to be confronted with this rude biatch's attitude but he may have been the first who could do something about it.

Oh, no doubt.  But I treat people with respect all the time, and I know to be especially sycophantic to cops, judges, and others who have the power to fark me over - because they really enjoy using that power, and will do so with no provocation other than someone appearing to be insufficiently servile.


You tangle with enough judges to paint that broad of a stroke?  Something tells me you have a pretty loose interpretation of the word respect if you feel the need to be especially sycophantic.  You'll notice that on shows like COPS, the idiots putting 'sir' after everything they say are always the slimiest of balls.

I don't tangle with judges.  I do talk to them as a matter of course in my job, and as part of a political committee that decides whether to endorse them during their campaigns.  I talk to cops regularly, too.  And politicos of all stripes.  I'm always respectful, it's my Southern upbringing.  But I know to send the message, "I defer to you" to people with power.  It's just how it works, if you don't want to get farked over.

But feel free to assert our own power around them when they have power over you.  See how that works out for ya.


So that makes it ok and all of those judges are normal people worthy of our respect?
 
2013-03-03 02:01:17 PM
Who then, in your humble estimation is worthy of your respect?
Seems like it's a real personal thing with you, despite not knowing the judge personally.
 
2013-03-03 02:05:58 PM

Kinan: Who then, in your humble estimation is worthy of your respect?
Seems like it's a real personal thing with you, despite not knowing the judge personally.


Putting somebody in jail without a trial for giving you the finger is wrong. No matter who is being flipped off.

What is so hard to understand?

If somebody flipped off Obama or Bush do they deserve 30 days in jail?
 
2013-03-03 02:14:06 PM
Sigh. Ask your mom about contempt of court.
 
2013-03-03 02:14:10 PM

Benjamin Orr: Kinan: This isn't about caving in to authority, it's about demonstrating that you're not the center of the universe, i.e. a rude, selfish coont.

Being respectful before a judge is a good indicator of having this capicity. Looks to me she needed a reminder and the judge did a good job.

Looks like the judge was just another guy with issues who decided to abuse his authority.


It seems to be he used his authority exactly as it was meant to be used.  There are procedures and standards of acceptable behavior inside of a courtroom that are designed to make the process move as smoothly as possible for everyone involved.  When you are appearing in court being accused of committing a crime it's in your own best interests to limit your vocabulary to 'yes your honor' and 'no your honor'.  If the judge asks you a direct question and your lawyer does not step in to answer, answer it honestly and concisely.  This whole situation stemmed from when the judge asked her the value of her jewelry in order to help determine her assets to set a proper bond, and she laughed off the question.  Had she just answered 'I'd estimate its worth to be about $3,000' (or whatever other amount) she wouldn't have had the problem.  She made it worse by flipping him off and cursing.  There are certain places where that language isn't appropriate, court is one of them.
 
2013-03-03 02:17:16 PM
She's pretty.
 
2013-03-03 02:36:29 PM

Kinan: Sigh. Ask your mom about contempt of court.


Sigh. Derp derp derp.

Think for a seond and ask yourself if contempt of court should be punishable by instant jail time with no jury.
 
2013-03-03 02:37:33 PM
Reading this thread is teaching me a lot. Authority figures who use power are actually just flaunting it and are all scumbags.

So does that make all bosses scumbags? Go ahead and flip off and cuss out your boss and see how that works for all of you.  Are there some who would get over it and who you would absolutely love because they "respected" you as a person? i'm sure there will be some people who will follow it up with that and they may even be true. For the other 95% of us, you have a degree of respect you have to show your superiors or you will get fired and lose your job.

This judge didn't put her in jail for 3 decades. He didn't lock her up and throw away the key. He knows the system better than anyone and knew that she would be out within a week. He sent a message to this girl about how you needed to act in a courtroom. And for that he's a scumbag.

On the other side of the coin, she's a tramp who will end back up in court after 2 weeks and she's "fooled" the judge by a tearful apology. Therefore, how stupid are the sheep to applaud her actions.

I know this is Fark. I get it and am ok with it. I'm just not sure what the big deal is here from either party.

The judge had not only the right to do what he did, but I think he acted fairly. The girl might be pulling a fast one on the system. Of course, if she is, she'll be back in jail and prison if she continues her drug spiral.   I'm still for applauding her for her change in demeanor. If she is trying to go on the right path, it makes her feel good which is a good thing. if she's playing the system, she won't be impacted by silence or clapping so it makes no difference in the grand scheme of things.
 
2013-03-03 02:37:53 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Benjamin Orr: Kinan: This isn't about caving in to authority, it's about demonstrating that you're not the center of the universe, i.e. a rude, selfish coont.

Being respectful before a judge is a good indicator of having this capicity. Looks to me she needed a reminder and the judge did a good job.

Looks like the judge was just another guy with issues who decided to abuse his authority.

It seems to be he used his authority exactly as it was meant to be used.  There are procedures and standards of acceptable behavior inside of a courtroom that are designed to make the process move as smoothly as possible for everyone involved.  When you are appearing in court being accused of committing a crime it's in your own best interests to limit your vocabulary to 'yes your honor' and 'no your honor'.  If the judge asks you a direct question and your lawyer does not step in to answer, answer it honestly and concisely.  This whole situation stemmed from when the judge asked her the value of her jewelry in order to help determine her assets to set a proper bond, and she laughed off the question.  Had she just answered 'I'd estimate its worth to be about $3,000' (or whatever other amount) she wouldn't have had the problem.  She made it worse by flipping him off and cursing.  There are certain places where that language isn't appropriate, court is one of them.


Seriously?
 
2013-03-03 02:39:05 PM
So many facists in this thread.
 
2013-03-03 02:45:53 PM
So many entitled snowflakes w/authority issues in this thread.
So Again, Mr. Orr, who is worthy of your respect?
 
2013-03-03 02:53:32 PM

Benjamin Orr: So many facists in this thread.


(Reaches down, pinches cheek)

Ooooh, you are so cute!

/fascist
 
2013-03-03 03:08:08 PM

Benjamin Orr: Kinan: Who then, in your humble estimation is worthy of your respect?
Seems like it's a real personal thing with you, despite not knowing the judge personally.

Putting somebody in jail without a trial for giving you the finger is wrong. No matter who is being flipped off.

What is so hard to understand?

If somebody flipped off Obama or Bush do they deserve 30 days in jail?


So flipping off the president is the same as disrupting a court?
So by your logic, the judge has to let anyone and everyone speak, and do their protests... so how does the court ever actually get anything done?
Sounds like typical Farker logic.
 
2013-03-03 03:09:07 PM

Benjamin Orr: Kinan: Sigh. Ask your mom about contempt of court.

Sigh. Derp derp derp.

Think for a seond and ask yourself if contempt of court should be punishable by instant jail time with no jury.


Yes it should
What's your next question?
 
2013-03-03 03:09:08 PM
Is there anyway I can arrange a threesome between the rehabilitated Penelope and that female news anchor?

If anyone knows, let me know.
 
2013-03-03 03:15:12 PM
Personally, I think that if you are going to court on drug-related charges and you farking show up in the courtroom STONED on said court date, you should get a mandatory 30 days+rehab right there because your legal survival instinct has obviously taken a hike and your common sense has gone with it.

/Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son...
 
2013-03-03 03:55:24 PM
Having worked in the law enforcement arena for 20 years, I would say...trust, but VERIFIED.
Yes, she made it through the system, now, she will need to be supervised for a while to see if
she falls back with the same crowd & goes back to her old ways.  Also, her parents need to
watch her like a hawk.
I pray she isn't dazzled by idiots wanting to throw money at her for book rights, tv shows,
"playboy" etc.  Leave this girl alone and out of the press would give her a better chance of
escaping the "drug culture".
Hope someone does a follow up story in 6 months & 1 year later.
 
2013-03-03 04:50:22 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: Benevolent Misanthrope: Abox: SpdrJay: So, the moral of the story is that if you PRETEND to suck up to people in authority, you will be applauded by those same people....


Psst...people in authority don't care if you're pretending or sincere as long as they go home without a headache.

Addendum: ...as long as they go home without a headache and with the firm conviction that everyone around them is inferior.


Are we talking about authority or hipsters?  I'm pretty sure feeling superior transcends every societal strata. As does wanting to go home without a headache.

Yes - but when dealing with people in authority, one should always remember that these traits are foremost.  They are not there for the public good, or to do the right thing, no matter what they said during their campaign or what their official bio says.  They are there to feel powerful, and they'll royally fark anyone who doesn't kiss their ass sufficiently.  Remember this, and act accordingly.


And nothing like stereotyping to make you feel superior, right?
 
2013-03-03 05:09:09 PM
Didn't the supremes say it was a protected form of expression? Or does it only apply to cops and below?

Good girl, now sue the crap out of him for violating your rights to free speech with prison time.
 
2013-03-03 05:31:16 PM
Hook her up with Butthole Tattoo Girl and they can make a buddy-movie together
 
2013-03-03 05:53:05 PM

Mega Steve: Hook her up with Butthole Tattoo Girl and they can make a buddy-movie together


Yes, please.
 
2013-03-03 06:03:12 PM
It is funny, I was recently won an award at work, 80 people were chose from around the world, out of 15000, for being the best of the best in the company.

I have a flawless resume and work experience spanning six continents.  So I apply for a management position, one of 9 that came open.  Did not even get the interview.

But of the 9 who did 1 has a felony arrest from 2011 for stealing 5k in cash from his grandmother and another has 3 duis in three different states.  When I pointed this out I was told "people deserve second chances."  I agree with this, but what about those of us who do not fark up?

Judge did the right thing by scaring the shiat out of the girl, but the 30 days would have probably done her better than his later giving her a pass on the sentence, because it showed her she can cry and bat her eyes, and get out of trouble.

Actions should have consequences.
 
2013-03-03 06:19:23 PM

Benjamin Orr: So that makes it ok and all of those judges are normal people worthy of our respect?


Of course not.  But as you grow up, you'll realize that there are situations where reason doesn't work.  So you do what's necessary to get out of there with as little damage as possible.
 
2013-03-03 06:29:15 PM

ReverendJynxed: Didn't the supremes say it was a protected form of expression? Or does it only apply to cops and below?

Good girl, now sue the crap out of him for violating your rights to free speech with prison time.


The issue isn't that she swore at and flipped off a judge, it's that she did so in court.  If she had sworn at and flipped off the bailiff, prosecutor, defense attorney, another defendant, or some random person in the gallery she could have been just as guilty of contempt as if her response was directed at the judge.

Basically, just don't raise a ruckus or disrupt the proceedings in an illegitimate way when you're in a courtroom.
 
2013-03-03 07:23:03 PM
Ah, the thread where farkers normally in favor of nanny state government shake their collective fists against
an authoritarian judiciary.
 
2013-03-03 07:33:41 PM

theflatline: It is funny, I was recently won an award at work, 80 people were chose from around the world, out of 15000, for being the best of the best in the company.

I have a flawless resume and work experience spanning six continents.  So I apply for a management position, one of 9 that came open.  Did not even get the interview.

But of the 9 who did 1 has a felony arrest from 2011 for stealing 5k in cash from his grandmother and another has 3 duis in three different states.  When I pointed this out I was told "people deserve second chances."  I agree with this, but what about those of us who do not fark up?

Judge did the right thing by scaring the shiat out of the girl, but the 30 days would have probably done her better than his later giving her a pass on the sentence, because it showed her she can cry and bat her eyes, and get out of trouble.

Actions should have consequences.


But it's good that you're not bitter.
 
2013-03-03 07:38:43 PM

misanthropic1: theflatline: It is funny, I was recently won an award at work, 80 people were chose from around the world, out of 15000, for being the best of the best in the company.

I have a flawless resume and work experience spanning six continents.  So I apply for a management position, one of 9 that came open.  Did not even get the interview.

But of the 9 who did 1 has a felony arrest from 2011 for stealing 5k in cash from his grandmother and another has 3 duis in three different states.  When I pointed this out I was told "people deserve second chances."  I agree with this, but what about those of us who do not fark up?

Judge did the right thing by scaring the shiat out of the girl, but the 30 days would have probably done her better than his later giving her a pass on the sentence, because it showed her she can cry and bat her eyes, and get out of trouble.

Actions should have consequences.

But it's good that you're not bitter.


I am not bitter, because I roll with the punches, the award helped me gain employment for twice the pay with another firm who recognized my hard work.  However, it is funny that I put my nose to the grindstone and was overlooked because one of the upper management thinks she can do what she want, and I was begged to stay and then only offered the management job when I tendered my resignation.

When I asked about it when they finally offered me a position I was told "well we like to give minorities a chance and you as a caucasian have undue advantages."  Ironically I am jewish, spanish, black, and italian, which is all quite evident by looking at me.  But you know do not judge a man by his merits, or the color of his skin.
 
2013-03-03 09:54:23 PM

maggoo: She learned that cynicism is the key to avoid punishment, and that the US judicial system is a sham that values cheap cynical displays of atonement instead of actually upholding justice and rehabilitating criminals.


She's reformed if she's learned to play by the rules.
 
2013-03-04 03:24:39 AM
 
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