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(Chicago Sun-Times)   Chicago alderman tells Salvation Army they can no longer feed the homeless in his district because it encourages the homeless to stay   (suntimes.com) divider line 110
    More: Asinine, Salvation Army, Ald, North Side, Cappleman, Chicago, chicken or the egg, uptown  
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5228 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Mar 2013 at 8:49 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-02 03:31:41 PM  
Well that is true. It's not like the homeless go home at night and stay off the streets. There is a reason they are called homeless.
 
2013-03-02 03:44:35 PM  
Less private charity, more patronage jobs to pass out.
 
2013-03-02 03:45:31 PM  
That's how Jesus would have done it.

Since, you know, America is a "Christian" nation and everything...
 
2013-03-02 04:51:09 PM  
Ok, first I expected this to be my alderman but it wasn't. So I've got that going for me.

Uptown has a lot of problems, and the Salvation Army isn't one of them. There are food banks and missions all over that neighborhood; there's deep generational poverty right on the edges of gentrified neighborhoods. There is an enormous population of people on the sex offender registry there because there are a few half-way houses (back when no one wanted to live there it seemed a good idea). There is an unexpectedly large population of Native Americans there, and the attendant substance problems that go with that. My guess is that his next move will be to try to get zoning to kick out a lot of these people so he can make way for more gentrification.
 
2013-03-02 05:21:19 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Well that is true. It's not like the homeless go home at night and stay off the streets. There is a reason they are called homeless.


That's a rather simplistic view of homelessness. Homeless people aren't just the guys sleeping on the street. They're also the folks in the beat up RV in the parking lot of the abandoned store, or squatting in an empty building, or living in a short term hotel.
 
2013-03-02 05:24:08 PM  
Uptown has its problems but just pushing services to another area won't help the underlying cause. It would make sense if they had something else in place before they stop the food trucks rather than just saying they are working on other services.

How many homeless people were actually traveling to Uptown to visit the Salvation Army trucks? Maybe it was just getting all the neighborhood homeless in one place at one time. If that's the case, then they are seriously underestimating the need.

What is more surprising is that the article was actually well written, full of facts and they got quotes from everyone involved. Kind of like what newspaper articles used to be like.
 
2013-03-02 05:45:21 PM  
the article doesn't mention what party affiliation (if any) the alderman in question has....is he Republican?
 
2013-03-02 05:56:34 PM  

Weaver95: the article doesn't mention what party affiliation (if any) the alderman in question has....is he Republican?


HAHAHAH HAHAHAH HAHAH AHAHHA HAHHAHA HAHAHAH HAH AHAHAHA
There are no GOP alderman.
We only have one election these days.
 
2013-03-02 06:18:49 PM  

Vodka Zombie: That's how Jesus would have done it.

Since, you know, America is a "Christian" nation and everything...


And the Salvation Army is a church.
 
2013-03-02 07:18:15 PM  
So many empty homes. So many homeless people. It sucks that we have to have two mutually exclusive problems.
 
2013-03-02 07:25:51 PM  

jaylectricity: So many empty homes. So many homeless people. It sucks that we have to have two mutually exclusive problems.


In order to preserve our economic integrity, it's better that people should go without shelter and that empty homes should be left to rot.  if we helped out the homeless, gave them shelter...that would be immoral and unethical.  letting empty homes and properties decay into uselessness and eventual destruction preserves our economic system from abuses.

we MUST protect the investments of the richest among us.  if we don't, then we'll all die.  I mean that literally - helping the poor will MURDER us all in our sleep.  Just ask Fox News and Rush Limbaugh.  helping the poor is MURDER.
 
2013-03-02 08:43:13 PM  
They really need to institute a Trap-Neuter-Return program
 
2013-03-02 08:56:48 PM  

Weaver95: the article doesn't mention what party affiliation (if any) the alderman in question has....is he Republican?


Chicago actually did away with party elections because, as was mentioned, there are no Republicans in Chicago.  Seriously.  When they did have party elections years ago, the Democratic primary winner was always the general election winner so no one ever cared about the Republican primary or the general election.  So they eventually said screw it and just did away with them in favor of a nonpartisan election.
 
2013-03-02 08:58:57 PM  

Weaver95: the article doesn't mention what party affiliation (if any) the alderman in question has....is he Republican?


Nope, a Democrat.  But both parties hate the poor, because both parties are the rich. The Democrats just have better spin control on their efforts to liquidate them.
 
2013-03-02 09:00:21 PM  
What is the "asinine" for? The homeless guys who are all flowing in for the hand-outs?  I have no problem with this situation.  If you like it then lure the homeless to your street and feed them there.  No dout it will make the neighborhood much nicer.
 
2013-03-02 09:00:43 PM  

Weaver95: jaylectricity: So many empty homes. So many homeless people. It sucks that we have to have two mutually exclusive problems.

In order to preserve our economic integrity, it's better that people should go without shelter and that empty homes should be left to rot.  if we helped out the homeless, gave them shelter...that would be immoral and unethical.  letting empty homes and properties decay into uselessness and eventual destruction preserves our economic system from abuses.

we MUST protect the investments of the richest among us.  if we don't, then we'll all die.  I mean that literally - helping the poor will MURDER us all in our sleep.  Just ask Fox News and Rush Limbaugh.  helping the poor is MURDER.


If you want to help the poor, nothing is stopping you. Go for it!
 
2013-03-02 09:02:11 PM  
Related nCSB I guess: does it make me a shiatty person to be sick of bums? There's a 711 a block or so down, I stop there basically daily for my coke/sugar fix. I'd say about 4/7 days there's a guy asking for change outside (they rotate, though there's only 3-4 of them). We have several homeless shelters within a few blocks.

But I've just gotten sick of not being able to go in and grab something without either being 'accosted' (look, it's inflamatory but I couldn't think of a simple single-word for 'hassled and asked when I'm already pissed off) for change, or feeling like a jerk for not giving them money (or buying them food, they've started just asking if you would buy them a hot dog or soda).

Is beggar fatigue a reasonable thing, when it's nearly every day? I'm not spitting on the guys, but I am avoiding the stores they frequent, and just going the extra half mile to one they don't stand in front of (it's also on my way).
 
2013-03-02 09:03:05 PM  
If you want to get rid of the homeless population from a community, this sounds like only a temporary solution.
What is needed is a final solution.
We need to make sure the poor and homeless have jobs to go to everyday regardless of their condition.
With jobs, they will make money.
And their work will set them free.
And maybe they'll even get a shower at the end of the day.
 
2013-03-02 09:05:19 PM  
 
2013-03-02 09:06:55 PM  
Do alderman even have this authority?
 
2013-03-02 09:09:17 PM  

Ima4nic8or: What is the "asinine" for? The homeless guys who are all flowing in for the hand-outs?  I have no problem with this situation.  If you like it then lure the homeless to your street and feed them there.  No dout it will make the neighborhood much nicer.


You don't understand. Someone ELSE was doing something both benevolent and difficult. That's the best possible scenario, and now it's RUINED!
 
2013-03-02 09:10:33 PM  
Damn aldermen...

a2.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
2013-03-02 09:11:30 PM  

aevert: Do alderman even have this authority?


Alderman can and will do whatever they can get away with; authority has fark-all to do with it. And they get away with quite a biatchicago politics is a very sad state of affairs.
 
2013-03-02 09:12:34 PM  

Ryker's Peninsula: If you want to get rid of the homeless population from a community, this sounds like only a temporary solution.
What is needed is a final solution.
We need to make sure the poor and homeless have jobs to go to everyday regardless of their condition.
With jobs, they will make money.
And their work will set them free.
And maybe they'll even get a shower at the end of the day.


I used to have an arrangement like this, trading a job for food and a place to stay. Then Ft. Sumter and it was all downhill from there.
 
2013-03-02 09:12:36 PM  
Sweet filter pwnage.
 
2013-03-02 09:14:07 PM  

Ryker's Peninsula: If you want to get rid of the homeless population from a community, this sounds like only a temporary solution.


But this is the solution since day one.
NIMBY

given the number of homeless in chicago, I am going to guess that there isnt that much migration to uptown.
My guess is that there are tons of homeless in uptown and the SA is bringing food to where the need is.
I have some recollection of there being a bunch of methadone clinics in the area.
 
2013-03-02 09:15:24 PM  

ongbok: This is interesting. From his webpage.


In addition to his work in the 46th Ward, James continues to advocate for families throughout the city as an active board member of Annie's Legacy, a Southside not-for-profit organization that empowers women who have experienced abuse and poverty . In 1987, he co-founded a homeless shelter that provided care for people living with HIV/AIDS and for three years served as chair of the Illinois' National Association of Social Workers' HIV Task Force. A licensed clinical social worker, James has worked in the healthcare field to improve communication among doctors, patients, and families. He also has had training in research that focused on improving the delivery of healthcare.

You would figure that a licensed social worker wouldn't get rid of a service that is helping to do some of the stuff he specialized in. But I guess when the money from the developers talks, the bullshiat has to walk.


Idunno, maybe tackling all the problems at once was too much.
 
2013-03-02 09:16:48 PM  
farm9.staticflickr.com

Simpsons did it!
 
2013-03-02 09:20:11 PM  

joshiz: Uptown has its problems but just pushing services to another area won't help the underlying cause.


Hey, it worked for Edgewater. We had a bunch of winos wandering the streets. Then they voted the ward dry. Now all the winos are in Uptown. Tag, you're it. You just have to figure out how to drive them into Lakeview and eventually they will be setting up camp in city hall.
 
2013-03-02 09:24:55 PM  
We have a similar problem in Portland.

We (rightly) budget pretty heavily for homeless services. We've built a number of city-funded shelters, upped the amount of services provided and brought in a number of organizations to add to these government funded efforts.

So Portland becomes a premier destination for homeless people all up and down the west coast. A few of them live behind my building, under the 405 viaduct (to keep out of the rain). Every single one of them is from somewhere else; Seattle, Santa Cruz, San Diego... All of them will flat out tell you that they came to Portland because of the services and the fact that the police don't fark with them the same way as happens in most other towns.

What is a city to do? Services for the homeless are funded because Portland wants to take care of our most vulnerable citizens (something I agree with wholeheartedly), but once those services get up and running, the city gets flooded with residents from other areas who heard rumors of how great Portland is. This taxes our services and increases crime within our native homeless population. For a while, we even had a homeless gang that centered in the downtown core area (where most of the shelters and services are located) and they actively beat up other homeless guys and told them to move 10 blocks in any direction so the gang could capitalize on the services offered.

Dealing with the homeless is far more complex than most people think and is fraught with serious unintended consequences.
 
2013-03-02 09:27:53 PM  

Ryker's Peninsula: If you want to get rid of the homeless population from a community, this sounds like only a temporary solution.
What is needed is a final solution.
We need to make sure the poor and homeless have jobs to go to everyday regardless of their condition.
With jobs, they will make money.
And their work will set them free.
And maybe they'll even get a shower at the end of the day.


What an idea... I wonder why it's never been tried before. Maybe some European socialist party could experiment with it.
 
2013-03-02 09:31:18 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Well that is true. It's not like the homeless go home at night and stay off the streets. There is a reason they are called homeless.


The idea is to make one's area unpalatable to the homeless so they move elsewhere.

It does nothing about the problem but it makes the area in question better.
 
2013-03-02 09:31:47 PM  

calbert: [farm9.staticflickr.com image 500x358]

Simpsons did it!


California, is cool to the homeless... Californyanya, super nice to the homeless...
 
2013-03-02 09:35:15 PM  
It's true...the homeless also like to chew on the wiring in your car and homes.
 
2013-03-02 09:35:18 PM  

dr-shotgun: We have a similar problem in Portland.

We (rightly) budget pretty heavily for homeless services. We've built a number of city-funded shelters, upped the amount of services provided and brought in a number of organizations to add to these government funded efforts.

So Portland becomes a premier destination for homeless people all up and down the west coast. A few of them live behind my building, under the 405 viaduct (to keep out of the rain). Every single one of them is from somewhere else; Seattle, Santa Cruz, San Diego... All of them will flat out tell you that they came to Portland because of the services and the fact that the police don't fark with them the same way as happens in most other towns.

What is a city to do? Services for the homeless are funded because Portland wants to take care of our most vulnerable citizens (something I agree with wholeheartedly), but once those services get up and running, the city gets flooded with residents from other areas who heard rumors of how great Portland is. This taxes our services and increases crime within our native homeless population. For a while, we even had a homeless gang that centered in the downtown core area (where most of the shelters and services are located) and they actively beat up other homeless guys and told them to move 10 blocks in any direction so the gang could capitalize on the services offered.

Dealing with the homeless is far more complex than most people think and is fraught with serious unintended consequences.


1.) Conduct survey of homeless population to determine their cities of origin.
2.) Bill cities of origin by headcount for solving their homeless problems.
3.) Probably not all that much profit, but at least it's a try.
 
2013-03-02 09:38:39 PM  
This just in, Chicago's homeless move to a different district....
 
2013-03-02 09:48:56 PM  
I can relate to this "solution"... When I lived in downtown Phoenix, there was a church directly across the street that was handing out meals on Sunday afternoons. Just Sunday, mind you, no other day of the week. I constantly had to run a gamut of crack dealers and homeless people to get into my apartment building. For added fun, I would sit on the top floor of the building, in the shadows, and pop the dealers with my BB gun...

Anyway, this church was operating this soup kitchen without proper permits, and the city eventually shut it down. It was like a light switch got thrown. Almost immediately, the street cleaned up. The homeless numbers dropped to almost zero, and the dealers dropped to about 10 percent of what they'd been.

It sucks, but it made it easier to get in my apartment complex alive. The homeless weren't the problem, it was the drug dealers who were hanging out to sell to them that was the problem.
 
2013-03-02 09:51:48 PM  
Let me guess...Uptown...

~click~

Yup.
 
2013-03-02 09:53:05 PM  
Salvation Army has changed its mind, decided to say "fark you" to  alderman.
 
2013-03-02 09:56:01 PM  

Chthonic Echoes: dr-shotgun: We have a similar problem in Portland.

We (rightly) budget pretty heavily for homeless services. We've built a number of city-funded shelters, upped the amount of services provided and brought in a number of organizations to add to these government funded efforts.

So Portland becomes a premier destination for homeless people all up and down the west coast. A few of them live behind my building, under the 405 viaduct (to keep out of the rain). Every single one of them is from somewhere else; Seattle, Santa Cruz, San Diego... All of them will flat out tell you that they came to Portland because of the services and the fact that the police don't fark with them the same way as happens in most other towns.

What is a city to do? Services for the homeless are funded because Portland wants to take care of our most vulnerable citizens (something I agree with wholeheartedly), but once those services get up and running, the city gets flooded with residents from other areas who heard rumors of how great Portland is. This taxes our services and increases crime within our native homeless population. For a while, we even had a homeless gang that centered in the downtown core area (where most of the shelters and services are located) and they actively beat up other homeless guys and told them to move 10 blocks in any direction so the gang could capitalize on the services offered.

Dealing with the homeless is far more complex than most people think and is fraught with serious unintended consequences.

1.) Conduct survey of homeless population to determine their cities of origin.
2.) Bill cities of origin by headcount for solving their homeless problems.
3.) Probably not all that much profit, but at least it's a try.


You poor thing.  Was it brain damage or were you born this way?
 
2013-03-02 10:02:12 PM  
There's no point in a continuing a cycle of drug addiction, craziness and homelessness. Make the only possible place to get food a treatment program. Feeding winos, junkies and zipperheads on the street every day just gives them another day of addiction and/or insanity with begging, prostitution and crime their full time job which degrades the quality of life for everyone in the neighborhood. It's the law of unintended consequences, doing more bad while you think you're doing good.
 
2013-03-02 10:14:44 PM  

findthefish: It's true...the homeless also like to chew on the wiring in your car and homes.


I know I shouldn't laugh, but I did.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Posted this to his Facebook page. Probably won't help, but it's something, I guess.
 
2013-03-02 10:15:25 PM  
Of course this is a faster and easier (non)viable option.

www.tshirtbordello.com
 
2013-03-02 10:22:57 PM  
They don't need food.  They need U-Hauls.
 
2013-03-02 10:26:30 PM  
As the Salvation Army mobile outreach unit tapers off, we are working with other social service agencies to try a new approach that we believe will be more effective with empowering these individuals experiencing homelessness to get out of the cycle of homelessness.

Well, since it's against the law to just shoot them and most folks have this thing against extermination camps, why not treat them like sex offenders and make it impossible for them to live anywhere near anybody? That ought to clear these undesirables out of the city limits.

If only there were some big, self contained places for the mentally ill of them. Kind of like the old State Mental Hospitals Pres. Reagan shut down, claiming we had advanced beyond them -- when he just wanted to trim the budget.

Could we reopen them? Not exactly. The majority, having been abandoned for 25 years have deteriorated to the point where it would be cheaper to tear them down and rebuild -- but construction costs since they were originally built have more than quadrupled and then quadrupled again.

Plus, all of the trained staff was fired. Cuts to the mental health system discourage more staff being trained.

Not to mention that some institutions no longer exist, having been cheaply bought, bulldozed and turned into developments then sold for astronomical prices. (Which contributed to the housing boom and bust.)

The US has over 300,000 empty homes slowly rotting away, but most mortgage owners will not sell them at a loss. Many put them up for bidding at auction, and the new buyers 'flip' them after a bit of work and make a nice profit.

Most will simply rot to the point of falling down.

It's not acceptable to give or cheaply rent these homes to homeless who could, just by living in them, keep them intact. An abandoned house starts to deteriorate within one year of vacancy.

So, you have these 'surplus' people, most of whom are mentally or physically ill or both. After being treated like shiat by everyone else and each other, they're not very acceptable to polite society. They dirty up the parks and scenery. No one gives a shiat about their hopes and dreams, their previous lives or their stories.

Life is hard. Get over it.

Now, the Soviets had 'work camps' for undesirables. They sent such folks to them, along with criminals, where they worked hard for state supplied room, board, health care, clothing and were productive.

Of course, usually the camps were in nearly inhospitable areas and many occupants were worked to death, but, hey, it got them off the streets.

Our clever ad executives could design and name similar camps to sound much better. However, since we have very little undeveloped land and none of it is in a real killing environment it might be better to bring back a version of the old Deep South Work Crews AKA 'Chain Gangs'. Complete with unheated and uncooled bare barracks, basic facilities and tough guards.

That would make the homeless productive, get them off the street and out from those abandoned building and cardboard boxes. It would be good for the economy. Cheap labor. Not to mention the whole spectrum of possible graft and corruption for self serving politicians.

I mean, Hitler found solutions for unwanted people surplus. His entire nation agreed. Some of our predominate leaders of his time agreed also.

Of course, in a way, it all started by making excuses to get the undesirables out from underfoot of the desirables. Kind of like what is starting now in the US.

Though, we'll never build death camps. That's inhumane. Instead we'll gradually push the homeless into the wilds or ghettoes, where they'll die quicker, out of the line of sight of the 'right' people.

Like sex offenders.

Make them somebody else's problem. You've trouble enough with your investments, choosing cell phone apps and deciding what car to lease every two years. Don't forget you've got to get that new, $2500 flat screen TV, decide which smoothie to make and select a nice cut of fish, which is fast approaching the price of Gold.

Life is so hard.
 
2013-03-02 10:27:58 PM  
Good riddance.

The Salvation Army ran a huge bunk-house a few blocks from me (Chicago South Loop).  Around the same time every evening, and every morning, the neighborhood would be swarming with beggars.

For $5 and the willingness to listen to a preacher for an hour, they'd get a place to sleep, and sometimes food as well!

SA supports and enables vagrancy.
 
2013-03-02 10:54:50 PM  
farm1.staticflickr.com

That's how it all started...
 
2013-03-02 10:58:15 PM  
Hey, we can give the homeless his house, problem solved.
 
2013-03-02 10:58:40 PM  
Stray dogs do that too, but nobody gets mad at them.
 
2013-03-02 10:59:24 PM  
Two years ago when I moved to Chicago from Kentucky I chose to live in Uptown because it was up and coming and inexpensive.  I can't say I had the opportunity to vote for Cappleman, but given any chance in the future I would without any hesitation.  You can find him walking the streets and talking with his constituents several times a week (in an area that isn't exactly safe to do such a thing) and has done many things prior, more corrupt, alderman have done in the ward.  He's been attacked, threatened, and his office has been vandalized and he still is trying to outreach to the community.

This article goes into more detail than I ever could about what he is doing for the area:

http://www.uptownupdate.com/2013/03/mark-brown-alderman-is-dangerous -a nd_2.html

As a former friar himself, I don't see the man being short on compassion.
 
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