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(ESPN)   University of Alabama spends $9 million on a new state-of-the-art A) research facility, B) lecture hall, or C) weight room for the football team   (espn.go.com) divider line 11
    More: Asinine, University of Alabama, Alabama, tides, T.J. Houshmandzadeh, state-of-the-art, Nick Saban, weight trains, junior college  
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1361 clicks; posted to Sports » on 02 Mar 2013 at 7:10 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-02 07:34:14 PM  
2 votes:
So , the fact that The Univ of Alabama built a 23 million dollar Research and Development wing and a 19 million Dollar Language institutes wing, that shouldn't get in your way. Go ahead morons.
2013-03-02 09:36:46 PM  
1 votes:
Bank Roll Tide?
2013-03-02 09:19:58 PM  
1 votes:

Happy Hours: Rodeodoc: Most Tier 1 college football programs are huge profit centers for the university.  Their revenues support most of the other college sports programs, especially those mandated by Title IX.  Not much of  a revenue stream from women's rowing.  And although I DNRTFA, I suspect the funds came from a grateful rich alumnus who values sports over education.



fixed


Rich alumni who value their own entertainment over other peoples education.

/count me in
2013-03-02 08:56:17 PM  
1 votes:

Rodeodoc: Most Tier 1 college football programs are huge profit centers for the university.  Their revenues support most of the other college sports programs, especially those mandated by Title IX.  Not much of  a revenue stream from women's rowing.  And although I DNRTFA, I suspect the funds came from a grateful rich alumnus who values sports over education.



fixed
2013-03-02 08:46:54 PM  
1 votes:

Mentat: ElwoodCuse: Only the top 20 or so athletic departments in college sports turn a profit. The Texases and Ohio States and such. Every other one is a money loser.

No, not every other one.  Before their move to the SEC, Missouri and Texas were the only profitable AD's in the Big XII.  I believe Kansas State is now also profitable.  Both Mizzou and Kansas State achieved that by being pragmatic with their money.


I don't know if this is the case for all schools, but I do know that many schools don't include big ticket items like new stadiums in yearly budgets.  I remember seeing numbers from what the University of Minnesota athletic department claimed to spend and bring in, and it never included the hundreds of millions of dollars spent on the stadium, which came from a different money source.  I'm sure that Alabama athletics would be profitable no matter how you did the math, but if I had to guess, I'd say that there are maybe 20 ADs in the nation that turn a profit over time if you include everything.

The real problem for me is this:

The public often ends up paying for athletics at schools that don't turn a profit (at state schools anyway).  But as soon as athletic departments make money, its all "hey, we are making money, so we get to spend it on more athletics".  So losses are funded by the public, while gains are mostly kept by athletic departments.  I'm not a big fan of that.

Plus, you have arms races where less successful schools that don't make money on athletics have to spend big to even keep up with the successful schools like Alabama.  Really the top tier of college sports should include about 50 schools, and the rest should be in some other tier that isn't expected to really compete or spend as much, but whatever.

But really, as people have said, the problem is at less successful schools, not the Alabamas of the world.
2013-03-02 07:51:13 PM  
1 votes:
If submitter is desperate for something to get outraged about, he could try to argue that smaller schools without the alumni base MAY use general school funds to upgrade facilities to try to keep pace with the D-1 facilities arms race... But probably not.

As has been said in this thread several times, major college sports programs are financially independent from their schools.  Academics are free to dream that the money alumni donate to sports would otherwise be donated to education, but we all know the reality.

Most athletic departments end up donating very little direct cash to their schools.  However, success in sports has been proven to increase the number of future applicants to the school, which leads to both higher standards and an increased tuition and donor base.
2013-03-02 07:47:13 PM  
1 votes:
I am outraged that a research facility or lecture hall at the University of Alabama didn't make nearly as much money or gain as much attention as the National Championship Football team did.
2013-03-02 07:18:50 PM  
1 votes:

2wolves: Mentat: The athletic department is fiscally independent from the university for all intents and purposes.

So it's a football team with a university relationship.


Yep.  As long as we adhere to the facade of amateurism, that's what you get.
2013-03-02 06:41:59 PM  
1 votes:

Mentat: The athletic department is fiscally independent from the university for all intents and purposes.


So it's a football team with a university relationship.
2013-03-02 05:23:21 PM  
1 votes:
The athletic department is fiscally independent from the university for all intents and purposes.
2013-03-02 05:15:31 PM  
1 votes:
If you want a pro football team, you have to have pro football facilities.

The money was raised from outside sources. It isn't like they diverted classroom funds to the Athletic Department. This time.
 
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