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(The Atlantic)   45% of recent college graduates still live with their parents. The other 55% were unavailable due to no phone in their parents' basement   (theatlantic.com) divider line 80
    More: Fail, college graduate, basements, The Atlantic, graduates, parents  
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1322 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Mar 2013 at 2:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-02 12:38:12 PM
Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?
 
2013-03-02 12:53:12 PM

unlikely: Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?


Unless you were recruited straight out of college, yep.

Yay for me graduating during Clinton boom.
 
2013-03-02 01:13:24 PM
I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.
 
2013-03-02 01:25:27 PM
This is why I'm glad I never got a degree*.  I have my OWN basement to live in (thankyouverymuch)

*was too busy learnin to get one.
 
2013-03-02 01:59:44 PM

Ambivalence: This is why I'm glad I never got a degree*.  I have my OWN basement to live in (thankyouverymuch)

*was too busy learnin to get one.


Well, hooray for Charlotte. You must feel so proud.
 
2013-03-02 02:29:51 PM
45% of recent college graduates still live with their parents. The other 55% were unavailable due to no phone in their parents' basement The homeless shelter

/living in your parents basement is still living with your parents
 
2013-03-02 02:31:55 PM
Mrs. Henry & I have concluded that our "downscale" house will need a spare bedroom for one of our four kids.
"Sh*t happens" with a LOT more regularity these days.
 
2013-03-02 02:41:24 PM
But the economy is clearly getting better.

On the other hand I'm just wondering... When did it become taboo precisely to live with your parents? It used to be extremely common but now suddenly... it's a bad thing. If you are paying your bills and living your life, what difference does it make?
 
2013-03-02 02:53:10 PM

randomjsa: But the economy is clearly getting better.

On the other hand I'm just wondering... When did it become taboo precisely to live with your parents? It used to be extremely common but now suddenly... it's a bad thing. If you are paying your bills and living your life, what difference does it make?


Its uncannily North American too.
 
2013-03-02 03:02:39 PM

randomjsa: But the economy is clearly getting better.

On the other hand I'm just wondering... When did it become taboo precisely to live with your parents? It used to be extremely common but now suddenly... it's a bad thing. If you are paying your bills and living your life, what difference does it make?


I think it has to do with differing definitions of "adulthood."  In a lot of societies, adulthood begins when you get married, so you live at home until you get married.  In others, it's when you have kids, so even married couples will live with one set of parents until they begin their own family.  In the US, we see adulthood as beginning when you leave school and (presumably) get a job.  You're only really an adult if you can support yourself financially.  The implication being, that if you're living at home it's because you can't afford to support yourself, something that an "adult" should be able to do.

As for the post-graduation thing, I don't see the big deal.  I've known a lot of people who live at home for a few months while they look for jobs.  That age (assuming you have the family support) is one of the few times in your life when you're able to be picky about what job you take, so it can be better to hold out for something good rather than taking anything just to make ends meet.
 
2013-03-02 03:03:14 PM

Generation_D: I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.


It's the economy, moron.
 
2013-03-02 03:07:35 PM

randomjsa: On the other hand I'm just wondering... When did it become taboo precisely to live with your parents? It used to be extremely common but now suddenly... it's a bad thing. If you are paying your bills and living your life, what difference does it make?


When the powers-that-be realized such an economic event could lead to social shifts that help Americans break the cycle of debt which American obedience is built upon.
 
2013-03-02 03:07:47 PM
When I was 18 in 1979 I had a part time minimum wage job that easily covered my rent, food and utilities. There was no credit check when I rented a nice apartment in a good neighborhood.

Now a part time minimum wage job would pay for my food if I didn't eat out and that's about it. My credit sucks, because during a difficult period three years ago I was late twice paying a credit card bill by 2 weeks, so if I had to rent I would be screwed.

The world has gotten much harsher in the last 30 years.
 
2013-03-02 03:15:53 PM
As a college grad living with my parents, I'm getting a kick...

/Was working- in my field, even!- but was laid off in October
 
2013-03-02 03:17:21 PM

quickdraw: When I was 18 in 1979 I had a part time minimum wage job that easily covered my rent, food and utilities. There was no credit check when I rented a nice apartment in a good neighborhood.

Now a part time minimum wage job would pay for my food if I didn't eat out and that's about it. My credit sucks, because during a difficult period three years ago I was late twice paying a credit card bill by 2 weeks, so if I had to rent I would be screwed.

The world has gotten much harsher in the last 30 years.


It really has. What the boomer generation doesn't get when it dishes out the classic "just get a job" advice is that it hasn't been simple since maybe the late 70s. The jobs they could take to make ends meet have transformed into "39 hours and you're never going full-time" so companies can do away with the things that were available for our parents' generation (IE, decent pay, company health insurance, and even the faintest traces of company loyalty)
 
2013-03-02 03:18:44 PM
I'm three years out of college and a lot of people I know are still living with their parents. Sucks to graduate into "The Great Recession." More than a few of those people really DON'T want to be at home, but don't see any alternative right now. I know one guy who has tried to move out two or three times in the hope that temporary work will turn into long-term employment, but no luck so far.

I know at least one gal who's just decided that it makes a lot more financial sense to stay at home. She makes the same salary I do, pays no rent, but does pay all of her parent's utilities. That means something like $300 a month or so, and it sure makes her parents happy.
 
2013-03-02 03:31:56 PM

cptjeff: Generation_D: I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.

It's the economy, moron.


I'm sure its something.
 
2013-03-02 03:34:41 PM

Generation_D: I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.


My student loan payments were about $2,000/month. I owed more for my education than my parents did for their house. Paid off now, but that has more to do with luck and some manuvering I'm not terribly proud of.

And that was just for undergrad. My girlfriend owes over a quarter million for her master's degree.

I'm more surprised that 55% can afford to live away from home. That number seems very high to me.
 
2013-03-02 03:49:42 PM
I would like to see these statistics broken down by major.
 
2013-03-02 03:52:30 PM
Slavery. Keep voting republican, idiots.
 
2013-03-02 03:52:50 PM

Generation_D: I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.


No shiat.  I left home at 17 with no high school diploma.  It wasn't that tough.
 
2013-03-02 04:07:49 PM

Somaticasual: quickdraw: When I was 18 in 1979 I had a part time minimum wage job that easily covered my rent, food and utilities. There was no credit check when I rented a nice apartment in a good neighborhood.

Now a part time minimum wage job would pay for my food if I didn't eat out and that's about it. My credit sucks, because during a difficult period three years ago I was late twice paying a credit card bill by 2 weeks, so if I had to rent I would be screwed.

The world has gotten much harsher in the last 30 years.

It really has. What the boomer generation doesn't get when it dishes out the classic "just get a job" advice is that it hasn't been simple since maybe the late 70s. The jobs they could take to make ends meet have transformed into "39 hours and you're never going full-time" so companies can do away with the things that were available for our parents' generation (IE, decent pay, company health insurance, and even the faintest traces of company loyalty)


cripes, like 12% inflation for 6 years in a row in the mid 70s to early 80s wasn't a beatdown. And despite what your history books are claiming, the minimum wage of $2.25 an hour then did not buy you a comfortable apt. Full time at 2 minimum wage jobs could pay rent in a 1 room sh*thole but that was about it. Zero internet, no online anything, jobs were whatever local food joints had work or else some lucky guys worked construction or farming.

Education was probably cheaper because the boomers hadn't yanked funding away from that yet.

But an education was not a guarantee, it never is.

I whined about it in my early 20s too. Which only kept me back longer, i'd complain then go smoke bowls (always money for weed!) than actually try and think of a way out or up.
 
2013-03-02 04:14:24 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Generation_D: I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.

My student loan payments were about $2,000/month. I owed more for my education than my parents did for their house. Paid off now, but that has more to do with luck and some manuvering I'm not terribly proud of.

And that was just for undergrad. My girlfriend owes over a quarter million for her master's degree.

I'm more surprised that 55% can afford to live away from home. That number seems very high to me.


Where did you go to undergrad? I pay about 1/10 that amount.
 
2013-03-02 04:18:59 PM

unlikely: Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?


No. There were just jobs then.
 
2013-03-02 04:25:50 PM

goatleggedfellow: unlikely: Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?

No. There were just jobs then.


Your choice, work in the kitchen or work on the construction site. If you were lucky daddy had a job for you at the bank, if you were really lucky someone in your family had a union job and they might let you apprentice.

Midwest small town America late 1970s. Farms were going broke, in droves, and factories were already closing.

School was cheaper than now, but wages sucked too.

As usual, the only places doing alright were big cities and the coasts. None of which were close by.

Smoke weed, work a crappy job, tend bar for extra money, smoke more weed.

Honestly you guys might have it worse now, but don't cry about how impossible it is cause all you do is hold yourself down. Things will always suck somewhere or somehow.
 
2013-03-02 04:30:51 PM
Tracfone will keep you ahead of the bill collectors.
 
2013-03-02 04:32:47 PM

Generation_D: late 1970s


Grandpa wandered out of his room again.
 
2013-03-02 04:37:03 PM

EvilEgg: unlikely: Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?

Unless you were recruited straight out of college, yep.

Yay for me graduating during Clinton boom.


Here here!  And with a computer science degree to boot.

I think I'd probably kill myself if I was graduating today.
 
2013-03-02 04:44:11 PM

Generation_D: Somaticasual: quickdraw: When I was 18 in 1979 I had a part time minimum wage job that easily covered my rent, food and utilities. There was no credit check when I rented a nice apartment in a good neighborhood.

Now a part time minimum wage job would pay for my food if I didn't eat out and that's about it. My credit sucks, because during a difficult period three years ago I was late twice paying a credit card bill by 2 weeks, so if I had to rent I would be screwed.

The world has gotten much harsher in the last 30 years.

It really has. What the boomer generation doesn't get when it dishes out the classic "just get a job" advice is that it hasn't been simple since maybe the late 70s. The jobs they could take to make ends meet have transformed into "39 hours and you're never going full-time" so companies can do away with the things that were available for our parents' generation (IE, decent pay, company health insurance, and even the faintest traces of company loyalty)

cripes, like 12% inflation for 6 years in a row in the mid 70s to early 80s wasn't a beatdown. And despite what your history books are claiming, the minimum wage of $2.25 an hour then did not buy you a comfortable apt. Full time at 2 minimum wage jobs could pay rent in a 1 room sh*thole but that was about it. Zero internet, no online anything, jobs were whatever local food joints had work or else some lucky guys worked construction or farming.

Education was probably cheaper because the boomers hadn't yanked funding away from that yet.

But an education was not a guarantee, it never is.

I whined about it in my early 20s too. Which only kept me back longer, i'd complain then go smoke bowls (always money for weed!) than actually try and think of a way out or up.


Sure it wasn't all peachy back in the day, but it's relative. You didn't have internet, your parents didn't have a phone or a car. These new tools are necessary as the game changes and they cost money.

My generation is the first one predicted to not do as well as the previous. All told, we are more screwed than the generation before us. I've been laid off 5 times in 7 years and I've got friends who've had it worse.

I was told in my innocent youth that college as the way to success and financial security, so I went and studied the sciences. Turns out I was lied to. Not 30-something me, but young, innocent me who was told that the loans were worth it. Now I'm on the hook for the debt and the job market for my generation is crap. It sucks and I've got to dig my way out. But constantly screwing over the next generation as they start out their lives will not sustain a country. I have no problem using socialism as a wedge to get back what was taken from me in my inexperienced youth.

The kids you raise are the ones that take care of you in your fragile and defenseless old age. They are the ones at your bedside adjusting your pillow. How you treat them determines which side of your head they put the pillow on.
 
2013-03-02 04:45:53 PM

Pincy: Here here! And with a computer science degree to boot.


What does a CS degree even mean nowadays? I didn't even need one to get a programmer job back in '99. Now you have to have 10 years experience in 5 different languages to get an entry level gig.

/recovering software developer, video editor/VFX guy
 
2013-03-02 05:17:20 PM
This could be fixed by raising the minimum wage to $12 and hour and only allowing a companies controlling officers to draw their bonuses from money left over after paying federal taxes.
 
2013-03-02 05:21:03 PM

mrlewish: This could be fixed by raising the minimum wage to $12 and hour and only allowing a companies controlling officers to draw their bonuses from money left over after paying federal taxes.


Because Lord knows you can't do it on your own.
 
2013-03-02 05:24:31 PM

Nemo's Brother: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Generation_D: I had no idea that many people were incapable of paying rent and working and paying down a school loan at the same time. You guys are amazing. Have a trophy.

My student loan payments were about $2,000/month. I owed more for my education than my parents did for their house. Paid off now, but that has more to do with luck and some manuvering I'm not terribly proud of.

And that was just for undergrad. My girlfriend owes over a quarter million for her master's degree.

I'm more surprised that 55% can afford to live away from home. That number seems very high to me.

Where did you go to undergrad? I pay about 1/10 that amount.


A private college. My 18-year-old self made some mistakes, changed majors and also took out private loans with several different lenders.

So it was only $400/mo, but for each lender each month. Consolidation was not really an option either. So I grinned and bore it. Got it all paid off finally last year but I got lucky.

From what I understand my situation is not that uncommon either.
 
2013-03-02 05:26:08 PM
Poor snowflakes.
 
2013-03-02 05:39:01 PM

TheSwizz: I would like to see these statistics broken down by major.


this
stats are useless without breakdowns
 
2013-03-02 05:46:14 PM
The real problem is that there really aren't any jobs out there FOR new college grads.

The vast majority of positions that would have been aimed at new bachelor degrees no longer exist, because the recession has spoiled companies for choice. There are loads of un- and under-employed competitors that also want those jobs, so now every resume needs to have years of experience in the field, which is completely unattainable to new graduates.

Full-time positions are an endangered little money as legally possible and for as little benefits as legally possible. Companies have a historically high war chest of cash, but it's not going to the employees; it's going to the leadership and to the lobbyists to ensure that we never return to an age when a high school graduate could expect to get a job, buy a house, and start a family with little difficulty. Nowadays, you can't reasonably expect to do any of that without a multi-thousand-dollar investment in college, and then adding the gamble of picking a field that isn't going to get outsourced or otherwise make it hard for you to find work.

/it's a rigged game
 
2013-03-02 05:47:36 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505145_162-57325132/25-college-majors-wit h -the-highest-unemployment-rates/

QUICK!
How can you tell that the IDIOT who made this top 25 list doesnt actually know how to count to 25?!!

They list more than 25 degrees and put the ties on the same line item.
SO top 29 degrees ....

http://graphicsweb.wsj.com/documents/NILF1111/#term= 
173 degrees
income ranges, popularity and unemployment 
YAY DATA
 
2013-03-02 05:52:32 PM

namatad: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505145_162-57325132/25-college-majors-wit h -the-highest-unemployment-rates/

QUICK!
How can you tell that the IDIOT who made this top 25 list doesnt actually know how to count to 25?!!

They list more than 25 degrees and put the ties on the same line item.
SO top 29 degrees ....

http://graphicsweb.wsj.com/documents/NILF1111/#term= 
173 degrees
income ranges, popularity and unemployment 
YAY DATA


so pick something with high pay, low unemployment and probably get a job with your degree
or pick something with high unemployment or low pay and then complain about having to live at home still
 
2013-03-02 05:58:32 PM

Pincy: EvilEgg: unlikely: Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?

Unless you were recruited straight out of college, yep.

Yay for me graduating during Clinton boom.

Here here!  And with a computer science degree to boot.

I think I'd probably kill myself if I was graduating today.


Nah.  If you don't mind working 80 hour weeks, you can walk out with 90K + 90K signing bonus in the Pacific NW.

/Or 70K in the Bay Area plus some stock in exchange for 60 hour weeks.
//Or 60K near Detroit (at 1/3rd the COL of the Bay Area) for 50.
///Or 50K in Chicago.
 
2013-03-02 05:58:44 PM
In areas where rent prices have increased substantially, this is not surprising. Same for areas with higher unemployment, or a higher number of people with student loans
 
2013-03-02 06:20:03 PM
As someone looking at moving back home in order to take a job, I'm getting a kick...

/insert usual rant about greedy farkweasels
 
2013-03-02 06:22:44 PM

Mugato: Pincy: Here here! And with a computer science degree to boot.

What does a CS degree even mean nowadays? I didn't even need one to get a programmer job back in '99. Now you have to have 10 years experience in 5 different languages to get an entry level gig.

/recovering software developer, video editor/VFX guy


Depending on your school (and chosen classes), a CS degree can mean several things:

1) Pure theory.  Stuff with algorithms, and Turing machines, and P=NP.  Hopefully, the school has a Software Engineering degree, because the CS kids suck at development.
2) The optimal course.  Pure applications.  They spend 4 years practicing the art of software engineering.  Hint: These kids will NEVER, EVER have a class containing [language name] on their transcript.  You don't take C++ classes, you take "Operating Systems", and learn C++ in the process.
3) Java schools.  They teach stupid stuff like "Java 101, 4 credits", and totally skip over the software engineering and theory portions.

#2's will often be quite good software developers, #1 and #3 not so much.  Hire #2's.

/And plugging my alma mater, the University of Michigan is a very good #2.  We ship about 30 kids to MSFT and 20 kids to Google every year.
//C, C++, Verilog, a fake turing-complete assembly language created specifically for that class, Python, PHP, Javascript, Java, a tiny bit of x86 assembly.  Currently a Python/Ruby/tiny bits of bash dev.
 
2013-03-02 06:24:00 PM

Clash City Farker: Slavery. Keep voting republican, idiots.



You really think this is about Republicans or Democrats when both parties are equally guilty for causing this mess we're all in?
 
2013-03-02 08:29:13 PM
Going on two years out of school with no work. Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em. Now I'm stuck living at home, retail doesn't want me because I'm overqualified, real jobs won't take me because I don't have any relevant experience (which I'm supposed to get how, exactly, when I'm straight out of school and no one is hiring?).

Finally got a lead on one place through a family contact, company that moved here from Cali for tax evasion reasons. Hoping that pans out. Otherwise, fark, I guess I have to hope my writing finally takes off, because I don't know what the fark I'm going to do, and the folks are getting impatient (can't blame them). Just glad I went to a cheap school so I'm not buried under huge loans, or I'd never see the light of day.
 
2013-03-02 09:04:28 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.


and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???
 
2013-03-02 09:04:48 PM

goatleggedfellow: The kids you raise are the ones that take care of you in your fragile and defenseless old age. They are the ones at your bedside adjusting your pillow. How you treat them determines which side of your head they put the pillow on.


I am so stealing that.
 
2013-03-02 09:06:48 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Going on two years out of school with no work. Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em. Now I'm stuck living at home, retail doesn't want me because I'm overqualified, real jobs won't take me because I don't have any relevant experience (which I'm supposed to get how, exactly, when I'm straight out of school and no one is hiring?).

Finally got a lead on one place through a family contact, company that moved here from Cali for tax evasion reasons. Hoping that pans out. Otherwise, fark, I guess I have to hope my writing finally takes off, because I don't know what the fark I'm going to do, and the folks are getting impatient (can't blame them). Just glad I went to a cheap school so I'm not buried under huge loans, or I'd never see the light of day.


Major in whip-buggery?  Some times it takes two runs through with an unfortunate pause between (my own case), at least I can confirm this:  Man you will rock those classes going in as a determined adult instead of a temperate I don't know what I really want to do teen-young adult.
 
2013-03-02 09:09:46 PM

BumpInTheNight: Major in whip-buggery? Some times it takes two runs through with an unfortunate pause between (my own case), at least I can confirm this: Man you will rock those classes going in as a determined adult instead of a temperate I don't know what I really want to do teen-young adult.


As an instructor, I can confirm that I like to see a few token respectable adults in the class, because it means someone will actually be paying attention.
 
2013-03-02 09:10:49 PM
These numbers are awfully slanted.

College graduates 18-24?  Seriously?

Without failing/skipping a grade, students are 17 or 18 (depending on their birthday) when they start Senior Year of high school.
The median time to finish a bachelors degree is up to 52 months (http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=569)

A 'normal' student is going to finish college at age 22.5-23.
 
2013-03-02 09:22:35 PM

namatad: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.

and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???


I'm in his same boat. My degree is in electron microscopy. Its a bio major with a chemistry minor tacked on, plus 4 semesters of graduate level microscopy courses. 5 years ago they were shipping guys out with jobs as good as their professors. Or so they kept telling us. Right now I'm crossing my fingers on a lab-tek job for 14 an hour and praying I can tread water in that long enough to go back to school or find a real job.
 
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