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(The Atlantic)   45% of recent college graduates still live with their parents. The other 55% were unavailable due to no phone in their parents' basement   (theatlantic.com) divider line 80
    More: Fail, college graduate, basements, The Atlantic, graduates, parents  
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1317 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Mar 2013 at 2:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-02 09:52:25 PM

StarlingFive: namatad: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.

and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???

I'm in his same boat. My degree is in electron microscopy. Its a bio major with a chemistry minor tacked on, plus 4 semesters of graduate level microscopy courses. 5 years ago they were shipping guys out with jobs as good as their professors. Or so they kept telling us. Right now I'm crossing my fingers on a lab-tek job for 14 an hour and praying I can tread water in that long enough to go back to school or find a real job.


Yup PhD in Biochemistry. There's not a god damn thing out there. I can think of many causes for this, but I'm gonna keep it short and blame the leaders of the free world.
 
2013-03-02 10:03:57 PM

pellies: StarlingFive: namatad: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.

and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???

I'm in his same boat. My degree is in electron microscopy. Its a bio major with a chemistry minor tacked on, plus 4 semesters of graduate level microscopy courses. 5 years ago they were shipping guys out with jobs as good as their professors. Or so they kept telling us. Right now I'm crossing my fingers on a lab-tek job for 14 an hour and praying I can tread water in that long enough to go back to school or find a real job.

Yup PhD in Biochemistry. There's not a god damn thing out there. I can think of many causes for this, but I'm gonna keep it short and blame the leaders of the free world.


If you've done some programming, try to switch.  We're not quite at Dot-Com boom days, but the whole "outsource everything to India" craze is over (since they tend to produce massive, unmaintainable balls of code), and if you're good, you'll get plenty of offers.

/Or to put it another way, even given COL differences and taxes, I'm making more at 20 than my father is at 55.
//Ignoring COL differences and taxes, I'm making 2.5x what he is, because WTF, San Francisco.
 
2013-03-02 10:33:33 PM
Dang, I wish I had a basement.

/stupid California-housing-boom-mini-mansions-pieces-of-crap
 
2013-03-02 10:37:15 PM

meyerkev: pellies: StarlingFive: namatad: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.

and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???

I'm in his same boat. My degree is in electron microscopy. Its a bio major with a chemistry minor tacked on, plus 4 semesters of graduate level microscopy courses. 5 years ago they were shipping guys out with jobs as good as their professors. Or so they kept telling us. Right now I'm crossing my fingers on a lab-tek job for 14 an hour and praying I can tread water in that long enough to go back to school or find a real job.

Yup PhD in Biochemistry. There's not a god damn thing out there. I can think of many causes for this, but I'm gonna keep it short and blame the leaders of the free world.

If you've done some programming, try to switch.  We're not quite at Dot-Com boom days, but the whole "outsource everything to India" craze is over (since they tend to produce massive, unmaintainable balls of code), and if you're good, you'll get plenty of offers.

/Or to put it another way, even given COL differences and taxes, I'm making more at 20 than my father is at 55.
//Ignoring COL differences and taxes, I'm making 2.5x what he is, because WTF, San Francisco.


Ya I'm stuck at Watfiv and then FORTRAN.
 
2013-03-02 10:43:02 PM
I remember when I graduated high school, I was called an idiot by the other kids in my IB classes because I took a year off after HS to work for a race team before I went to college. I got an athletic scholarship so luckily I never had to worry about student loans etc., but I wanted to get experience working an honest job.

Fast forward just over a decade, and that job with the race team has paid more dividends than my 4 years of school. I have still never used my degree (and no, it's not a liberal arts degree or some crap like that) and I couldn't be happier.

I count myself as one of the lucky ones.
 
2013-03-02 11:34:52 PM
As a recent college graduate who lives with his parents, I would like to comment on this topic.

1.  It has always been common.  Then it became "uncool"
2.  My room was empty, and through high school and college I pretty much neglected my parents.  We all appreciate the two years that I will have lived with them.  In particular since I am moving across the country after this year for graduate school.  I find it amusing that everyone hates living with their parents then they complain that they did not spend enough time with their parents.
3.  We all recognize the massive financial gain I have by living with them for these two years.
-My car is paid off essentially (Money is in a bank account with automatic withdrawal because fark yeah 0%).
-I have been able to start a retirement fund (and have money set aside to continue funding them for the next 5 years while I am at grad school).
-I have other savings that will likely mostly get eaten up with moving and buying a few new things I will need.
4.  The cost to my parents through all of this is food essentially (they would be paying the same on the house either way same thing with a lot of insurance, plus tax benefits)
5.  I do a lot of the cooking and most of the outdoor housework (shoveling, mowing the lawn, raking), and general house maintenance (house is safely in that aging faze where everything begins to break).  In part because I enjoy a lot of it, in part because they are good skills to have (home maintenance), and I see no reason to to pay someone a lot of money to fix something I should be more than capable of fixing myself.  So it is actually a net gain for my parents because I moved back.

Through it all what really surprises me is how FEW people do it.  It is a beneficial to all parties involved.

I don't know when crippling debt and financial insecurity suddenly became cooler and more mature than going back an living with your parents for a year or two, but it is something that should probably be reversed.  Having lived with my parents for the last two years I would not trade it for anything.  I have always been moving forward in a direction that would get me out of the house and I think that is important, there was always a time frame for me to move out.  People that are still living with their parents for decades after graduating (with the exception of some instances often medical related on the part of either parent or child) that would be a problem
 
2013-03-03 12:01:46 AM

meyerkev: pellies: StarlingFive: namatad: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.

and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???

I'm in his same boat. My degree is in electron microscopy. Its a bio major with a chemistry minor tacked on, plus 4 semesters of graduate level microscopy courses. 5 years ago they were shipping guys out with jobs as good as their professors. Or so they kept telling us. Right now I'm crossing my fingers on a lab-tek job for 14 an hour and praying I can tread water in that long enough to go back to school or find a real job.

Yup PhD in Biochemistry. There's not a god damn thing out there. I can think of many causes for this, but I'm gonna keep it short and blame the leaders of the free world.

If you've done some programming, try to switch.  We're not quite at Dot-Com boom days, but the whole "outsource everything to India" craze is over (since they tend to produce massive, unmaintainable balls of code), and if you're good, you'll get plenty of offers.


Got any specific suggestions for websites or self learner books? Or what would be the best starting language? I'm a self learner with way to much time on my hands, and programming would look really good in the field I want to get into anyway.
 
2013-03-03 12:35:11 AM
randomjsa:

On the other hand I'm just wondering... When did it become taboo precisely to live with your parents? It used to be extremely common but now suddenly... it's a bad thing. If you are paying your bills and living your life, what difference does it make?

Been wondering this too. It wasn't long ago that kids lived with their parents until they got married, and even then depending on circumstances some people still lived with their parents. In a few other cultures it's still very common and the idea is that the parents help the kids get a good start and then some time later when the parents need looking after the kids do their part.

Now our culture demands that children move out ASAP even if it will cost them half their paycheck, so we have a generation of young adults who might work for a decade or more and have little to show for it as they're paying a landlord rather than saving for a house or retirement. And then at the same time the elderly are increasingly cared for in retirement homes by professional caregivers and often have to sell their house to afford to pay rent and for the care that used to come from their children, and by the time they die all the wealth they managed to save for their entire lives is gone and they have nothing to leave their kids.

We're at a point where social expectations have led to enormous drains on the wealth of the working and middle class, squeezing wealth from people at both ends of their adult life.

How would the state of the nation's finances look if the norm was for children to live with parents for the first 5 years of their working life? If instead of paying a landlord $1000/month (YMMV) 20-somethings were able to put half to retirement and half to savings. At the end of the 5 years that's $30,000 sitting in the bank and $30,000 in a 401k/IRA before they're 30, enough for a decent downpayment on a house in most of the country and a seriously boosted retirement plan. It's one of the few ways middle/working class parents can give their kids a major financial leg-up, and now it's taboo.

Instead they live paycheck to paycheck for year after year.
 
2013-03-03 12:55:07 AM
I lived at home for a little over 3 years after graduating from college.  Parents said this is your home and always will be.  I was able to help them out (health problems for both, especially Dad) and in the meantime save up more than enough for a down payment on a house and things to put in said house.  After 3 years I was more than ready for my own place, but I'll be forever grateful to them.
 
2013-03-03 02:24:13 AM
Millenials get shat on all the time, but they really are getting a raw deal.  They are graduating during the worst economic period that has occurred in any of our lifetimes at a time when a college education is more expensive than ever in real terms.  Many, who would have gone on to lead productive middle upper-middle class lives had they graduated in the 90s will instead be shuffled into whatever retail work they can get all while being crushed under the weight of non-discargable student loan debt.

On the other hand, they still have more luxuries than 99.99% of humans throughout history.  J.P. Morgan didn't have central air conditioning or an Ipad, but the guy making your coffee at Starbucks probably does.
 
2013-03-03 02:42:28 AM
I never understood this obsession with the first world with having the youngsters live on their own and ridicule anyone who doesn't.

In my culture, people usually don't move out of their parents houses unless they get married.

Oh wait, I actually do understand it. If a family has 2-3 kids and they keep living with their parents until let's say 30 each, that family only has to buy 1 fridge, 1 washer, 1 range, 1 microwave, etc. If all of the kids suddenly moved out, they'd probably had to buy 4 fridges, 4 washers, 4 ranges, 4 microwaves, etc not to mention having to buy/rent houses, thus making the big corps more money. Do you think it's a coincidence every movie and sitcom out there makes fun of people living with their parents? Ask yourself why is that considered ridiculous? There's not actual reason just because. The media is to the service of capitalism and they use it to advance agendas of their own. So by having media ridicule people living with their parents, they're nudging social behaviour towards that goal because it represents more money for them.
 
2013-03-03 02:43:49 AM

StarlingFive: meyerkev: pellies: StarlingFive: namatad: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Was pretty much straight-up lied to by college advisors about how in-demand my program was when I was a freshman, didn't know any better than to trust 'em.

and um you are too embarrassed to admit what that major/program was?
seriously, basket weaving and buggy-whip making is not in demand???

I'm in his same boat. My degree is in electron microscopy. Its a bio major with a chemistry minor tacked on, plus 4 semesters of graduate level microscopy courses. 5 years ago they were shipping guys out with jobs as good as their professors. Or so they kept telling us. Right now I'm crossing my fingers on a lab-tek job for 14 an hour and praying I can tread water in that long enough to go back to school or find a real job.

Yup PhD in Biochemistry. There's not a god damn thing out there. I can think of many causes for this, but I'm gonna keep it short and blame the leaders of the free world.

If you've done some programming, try to switch.  We're not quite at Dot-Com boom days, but the whole "outsource everything to India" craze is over (since they tend to produce massive, unmaintainable balls of code), and if you're good, you'll get plenty of offers.

Got any specific suggestions for websites or self learner books? Or what would be the best starting language? I'm a self learner with way to much time on my hands, and programming would look really good in the field I want to get into anyway.


So the short answer is: I have no clue as far as websites or starter books go.  If you ever want to do C, pick up Kernigan and Ritchie, if you ever want to do C++, pick up the latest Stroustrup (coming out this May), and at some point grab Gang Of Four.  I picked this stuff up at school, and even took a software engineering course just to make me better at this design stuff.  A lot of this stuff just kind of comes with experience.  Do something, have questions, go to Google to answer them.  If you find yourself returning to one particular set of tools (langauge or otherwise), go grab a book on that tool, because you've no doubt reinvented the wheel a bunch of times since you didn't know the wheel existed, and books are really good at filling in holes in your knowledge.

As far as "How to Program" instead of "How to write code in [language]":
Some of the  http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?cat=66  Twenty Sided Tale stuff is really good, especially the bits where he basically narrates how he coded things.   http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?page_id=16458
http://www.joelonsoftware.com/ - He's stopped writing, and some of this stuff is somewhat dated, but the rest is really, really good.
http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/
http://thedailywtf.com/ - What not to do.  No seriously, if you don't understand WHY these things are WTF's, think about it, and then go into the comments.

As far as languages go, I actually have 4 separate answers that you can sort of merge to your circumstances

1) It depends on what you want to do.  You want to write games, go C/C++.  You're doing websites, take a look at the whole HTML, JS, server-side stack.  Enterprise is usually some combo of Java and/or .NET (though .NET will lock you into MSFT, which is a bad thing for writing code.  Outside of my 2  game design classes, I never ever wrote code on Windows.  I always used Linux.)  Figure out what people in your industry are using and use that.

2) "What language should I be learning?" is really the absolute wrong question to be asking.  What you really need to know is things like Big-O, data structures (and Big-O thereof), inheritance concepts, and design patterns (and source control.  Knowing how to use git/mercurial and github is nearly as important as knowing how to write the code in the first place).  A good programmer can take pretty much any modern language and be 90% up to speed in a matter of days or weeks, because it's just applying same concepts, different syntax.

3) Whatever languages you use, there are a few things that you should probably understand.

#1: Pointers (Figure out how to reverse a C++ linked list before doing any interviews.  That was a question in about 50% of my coding interviews.).  C++ is probably the canonical language for doing so.

Basically, pointers are a way of saying: I store the location of an X.

So I can say:

int n;
int * n_ptr;

n= 4; //Let's pretend that n_ptr is at memory 100
n_ptr = &n; //Set n_ptr to point at n.  n = 4, n_ptr = 100.  Literally n_ptr = reference to n
*n_ptr = 2; //set the value that is pointed to by n_ptr to 2.  n= 2, n_ptr = 100.
int * n_ptr2 = n_ptr// point n_ptr2 at the same thing that n_ptr is pointing to
int n2 = *n_ptr; //Set n2 equal to the value that is pointed at by n_ptr.

Now then, let's have some fun:

int n1 = 1, n2 = 2;
int * p1 = &n1;
int * p2 = &n2;

n1 = *p2
p1 = p2
*p2 = 3
*p1  = n1
*p1 = *p2 + n2
p2 = &n1
*p2 = n1 + *p1

What are n1 and n2, and what variables are p1 and p2 pointing to?  (And I could have made this way worse, by adding int **, which are int pointer pointers.)

#2: First-class functions which let you pass functions as objects (which you can't do in C. (Okay, you can, but you won't want to because function pointers suck)) See  http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/08/01.html for why this is so cool.

#3:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_system (use the links in the box on the top right) - namely, Dynamic vs. Static, Strong vs. Weak and duct typing.  If at all possible, spend least a little bit of time in languages with all of those features to figure out why they all suck in different ways.

4) (And a longer version of this is the 2nd linked wall of text below) If you forced me to pick one, start with C.  Because it's dead-dog simple.  Pointers will screw you (and string manipulation is at its best an ice-cold biatch), but there are no classes, very few API's, just you, some basic data types, simple logic, structs, and functions (and manual memory allocation/deallocation, which while annoying is good to know).  For learning basic concepts, it's probably the best language in existence because it's uncluttered.  You can learn if/else-if/else, for, while, case, etc. without being distracted.

Then in a month, toss out the C compiiler, and bring in the C++ compiler (and all your old code will still work because C++ is backwards-compatible).  Go learn C++ with templates and classes and inheritance and the STL and all that jazz.  Pick up Stroustrup's new book in May for C++11.  Learn OOP and software design in the process.  See my software design course at the University of Michigan for some good resources:  http://www.umich.edu/~eecs381/.

Once you really, really know C++, you're about 90% of the way to learning Java and C# (because they're basically C++ with nicer syntax and no pointers).  Take a day or two and figure out what they removed and what they added (Namely the whole interface vs. class thing).  Congrats, you're now quite good at Java and C#.  (And sadly, it doesn't work the other way.  C++ -> Java is fun.  Java -> C++ is hard.)

And then you can take your C++-oriented brain over into the scripty side (Python, Ruby, JavaScript, etc), figure out what lambdas are, get used to the ability to pass around functions as objects, and then you're good.  Most of the new stuff with the scripty languages (other than dynamic typing) is not new concepts, it's just things that make writing code easier (and lets you do Map-reduce: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/08/01.html).

Now if you just want to write some small scripts, and not be a software developer, ignore that whole thing and head over and learn basic Python or Ruby (General rule, basic == "Things that are in C, minus pointers (which don't exist at a level that you care about anyways), plus basic classes and Exceptions".  You don't need to know decorators or generators or things like that at first).  The dynamic typing is a bit weird at first, but they're fairly easy, flexible languages to learn.

Honestly, other than some Java in high school and bypassing C straight for C++, this is the path I took.  (Simple C++ -> more advanced C++ -> really advanced C++ as part of software design (and 2 weeks of pure C here) -> Hey, Java is gimped C++, but the garbage collector means I don't have to delete things -> hey, scripting languages are really easy to write, and don't need a compiler.)

So I've written 2 separate walls of text in other threads about what you should be learning along with a small booklist in the second one.

http://www.fark.com/comments/7618752/82791338#c82791338
http://www.fark.com/comments/7476988/81185221#c81185221 - And this is basically a longer version of #4.

Things I'd add to my lists:

1) Don't learn languages, learn to do things.  Don't just wake up and say "I'm going to learn HTML today", wake up and say "I'm going to write and deploy a website today". Because in the process, you'll learn Unix, [your chosen backend web server of choice], [your chosen backend language of choice that isn't PHP because PHP sucks (and follow through to PHP: A Fractal of Bad Design)], HTML, Javascript, and some bash scripting to get the stupid thing deployed (and now you have something to show off to potential employers).

Knowledge of a language without experience using it is worse than no knowledge of the language at all. Most of the really, really important stuff (Big-O, data structures, algorithms) is fairly language-agnostic anyways.

2) I've said it before, but it's worth saying again.  The most important thing you'll learn is not how to write code, but how to engineer code.  The highest goal of code is to be easily maintainable and understandable.
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=4166 - Software Engineering,  http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=12271 - Learning to Program vs. Learning to Write Software

3) Whenever you pick up a new language, google for some quick guides to canonical code style for that language (Capitalization is the big gotcha.  PascalCase vs camelCase vs under_scores.  What gets named what is always interesting).  Figure out how other people are going to expect you to write your code.  When I started doing Ruby, I spent 2 weeks doing a back and forth code review because I writing perfectly functional "C++ code in Ruby" and not "Ruby code".  I learned more in those 2 weeks than I did in the previous 3 years at school.

For a fairly good overview of some of the various back and forths from a self-taught C/C++ perspective:http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=18368 - Coding style part 1 of 4, where a guy analyzes the id software style guide.  (And read the comments.  Always interesting to hear what people think)
 
2013-03-03 02:47:50 AM
Wow, that ended up being a lot longer than I thought it was going to be.  Especially since I linked you to two other walls of text.
 
2013-03-03 09:17:17 AM
I graduated in 2010 and got hired into the consulting shop I interned at for 2 years, been there almost 5 total now. Haven't moved back with parents since the day I moved to the college dorms, including some crappy 3-month sublets during school summers. Feeling thankful this morning, and whenever I read this sort of thing. Lots of my friends aren't so fortunate, even a few years out now.
 
2013-03-03 09:21:33 AM

meyerkev: Wow, that ended up being a lot longer than I thought it was going to be.  Especially since I linked you to two other walls of text.


Thank you, my son is interested in writing code. That was very kind and helpful of you.
 
2013-03-03 09:28:29 AM

quickdraw: Thank you, my son is interested in writing code. That was very kind and helpful of you.


The only one I'd have probably tried to tack on there is "Learn what threading is and understand the fundamental advantages and gotchas involved with using them".  The current landscape of hardware is trending towards more cores rather then just straight up faster ones so when you're looking to make a program do a lot of work very quickly they are invaluable if you can leverage them when there is opportunity.  Even some situations where performance isn't your goal but rather elegant solutions where you can just have a thread sitting there blocked waiting for something to do vs having some loop endlessly polling, things like that.  Its a more advanced concept but if you want to be taken seriously as a programmer its a concept you must at least understand even if you rarely use it.
 
2013-03-03 03:07:51 PM

meyerkev: Wow, that ended up being a lot longer than I thought it was going to be.  Especially since I linked you to two other walls of text.


Wall of text is probably a good thing. I was reading around on the subject after I left the thread. Your summary seems just as or more useful than most everything else, and a hundred times as compact.
 
2013-03-03 06:06:44 PM

meyerkev: Wow, that ended up being a lot longer than I thought it was going to be.  Especially since I linked you to two other walls of text.


Well, given that if programming well were easy for the average person there'd be no money in it, the more text the better.  One thing I'm wondering is--how old is too old to get back into coding (and make some money somewhere) after a long time away from it?
 
2013-03-03 11:30:37 PM
The other 55% didn't get theater or English degrees so they were able to find jobs.
 
2013-03-03 11:38:08 PM
Well we know your degree wasn't in economics or finance.
 
2013-03-03 11:51:39 PM
Always a good laugh when people lie about not being able to get a retail job because they are over qualified. If that was true then don't put your degree on your application. If you are too dumb to figure that out then you didn't get a real degree anyway.
 
2013-03-04 09:29:57 AM

Bullseyed: Always a good laugh when people lie about not being able to get a retail job because they are over qualified. If that was true then don't put your degree on your application. If you are too dumb to figure that out then you didn't get a real degree anyway.


Then what am I supposed to put in the whole where the degree would be?  What do I say I've actually been doing for the years it took to attain it?  I've been given this bullshiat advice before, and nobody's ever been able to answer that question.
 
2013-03-04 10:55:27 AM

unlikely: Is this news? After College most of the people I knew moved back home while they looked for jobs. Were they just anomalies?


Most people I know who graduated just stayed wherever they lived when they graduated while looking for a job since student housing is relatively cheap. I lived on campus and the rule there was that you could stay 6 months + number of years you lived on campus in months after graduation. So if you lived on campus for 6 years then you could stay up to a year after graduation.

Used to be this rule wasn't in the contract and there were guys in their 50's still living in student housing on campus, took several court cases to get them out.
 
2013-03-04 11:28:29 AM
My campus the rule was "You're done? You have 2 weeks. Go."
 
2013-03-04 12:01:00 PM

Bondith: Bullseyed: Always a good laugh when people lie about not being able to get a retail job because they are over qualified. If that was true then don't put your degree on your application. If you are too dumb to figure that out then you didn't get a real degree anyway.

Then what am I supposed to put in the whole where the degree would be?  What do I say I've actually been doing for the years it took to attain it?  I've been given this bullshiat advice before, and nobody's ever been able to answer that question.


The trouble with lying is unless you know how to do it you can't just get away with a single one.  You need to be able to think on your feet and spin the yarn further if a lie is pressed...and it sounds like you can't do that so I agree:  You shouldn't try that.  Leave it to the fast-thinkers, because if you need someone else to make up bullshiat to explain a 3-4 year gap in your timeline where you were supposedly learning to think for yourself... ;)
 
2013-03-04 12:03:18 PM
^^ Meanwhile, I also bet that the fast-thinkers aren't often in positions where they have a degree yet applying to retail positions which have been rejecting them for "being overqualified".
 
2013-03-04 01:43:41 PM

BumpInTheNight: The trouble with lying is unless you know how to do it you can't just get away with a single one. You need to be able to think on your feet and spin the yarn further if a lie is pressed...and it sounds like you can't do that so I agree: You shouldn't try that. Leave it to the fast-thinkers, because if you need someone else to make up bullshiat to explain a 3-4 year gap in your timeline where you were supposedly learning to think for yourself... ;)


So basically, you don't have advice, you just want to make fun of a stranger on the Internet so you can feel superior to those over-educated idiots.

Go fark yourself, mouthbreather.
 
2013-03-04 02:45:54 PM

Bondith: So basically, you don't have advice, you just want to make fun of a stranger on the Internet so you can feel superior to those over-educated idiots.

Go fark yourself, mouthbreather.


Says the guy who can't even figure out how to smooth over a gap in their resume.
 
2013-03-04 03:09:17 PM

BumpInTheNight: Bondith: So basically, you don't have advice, you just want to make fun of a stranger on the Internet so you can feel superior to those over-educated idiots.

Go fark yourself, mouthbreather.

Says the guy who can't even figure out how to smooth over a gap in their resume.


I'm a scientist.  Data massage and outright lying are frowned upon in my profession.

Welcome to the twitlist.
 
2013-03-04 03:25:15 PM

Bondith: I'm a scientist. Data massage and outright lying are frowned upon in my profession.

Welcome to the twitlist.


Let's back up a sec here:  You are the one that came in berating a tactic for overcoming a hurdle involving employers being wary of hiring someone who's overqualified.  You're the one that asked how the tactic of omitting your post-secondary education on a resume would play out and you are the one that said you didn't understand how it could be accomplished.

So you could said that option isn't available to you due to your profession but no, you said you didn't understand it.  Good jorb.
 
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