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(Wimp)   It's a great big universe and we're all really puny, we're just tiny little specks about the size of Mickey Rooney   (wimp.com) divider line 17
    More: Interesting, Mickey Rooney, sizes  
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2277 clicks; posted to Video » on 02 Mar 2013 at 12:50 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-03-02 01:00:52 PM  
It's big and black and inky, and we're all small and dinky,
It's a big universe, and we're not.
 
2013-03-02 01:01:52 PM  
Dumb question.... if the universe is 13.8 billion years old, but 93 billion light years across... how did it expand to that size? If the speed of light is a maximum speed of matter, how did it expand to this size in such a short time?
 
2013-03-02 01:06:28 PM  
Very helpful, but one small problem. He says the longer we wait, the more stuff we'll be able to see. I thought with the accelerating expansion of the universe, things at the edge would fade away as they moved farther out, meaning the visible universe is getting smaller, not bigger.

Am I wrong?
 
2013-03-02 01:08:22 PM  
So my mommy was right, I am the CENTER OF THE UNIVERSE
 
2013-03-02 01:11:57 PM  

LesserEvil: Dumb question.... if the universe is 13.8 billion years old, but 93 billion light years across... how did it expand to that size? If the speed of light is a maximum speed of matter, how did it expand to this size in such a short time?


The speed of light is a limit on light, but not on the expansion of the universe. It sounds strange but think of it this way: Space is expanding. If something one LY is moving away at one speed, something 100 LY is moving away 100 times as fast. So something 13 billion LY away is moving away 13 billion times as fast. You can see where this is going. Depending on where you stand, that expansion of space could be faster than the speed of light.
 
2013-03-02 01:52:15 PM  

LDM90: Very helpful, but one small problem. He says the longer we wait, the more stuff we'll be able to see. I thought with the accelerating expansion of the universe, things at the edge would fade away as they moved farther out, meaning the visible universe is getting smaller, not bigger.

Am I wrong?


no.

LDM90: LesserEvil: Dumb question.... if the universe is 13.8 billion years old, but 93 billion light years across... how did it expand to that size? If the speed of light is a maximum speed of matter, how did it expand to this size in such a short time?

The speed of light is a limit on light, but not on the expansion of the universe. It sounds strange but think of it this way: Space is expanding. If something one LY is moving away at one speed, something 100 LY is moving away 100 times as fast. So something 13 billion LY away is moving away 13 billion times as fast. You can see where this is going. Depending on where you stand, that expansion of space could be faster than the speed of light.


It`s like being in water. Your speed limit in water swimming might be, say 3mph. The water itself might be moving at 6mph (a fast river) so without swimming you would move away from an observer twice as fast as your maximum speed without even swimming. Spacetime is the water that objects exist in so they can become distant faster than the speed of light whilst not moving at all...
 
2013-03-02 01:54:55 PM  
LesserEvil:  Think of it this way.  Suppose that we start at time 0 with one checker.  Every second, each checker in the line splits into two checkers, with the new on being placed to the right of the old now.  After one second there is two checkers, after 2 seconds we have four, after 8 seconds, there will be 64 checkers.  But if we can only count one checker every second, we will never get to the end of the line of checkers.
 
2013-03-02 02:09:39 PM  

Stridar: LesserEvil:  Think of it this way.  Suppose that we start at time 0 with one checker.  Every second, each checker in the line splits into two checkers, with the new on being placed to the right of the old now.  After one second there is two checkers, after 2 seconds we have four, after 8 seconds, there will be 64 checkers.  But if we can only count one checker every second, we will never get to the end of the line of checkers.


I understand that concept, but logically, there are issues. If space is 'expanding' in such a way, how does anything remain stable? At the universes smallest "checker", to stay together, particles would STILL have to travel at least as fast as the expansion to stay "together". If we say that the universe is expanding by some sort of cosmic osmosis of the intervening spaces, and that expansion happens faster than the speed of light, matter should not be stable at all, since its particles could not hold together (they cannot travel across the new space faster than the speed of light)
 
2013-03-02 02:20:22 PM  
LesserEvil:   The checkers in the example are 'areas' of space.  They have neither mass nor energy, and are only expanding.  'Particle's stay where they are.  Space changes around them.

But that is only a simple model to give an idea how expansion doesn't need to happen faster than the speed of light.  You're right there are other problems.  In reality things are always more complicated than any model we can devise.
 
2013-03-02 03:24:39 PM  
The expansion as a *whole* is faster than light-speed, but it's the sum of teeny-tiny expansions all the way between Point A and Point B.

If you picture the classic "draw a grid on a balloon and inflate it" metaphor, note that the grid lines don't (being ideal grid lines on an ideal balloon) stretch even while getting farther apart.
 
2013-03-02 03:31:39 PM  
Came in here to make a comment, then I see all the nice explanations.

Now I feel silly.

All I wanted to say was.  Nicely done.
 
2013-03-02 05:24:09 PM  
Helloooooooo, Nurse!
 
2013-03-02 06:50:43 PM  
I always thought the center of the universe was this Nissan dealership in Lawton, Oklahoma...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jsm6uiJUqbg
 
2013-03-02 07:38:09 PM  
The universe is expanding at a smaller rate than the speed of light.  So the video would be correct, we are able to see more of the observable universe at each next moment.
 
2013-03-02 09:52:37 PM  
You may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's....
 
2013-03-02 11:22:40 PM  

LDM90: Very helpful, but one small problem. He says the longer we wait, the more stuff we'll be able to see. I thought with the accelerating expansion of the universe, things at the edge would fade away as they moved farther out, meaning the visible universe is getting smaller, not bigger.

Am I wrong?


The visible universe is embiggening but also sparsifying.
 
2013-03-03 04:28:21 PM  
The visible universe is embiggening but also sparsifying.

But is it embiggening faster than it is sparsing?
 
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