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(Southern CA Public Radio)   Turns out it's illegal for school districts to ask parents to buy school supplies   (scpr.org) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, school districts  
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10895 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Mar 2013 at 3:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-02 04:27:17 AM
5 votes:

ReverendJasen: The page-long list of demanded supplies our kids bring home each year is starting to get ridiculous.  Some of the teachers even specify what brand of item they'll accept.  The one made sure to bold and italicize that the our 1st grader's scissors be "Fiskars" and only "Fiskars."  I think she owned Fiskar stock, personally.


<--- Dated a teacher for many moons.  Usually specifics like that are there for 2 reasons:

1.     There's always that one kid that'll show up with some arcane left-handed scissors drop-forged in the fires of Ulm usable only by retarded bushwhacking cobblies from the planet Illse if you don't specify.   And it always turns out that little Susie is NOT a left-handed bushwhacking cobblie, knows no magic, and is allergic to drop forging.  When you bother to ask parents why they provided some strange scissors that little Susie effectively can't use for shiat, you learn not to ask the next 22 kids that do that over the years, as there will not be any sort of intelligent answer.  Trust me on this.

2.     Everyone having the same thing cuts down on severely or nearly eliminates the problems you get with jealousy and petty theft of supplies due to it.  "Susie has glitter-handled vibtrating scissors that summon Jesus, why do I have these plain old Fiskars whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa."  (Class is now distrupted multiple times over the year dealing with bullshiat over people wanting other peoples' supplies, and in some cases flat out ganking them and/or just ruining them in some horrible or horrifying way (or both!)  Not to mention having to convince Jesus that the kids need to get busy on their math so can we cut the visits short here, scissors summon or no?

Not getting into the who should provide what debate, too many variables between schools, methods, resources, etc. to really have that intelligent of a commentary on the idea in general.  BUT those 2 reasons are your primaries for any teacher with a very specific (and usually not so coincidentally non-flashy, fairly low quality, but servicable items) list

/Yep kids are absolute bastards like that, and much worse.  They can be amazing and amazingly hateful in the same 5 minutes - they're cool like that.
//Parents are even worse a lot of the time.  They're usually the enablers and sometimes the instigators of bringing in heavily flashy/decorated expensive school shiat for their kid where it's not specified what to get, cause the status game starts in pre-school for a lot of what I only call parents due to lack of any short descriptive word for people that have a family but have no idea how to actually PARENT.
2013-03-02 03:56:23 AM
4 votes:
anyone that knows a school teacher or two knows many teachers have been spending their own money buying and bringing in whatever they can for their students for years. meanwhile the bulk of most folks local taxes go to the school system. fark parents. you want to have children you should be paying for their needs.
2013-03-02 06:02:56 AM
3 votes:

Lernaeus: Damn straight.

You shouldn't have to PAY for your kid's education. Go on and shift that burden onto all taxpayers - including those whose kids are out if schools and those didn't breed - then excuse doing so with the ol' "educated kids" and "the good of society" argument, even though the kids will 'graduate' functionally illiterate and lacking rudimentary job and life skills.


Go home Ayn, you're dead for chrissake.
2013-03-02 08:26:18 AM
2 votes:
People who think they don't benefit personally from being taxed to pay for other people's education are apparently wishing they were surrounded by even more ignorant fools.
2013-03-02 08:25:37 AM
2 votes:

great_tigers: Conflicted,

On one hand I think that we need to stop enabling everyone in the USA. Are the schools supposed to supply the students with back packs and band instruments too?

Yet, I think that a small portion of a teachers salary is given with the expectation of spending some of it on school supplies for kids. Most employed people do sacrifice some of their wages to go to the opportunity to work. Manufacturing requires steel toed boots a lot of the time, dress shirts are required at more office centered jobs and need to be dry cleaned.

If a teacher needs to spend 100 dollars on some school supplies, I think their salary for working 9 months, impeccable insurance  and tenure will come with some of the territory.


My mother is now taking home less money than she did in the 70s, has no tenure because the state has nuked it for everyone, and sees half of her paycheck go to that "impeccable" insurance.  She takes home 800 dollars every two weeks right now for working her ass off from when she gets to school at 6am, then takes more work home with her and works until around 6pm.  And you want her to spend even more of her own money on basic supplies that should be provided?

Fark.  You.
2013-03-02 05:27:48 AM
2 votes:
Turns out, biatching about having to buy your kid basic school supplies makes you a shiatty parent.
2013-03-02 03:37:06 AM
2 votes:
CSB:  ca. 1954, school sent home a "supply list" (3d grade).  My mommy says "Kiss my ass" (not true, my mommy wouldn't say "shiat" if she had a mouthful).  Never heard another word about it.

/My mommy iss the original clas act, not because my mommy, because of what she is.
//She's 90, I'm 67.
///Unlike her, I've been known to say "shiat!" frequently.  Wish I had got the better parts of her.
2013-03-02 03:25:40 AM
2 votes:
So now schools have to provide their students with supplies. It is a good thing that education funding is not being cut due to a stupid compromise about the debt ceiling.
2013-03-02 04:32:47 PM
1 votes:
weasil:We just publish "Wish Lists" periodically throughout the year. My list always includes "gift cards from Target/Office Depot/Michael's crafts" so that I can get some of the cool stuff that the school doesn't think is necessary.


Until our daughter entered kindergarten this year in California, we'd never heard of schools providing the school supplies.  When we were growing up (in other states), our parents bought our notebooks, paper, pencils, crayons, etc., at the beginning of the school year.  So, we saved some out-of-pocket expense on that front...

However...

We're more than halfway into the school year and we've donated many hundreds of dollars in cash and miscellany to our daughter's school, including a $200 Staples gift card for our daughter's teacher.  Every week, there's another fundraiser, or an updated "wish list" posted on the bulletin board.  By the end of the year, we will have paid over $1,000 for our daughter to attend public school.
2013-03-02 03:22:53 PM
1 votes:

great_tigers: Teachers have to be the group of workers that complain the most about their profession.


Not many other professions come with a constant stream of media, community, and political idiots who haven't set foot in a classroom since they repeated 2nd grade trying to tell them how to do their jobs.
2013-03-02 10:22:55 AM
1 votes:
I teach in a district where the parents are overly litigious, and we've been through this a number of times. We just publish "Wish Lists" periodically throughout the year. My list always includes "gift cards from Target/Office Depot/Michael's crafts" so that I can get some of the cool stuff that the school doesn't think is necessary.

If there's anything that EVERY kid actually NEEDS, that comes from the school.

At this point in the year, my wish list is down to "kleenex, paper towels, kleenex, and some more kleenex" (note, I do not own stock in Kleenex) --- and even so, I always put in the caveat that if they don't want to send a whole box, at least send a pocket-pack with your own kids if they're going to have snot running out of their face.

/Fiskars produce a high-quality product that rarely ceases to function or even maintain structural integrity at some random point in the year.
//Our school board just kicked the budget back to the administration with the question, "Why are we cutting more than 150 teachers and staff when you just gave yourselves raises and you all have $3600/yr car allowances, yet you make more than twice the salary of anyone on the chopping block?"
2013-03-02 09:28:08 AM
1 votes:

MyRandomName: Fizpez: great_tigers: Deathfrogg: great_tigers: Conflicted,

On one hand I think that we need to stop enabling everyone in the USA. Are the schools supposed to supply the students with back packs and band instruments too?

Yet, I think that a small portion of a teachers salary is given with the expectation of spending some of it on school supplies for kids. Most employed people do sacrifice some of their wages to go to the opportunity to work. Manufacturing requires steel toed boots a lot of the time, dress shirts are required at more office centered jobs and need to be dry cleaned.

If a teacher needs to spend 100 dollars on some school supplies, I think their salary for working 9 months, impeccable insurance  and tenure will come with some of the territory.

Lol wut?

Pretty simple, parents need to take care of some things, teachers should also take care of some things. It isn't an all or nothing situation. It is a compromise.

Good thing teachers get to come to work naked on their magic flying unicorn and don't already have expenses tied to the job like maintaining a license, continuing education, supplies consumed at home that are 100% part of the job, etc.

And just to be clear - apparently its a crushing burden to ask the parents to buy the list of consumables the student will use up during the year, but it's perfectly OK to ask the teacher to buy that same list of material for all thirty+ students in their room, which apparently should cost "around a 100 dollars" for the whole class...... yeah, right.

Amazing how teachers think they are the only professions with continuing education.


Uh, no one thinks that - it was in response to the idiotic statement that teachers are paid a certain amount of money with the understanding that they should buy all the stuff their professional environment (the classroom) needs to function as well as supply their students with everything they could possibly need to make it through the year.

These threads always devolve into two camps. neither of which is supported by reality:

Camp A - Places all teachers as amazing people, with God like abilities.  They slave 23.89 hours per day 365 days per year for scraps of bread crust, which they promptly offer to their students in case they didnt get enough to eat.  When faced with a student without a pen they promptly open a vein so the student can use their own blood to write their homework.  They have never known a moment of peace and tranquility on the job as they are constantly saving drowning kittens while not actively turning every gang-banger into a Harvard law professor.  The administration actually stops by five to ten times a day to whip them with a scourge - fortunately they are able to teach right through this process while offering up their suffering to their students as a life lesson in humility while explaining the historic origins of the weapon being used to whip them.

Camp B - Thinks all teachers are morons who only because teachers because there weren't any jobs open at McDonald's, and they didn't want to have to work in the summer anyway.  They think teachers make roughly what a professional baseball player makes in the prime of his career and they spend about 15 minutes working each day and have a straight 254 days off in the summer time.  Because they had a bad teacher in 7th grade they're pretty sure all of these people are worth a combined value of 34 cents a year and should be paid accordingly.  This camp believes they would have 25.6 times more money in their paycheck if the money wasn't being funneled directly to the teacher's pension/hookers and blow fund.
2013-03-02 09:12:28 AM
1 votes:
wildlifer:
The stupid fundraisers are what pisses me off. Selling the same stuff dollar general sells at marked up prices. Or the stupid ballon sales, or candy sales. My kids don't need the stupid prizes if they sell 1000 units or whatever.

Wouldn't let my kids participate in school sales after my son had a box of his merchandise stolen and we had to pony up for it.  Ditto on the bake sales...brought in a home baked apple pie and found out that the lady organizing the sale took it home.

Anyway, when I went to junior high in the late '60s we had to buy our books and then sell them back at a reduced rate at the end of the semester, just like college.  We also had to buy a regulation gymsuit that was so ugly it looked like something from a Russian gulag.  They stopped all that nonsense by the time I got to high school.
2013-03-02 08:06:21 AM
1 votes:

ReverendJasen: Some of the teachers even specify what brand of item they'll accept.  The one made sure to bold and italicize that the our 1st grader's scissors be "Fiskars" and only "Fiskars."  I think she owned Fiskar stock, personally.


That's because if the teachers don't specifiy, the kids will bring in garden shears, haircutting scissors, or a Leatherman. Read any instruction your kid's teacher sends home as if it were written for a retarded person to understand and carry out. Don't take it personally.

great_tigers: It is a compromise.


A compromise is fully understood by both sides and as a result, can be planned for and negotiated.
2013-03-02 07:35:55 AM
1 votes:
Every parent expects to buy pencils, folders and other simple things like that. When you start asking them to buy textbooks and other things the school is supposed to be supplying things are getting out of hand.
2013-03-02 07:35:28 AM
1 votes:

Fizpez: Yet, I think that a small portion of a teachers salary is given with the expectation of spending some of it on school supplies for kids.


OH, BULLshiat!
2013-03-02 07:29:15 AM
1 votes:

great_tigers: Deathfrogg: great_tigers: Conflicted,

On one hand I think that we need to stop enabling everyone in the USA. Are the schools supposed to supply the students with back packs and band instruments too?

Yet, I think that a small portion of a teachers salary is given with the expectation of spending some of it on school supplies for kids. Most employed people do sacrifice some of their wages to go to the opportunity to work. Manufacturing requires steel toed boots a lot of the time, dress shirts are required at more office centered jobs and need to be dry cleaned.

If a teacher needs to spend 100 dollars on some school supplies, I think their salary for working 9 months, impeccable insurance  and tenure will come with some of the territory.

Lol wut?

Pretty simple, parents need to take care of some things, teachers should also take care of some things. It isn't an all or nothing situation. It is a compromise.


Good thing teachers get to come to work naked on their magic flying unicorn and don't already have expenses tied to the job like maintaining a license, continuing education, supplies consumed at home that are 100% part of the job, etc.

And just to be clear - apparently its a crushing burden to ask the parents to buy the list of consumables the student will use up during the year, but it's perfectly OK to ask the teacher to buy that same list of material for all thirty+ students in their room, which apparently should cost "around a 100 dollars" for the whole class...... yeah, right.
2013-03-02 06:52:04 AM
1 votes:

crabsno termites: CSB:  ca. 1954, school sent home a "supply list" (3d grade).  My mommy says "Kiss my ass" (not true, my mommy wouldn't say "shiat" if she had a mouthful).  Never heard another word about it.

/My mommy iss the original clas act, not because my mommy, because of what she is.
//She's 90, I'm 67.
///Unlike her, I've been known to say "shiat!" frequently.  Wish I had got the better parts of her.


So your cool story is that your mom is a class act, doesn't swear, is 90 and you wish you were like her more?

Usually, we try to tie into the article a little bit more.
2013-03-02 05:41:59 AM
1 votes:
Things like pencils, notebooks, folders... these things typically aren't reusable. A school could probably provide some basic art supplies like scissors and paintbrushes, but I can see those getting expensive with how many would vanish over time. So I can see the craft supplies possibly needing to be purchased by the parents. But the algebra book? A copy of To Kill a Mockingbird? The kid only needs these once in their entire lives over a 3 to 9 month period at most. If I lost a textbook in HS (and I did), or ruined the book in some manner, they charged me for it. We checked them out at the beginning of the trimester, then turned them back in at the end so the teacher could check them over for penis drawings.
2013-03-02 05:00:59 AM
1 votes:

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: ReverendJasen: The page-long list of demanded supplies our kids bring home each year is starting to get ridiculous.  Some of the teachers even specify what brand of item they'll accept.  The one made sure to bold and italicize that the our 1st grader's scissors be "Fiskars" and only "Fiskars."  I think she owned Fiskar stock, personally.

<--- Dated a teacher for many moons.  Usually specifics like that are there for 2 reasons:

1.     There's always that one kid that'll show up with some arcane left-handed scissors drop-forged in the fires of Ulm usable only by retarded bushwhacking cobblies from the planet Illse if you don't specify.   And it always turns out that little Susie is NOT a left-handed bushwhacking cobblie, knows no magic, and is allergic to drop forging.  When you bother to ask parents why they provided some strange scissors that little Susie effectively can't use for shiat, you learn not to ask the next 22 kids that do that over the years, as there will not be any sort of intelligent answer.  Trust me on this.

2.     Everyone having the same thing cuts down on severely or nearly eliminates the problems you get with jealousy and petty theft of supplies due to it.  "Susie has glitter-handled vibtrating scissors that summon Jesus, why do I have these plain old Fiskars whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa."  (Class is now distrupted multiple times over the year dealing with bullshiat over people wanting other peoples' supplies, and in some cases flat out ganking them and/or just ruining them in some horrible or horrifying way (or both!)  Not to mention having to convince Jesus that the kids need to get busy on their math so can we cut the visits short here, scissors summon or no?

Not getting into the who should provide what debate, too many variables between schools, methods, resources, etc. to really have that intelligent of a commentary on the idea in general.  BUT those 2 reasons are your primaries for any teacher with a very specific (and usually not so coincidentally non-flashy, fairly low quality, but servicable items) list

/Yep kids are absolute bastards like that, and much worse.  They can be amazing and amazingly hateful in the same 5 minutes - they're cool like that.
//Parents are even worse a lot of the time.  They're usually the enablers and sometimes the instigators of bringing in heavily flashy/decorated expensive school shiat for their kid where it's not specified what to get, cause the status game starts in pre-school for a lot of what I only call parents due to lack of any short descriptive word for people that have a family but have no idea how to actually PARENT.


Maybe that's the only type of scissors they had in the f--king house.

F--k basic supply lists. When I started school it was kleenex and crayons. When my 2 year younger brother finished it was 20 items long. We had the same teachers. Sad.
2013-03-02 04:59:28 AM
1 votes:
Students need to bring their own damn supplies. I can't tell you the disrespect they show to things they don't own. I give the kids 5 pencils to start off the year and then have bucket of pencils. I had 20 pencils in lending, absent and only two remain. Heard kids were throwing them the next day.
2013-03-02 04:57:39 AM
1 votes:

Karac: alfuso: School provided everything when I was a kid. All we brought to school was ourselves. Though I liked to have a pencil box and binder with paper of my own.

Schools didn't provide everything to me.  But they damn sure provided every kid in Algebra I with a copy of the textbook.


Same here.

/80s/90s kid
//yep we had a supply list
///yes it was sad
2013-03-02 04:01:25 AM
1 votes:
The page-long list of demanded supplies our kids bring home each year is starting to get ridiculous.  Some of the teachers even specify what brand of item they'll accept.  The one made sure to bold and italicize that the our 1st grader's scissors be "Fiskars" and only "Fiskars."  I think she owned Fiskar stock, personally.
2013-03-02 03:57:13 AM
1 votes:
The absolute most asinine thing about this is the fact that they were simply  askingfor parents to help with the supplies. If they were using the kid as a hostage for the supplies I can see getting in a furor, but  asking?
2013-03-02 03:54:29 AM
1 votes:

alfuso: School provided everything when I was a kid. All we brought to school was ourselves. Though I liked to have a pencil box and binder with paper of my own.


Schools didn't provide everything to me.  But they damn sure provided every kid in Algebra I with a copy of the textbook.
 
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