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(LA Times)   "If you were standing near the event horizon of this particular black hole, you would have to turn around because your space-time is twisting, you would be turning around once every four minutes just to stand still"   (latimes.com) divider line 53
    More: Interesting, Event Horizon, space-time, black holes, X-Rays, speed of light, XMM-Newton, particular black hole, supermassive black holes  
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2946 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Feb 2013 at 1:54 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-28 01:59:06 PM  
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2013-02-28 02:00:14 PM  
In before Black Hole Sun smile lady.
 
2013-02-28 02:02:53 PM  
Dat mass
 
2013-02-28 02:06:24 PM  
*puff*

Oh ok. I get it.
 
2013-02-28 02:08:55 PM  
How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.
 
2013-02-28 02:16:47 PM  
"Often in science when you solve one puzzle, you open the door to a deeper, more profound mystery"


// should be posted above the doorway to EVERY science classroom ever
// and stapled to certain foreheads
// this is [Geek], not [Politics], so I'm being civil
 
2013-02-28 02:18:13 PM  
you would be turning around once every four minutes just to stand still

This is the condition commonly known as the "three-drug buzz".  And I'm pretty sure a great many of us have been there.
 
2013-02-28 02:19:35 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.


Let me help answer that:

www.timecube.com
 
2013-02-28 02:25:11 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.


They're probably considering some imaginary particle orbiting just outside the event horizon and determining its velocity. I'm not sure how that really works, though, considering space-time  itself is twisted to hell and back. I imagine that paper really only talks about angular momentum and the whole "spinning near the speed of light" thing is laymen's terms because scientific journalism sucks horrible, horrible balls.
 
2013-02-28 02:27:24 PM  
What if you punched a whole in it using a photon torpedo?

/2nd worse trek, even after Abrams'.
 
2013-02-28 02:28:25 PM  
[For the record, Feb. 28, 10:40 a.m.: An earlier version of this post said NGC 1365 is about 56 million miles away. It is about 56 million light-years away.]

That's a pretty funny mistake to make. That would've put the supermassive black hole a little bit farther than Mars on it's closest path.
 
2013-02-28 02:29:59 PM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.

Let me help answer that:

[www.timecube.com image 144x144]



God guise for Queer
scam, enslaves 4 Day

cube brain  as   ONEist.

Vilify teachers - for

Queers swindle Tithe

from  1 Day Retarded
 
2013-02-28 02:33:43 PM  
I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?
 
2013-02-28 02:34:28 PM  
Yo dawg! I heard you like spaghettification, so I put some spin in your black hole so you can spin while you spaghettify while you spin!
 
2013-02-28 02:45:03 PM  
Event what now.

/There was a time when I'd talk physics to get laid and it worked.
 
2013-02-28 02:47:38 PM  

Cheese eating surrender monkey: What if you punched a whole in it using a photon torpedo?


A whole what?
 
2013-02-28 03:07:00 PM  
How many RPM is the speed of light?
 
2013-02-28 03:07:38 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.




It's a Kerr black hole, if you would like some light reading (see what I did there? Huh? Huh? Didja??)

Anyway...the interesting thing about these is that they drag spacetime around with them and provide a theoretical basis for a plausible warp drive. An object could be at "rest" in the local spacetime surrounding the black hole, while being "displaced" (though not technically moving so no violation of relativity) at a rate faster than the speed of light since it is the space itself it is resting in that is moving and there is no known limit on how fast space itself can expand or contract (thus giving the inflationary models of cosmology).
 
2013-02-28 03:12:16 PM  
the faster it goes, the behinder it gets...
 
2013-02-28 03:14:40 PM  

StrangeQ: TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.

It's a Kerr black hole, if you would like some light reading (see what I did there? Huh? Huh? Didja??)

Anyway...the interesting thing about these is that they drag spacetime around with them and provide a theoretical basis for a plausible warp drive. An object could be at "rest" in the local spacetime surrounding the black hole, while being "displaced" (though not technically moving so no violation of relativity) at a rate faster than the speed of light since it is the space itself it is resting in that is moving and there is no known limit on how fast space itself can expand or contract (thus giving the inflationary models of cosmology).


Just reading that got me stoned.
 
2013-02-28 03:15:22 PM  

StrangeQ: An object could be at "rest" in the local spacetime surrounding the black hole, while being "displaced" (though not technically moving so no violation of relativity) at a rate faster than the speed of light since it is the space itself it is resting in that is moving and there is no known limit on how fast space itself can expand or contract (thus giving the inflationary models of cosmology).


Montgomery Scott, is that you?

// did an ancient Vulcan recently visit you, with a smartass farm boy in tow?
 
2013-02-28 03:16:42 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.


Unfortunate wording; but this is an instance where I'd give the journalist a pass. A better sentence, "...spinning at 84% of the maximum possible rate..." occurs in the second paragraph. Even with scientists' input though, this isn't a distinction that I'd expect a journalist to be able to readily understand.

Long story short, if a black hole spins too fast (angular momentum becomes too great) it will theoretically no longer be a black hole. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerr_metric#Overextreme_Kerr_solutions

The condition to be met is dependent on the constant c, but you're right in that it's not really accurate to claim that it spins near the speed of light.
 
2013-02-28 03:25:37 PM  

spelletrader: Cheese eating surrender monkey: What if you punched a whole in it using a photon torpedo?

A whole what?


The whole thing, obviously, but only accidentally.

/also fark you, autocorrect.
 
2013-02-28 03:43:56 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: Event what now.

/There was a time when I'd talk physics to get laid and it worked.


so i told that bish about the chandrasekhar limit. bishes love hearing about mass stabiltiy in hydrostatic equilibrium...

/1.44 Msun
 
2013-02-28 03:53:11 PM  
And your crazy straw is actually straight.
 
2013-02-28 03:57:44 PM  

StrangeQ: TofuTheAlmighty: How does something spin near the speed of light? That makes no sense.

It's a Kerr black hole, if you would like some light reading (see what I did there? Huh? Huh? Didja??)

Anyway...the interesting thing about these is that they drag spacetime around with them and provide a theoretical basis for a plausible warp drive. An object could be at "rest" in the local spacetime surrounding the black hole, while being "displaced" (though not technically moving so no violation of relativity) at a rate faster than the speed of light since it is the space itself it is resting in that is moving and there is no known limit on how fast space itself can expand or contract (thus giving the inflationary models of cosmology).


[scannersheadexplode.gif]
 
2013-02-28 04:19:07 PM  

bullsballs: the faster it goes, the behinder it gets...


I read that as the beyonder it gets. Almost works in a secret wars 2 kind of way.
 
2013-02-28 04:24:56 PM  
Does anyone actually have a photograph of an actual black hole? All you ever see is "artist's conception". With all the smart phones and digital cameras out there, someone must have gotten a picture of one.
 
2013-02-28 04:50:48 PM  
"Well, in our country," said Alice, still panting a little, "you'd generally get to somewhere else - if you run very fast for a long time, as we've been doing."

"A slow sort of country!" said the Queen. "Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!"

www.bluesci.org
 
2013-02-28 05:08:22 PM  

Dr Dreidel: "Often in science when you solve one puzzle, you open the door to a deeper, more profound mystery"


I like Asimov's "Advances in science aren't made by 'Eureka!' moments, they're made by 'Huh. That's weird.'"
 
2013-02-28 05:13:55 PM  

elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?


Decent people shouldn't think about that too much.
 
2013-02-28 05:45:10 PM  

elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?


No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)
 
2013-02-28 06:00:43 PM  

Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)


So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?
 
2013-02-28 06:30:55 PM  

elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?


Pretty sure that in that case you're soon going to have one "big" black hole instead of two smaller ones. If I'm not mistaken black holes are expected to be able to gobble one another up. (bigger and smaller of course I mean in terms of mass)

Think of a black hole like a star that is really, really teeny (which is kinda what they are) instead of an actual hole or void. We call them black "holes", but they're really an enormous amount of mass which has collapsed into a tiny point due to the massive gravity overwhelming the forces which normally keep most matter from doing so.

If one wanders into the event horizon of another they're going to merge in to a black hole with the mass of both of them.


Pick: Does anyone actually have a photograph of an actual black hole? All you ever see is "artist's conception". With all the smart phones and digital cameras out there, someone must have gotten a picture of one.



On the off chance you're not just being facetious (and if you are I'd tell you that there are plenty pictures of Lindsay Lohan out there) - which I'm thinking you might be because of the notion of "smart phones" taking a picture of distant astronomical objects - I'll answer that.

You can't take a picture of the object we call a black hole. Not the black hole itself, anyway. By definition a black hole is a mass so large that nothing can ever escape the pull of its gravity once it gets too close (that point of no return where the gravity it too hard for anything to escape from is what we're referring to when we say the "event horizon"). So the light which would need to reflect off of the black hole and end up on the imaging sensor of a camera cannot escape the black hole's gravity and simply falls in to the black hole instead, increasing its mass by that much.

The only thing you could take a picture of would be the accretion disc around the black hole. That's the disc of matter which is swirling in as it falls in to the black hole. You can take images of that until it reaches the event horizon. Here's a link to the Hubble doing just that.
 
2013-02-28 06:45:30 PM  
I'm guessing you'd suffocate first.
 
2013-02-28 06:57:29 PM  

mongbiohazard: elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?

Pretty sure that in that case you're soon going to have one "big" black hole instead of two smaller ones. If I'm not mistaken black holes are expected to be able to gobble one another up. (bigger and smaller of course I mean in terms of mass)

Think of a black hole like a star that is really, really teeny (which is kinda what they are) instead of an actual hole or void. We call them black "holes", but they're really an enormous amount of mass which has collapsed into a tiny point due to the massive gravity overwhelming the forces which normally keep most matter from doing so.

If one wanders into the event horizon of another they're going to merge in to a black hole with the mass of both of them.


Pick: Does anyone actually have a photograph of an actual black hole? All you ever see is "artist's conception". With all the smart phones and digital cameras out there, someone must have gotten a picture of one.


On the off chance you're not just being facetious (and if you are I'd tell you that there are plenty pictures of Lindsay Lohan out there) - which I'm thinking you might be because of the notion of "smart phones" taking a picture of distant astronomical objects - I'll answer that.

You can't take a picture of the object we call a black hole. Not the black hole itself, a ...


I think this is where I'm confused... Does gravity coming from opposite vectors cancel?  ie, does an object on one body feel less "total" gravitational pull if it is between two sufficiently large objects?
 
2013-02-28 07:13:18 PM  

elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?


They probably wouldn't overlap for long as the two black holes would likely be spiraling towards each other at relativistic speeds.  Other than that, nothing more than what happens in a normal event horizon...which is essentially nothing more than what happens outside an event horizon except they are a region from which nothing can ever escape.  In reality, if a black hole was big enough, it could have a large enough event horizon that you could pass into it and survive unscathed as you wouldn't be close enough to be subjected to such extreme gravity gradients that you run into the spagettification scenario.  Of course, you would never be able to tell anyone about your trip, unless they came through with you, which is another likely scenario if we are in fact living within a closed universe.  If there is enough mass in the universe to eventually cause it to slow and fall back in on itself, it would be as if we are living within a black hole with an event horizon the size of the known universe.
 
2013-02-28 07:25:53 PM  

elchupacabra: I think this is where I'm confused... Does gravity coming from opposite vectors cancel? ie, does an object on one body feel less "total" gravitational pull if it is between two sufficiently large objects?




Oh, indeed it does, at what are known as Lagrangian Points.

And now that you ask, it does make me wonder if you were to move in a direction perpendicular to the plane containing the two black holes if you might be able to escape since if you were able to keep a perfect trajectory, the forces towards each black hole would remain canceled and you would be subject only to a restoring forcing pulling you back to the lagrange point proportional to twice the sine of the angle created by a line from you to the black hole relative to the plane. It could be possible that it would be enough to reduce the gravitational force on you to less than what is necessary to create an event horizon and allow you to escape.
 
2013-02-28 08:21:04 PM  

StrangeQ: elchupacabra: I think this is where I'm confused... Does gravity coming from opposite vectors cancel? ie, does an object on one body feel less "total" gravitational pull if it is between two sufficiently large objects?

Oh, indeed it does, at what are known as Lagrangian Points.

And now that you ask, it does make me wonder if you were to move in a direction perpendicular to the plane containing the two black holes if you might be able to escape since if you were able to keep a perfect trajectory, the forces towards each black hole would remain canceled and you would be subject only to a restoring forcing pulling you back to the lagrange point proportional to twice the sine of the angle created by a line from you to the black hole relative to the plane. It could be possible that it would be enough to reduce the gravitational force on you to less than what is necessary to create an event horizon and allow you to escape.



I wonder... I'm thinking you'd never be able to escape that Lagrane point. In that place the opposing forces would cancel out, but outside of it they wouldn't. Though the forces involved are so great the margin of error would also be vanishingly small. Also, with two black holes so close they're going to be pulling towards each other, so that lagrange point being at that place is going to be extremely fleeting.
 
2013-02-28 08:55:23 PM  
www.wearysloth.com

Approves.
 
2013-02-28 09:04:52 PM  

Pick: Does anyone actually have a photograph of an actual black hole? All you ever see is "artist's conception". With all the smart phones and digital cameras out there, someone must have gotten a picture of one.


Dear Pick:

I shall try to stick to words of one syllable or less, since you consistently seem to have a five year old kid's, um, thinking level.

Black holes are in the sky, way way far off.

You can not take a picture of a black hole with your smrt phone.
 
2013-02-28 09:24:02 PM  
mongbiohazard:
I wonder... I'm thinking you'd never be able to escape that Lagrane point. In that place the opposing forces would cancel out, but outside of it they wouldn't. Though the forces involved are so great the margin of error would also be vanishingly small. Also, with two black holes so close they're going to be pulling towards each other, so that lagrange point being at that place is going to be extremely fleeting.

Of course...in reality those black holes would be anything but stationary and would in fact be spiraling in towards each other.  That alone would produce theoretical gravitational waves that might preclude such a thing from even being attempted.  But in the simplified case...the restoring force back to the lagrangian point would be much less than the force exerted at that same distance by a black hole alone.  You would have to calculate the Schwarzschild radius for the combined black hole system.  If you looked at it from far enough away, the distance between the two black holes would become negligible and you could treat the entire system as a black hole with mass 2M...but close in you would have near field effects similar to what you get with a dipole.  It almost seems like the radii might get pinched in as you approach the lagrangian points as more of the opposing black holes' gravitational fields cancel each other out, but honestly I have no idea...astrophysics was really where I hit my ceiling.
 
2013-02-28 10:34:07 PM  

elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?


No.
 
2013-02-28 10:42:41 PM  

elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?


Nothing, really. The thing is, there is nothing there to interact with. The Event Horizon is the point at which space has curved back in on itself, but nothing really is there.

As long as the actual black hole does not cross the event horizon, the two would just pass by as dictated by gravity. HOWEVER, the 'weirdness' of frame dragging and other relativistic effects would make for some odd behavior. Its just that the event horizons themselves would not really do anything.
 
2013-02-28 10:59:44 PM  

mongbiohazard: StrangeQ: elchupacabra: I think this is where I'm confused... Does gravity coming from opposite vectors cancel? ie, does an object on one body feel less "total" gravitational pull if it is between two sufficiently large objects?

Oh, indeed it does, at what are known as Lagrangian Points.

And now that you ask, it does make me wonder if you were to move in a direction perpendicular to the plane containing the two black holes if you might be able to escape since if you were able to keep a perfect trajectory, the forces towards each black hole would remain canceled and you would be subject only to a restoring forcing pulling you back to the lagrange point proportional to twice the sine of the angle created by a line from you to the black hole relative to the plane. It could be possible that it would be enough to reduce the gravitational force on you to less than what is necessary to create an event horizon and allow you to escape.


I wonder... I'm thinking you'd never be able to escape that Lagrane point. In that place the opposing forces would cancel out, but outside of it they wouldn't. Though the forces involved are so great the margin of error would also be vanishingly small. Also, with two black holes so close they're going to be pulling towards each other, so that lagrange point being at that place is going to be extremely fleeting.


I'm thinking the same, since the existence of the event horizon is the figurative example of a real life divide by zero (maybe literal too from a gravitational perspective). You would probable end up with a Lagrange point of zero volume and infinite force anywhere outside of that point. (And you know how small an area the inside of a point is)

So a mathematicaly stable point, but that's about it. (Vs the Earth Moon points in which there is a 'useful' volume due to the fact that gravity there is so weak you have wiggle room.
 
2013-03-01 02:42:28 AM  

mongbiohazard: elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?

Pretty sure that in that case you're soon going to have one "big" black hole instead of two smaller ones. If I'm not mistaken black holes are expected to be able to gobble one another up. (bigger and smaller of course I mean in terms of mass)

Think of a black hole like a star that is really, really teeny (which is kinda what they are) instead of an actual hole or void. We call them black "holes", but they're really an enormous amount of mass which has collapsed into a tiny point due to the massive gravity overwhelming the forces which normally keep most matter from doing so.

If one wanders into the event horizon of another they're going to merge in to a black hole with the mass of both of them.


Pick: Does anyone actually have a photograph of an actual black hole? All you ever see is "artist's conception". With all the smart phones and digital cameras out there, someone must have gotten a picture of one.


On the off chance you're not just being facetious (and if you are I'd tell you that there are plenty pictures of Lindsay Lohan out there) - which I'm thinking you might be because of the notion of "smart phones" taking a picture of distant astronomical objects - I'll answer that.

You can't take a picture of the object we call a black hole. Not the black hole itself, a ...


This would also cause a MASSIVE Gamma-ray burst that would probably cook any life that might be present within 50K light years of the event.
 
2013-03-01 05:39:30 AM  

elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?


A lagrange point inbetween in the short time before they fall into each other.
 
2013-03-01 08:34:34 AM  

dready zim: elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?

A lagrange point inbetween in the short time before they fall into each other.


A how how how short of a time?
 
2013-03-01 10:49:13 AM  

Smoking GNU: mongbiohazard: elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?

Pretty sure that in that case you're soon going to have one "big" black hole instead of two smaller ones. If I'm not mistaken black holes are expected to be able to gobble one another up. (bigger and smaller of course I mean in terms of mass)

Think of a black hole like a star that is really, really teeny (which is kinda what they are) instead of an actual hole or void. We call them black "holes", but they're really an enormous amount of mass which has collapsed into a tiny point due to the massive gravity overwhelming the forces which normally keep most matter from doing so.

If one wanders into the event horizon of another they're going to merge in to a black hole with the mass of both of them.


Pick: Does anyone actually have a photograph of an actual black hole? All you ever see is "artist's conception". With all the smart phones and digital cameras out there, someone must have gotten a picture of one.


On the off chance you're not just being facetious (and if you are I'd tell you that there are plenty pictures of Lindsay Lohan out there) - which I'm thinking you might be because of the notion of "smart phones" taking a picture of distant astronomical objects - I'll answer that.

You can't take a picture of the object we call a black hole. Not the black hole itself, a ...

This would also cause a MASSIVE Gamma-ray burst that would probably cook any life that might be present within 50K light years of the event.


Not likely, the accretion disks if not many solar masses would be ejected or absorbed. Magnetic fields would shunt the energy into streams at the poles. But the actual black holes wouldn't make a peep in the the EM spectrum.

Gravitational waves though? Those would be big.
 
2013-03-01 10:53:23 AM  

croesius: dready zim: elchupacabra: Ambitwistor: elchupacabra: I always wondered what would happen to the event horizon of two black holes travelling in near-parallel vectors...  would that ever cause the possibility that mass that at one point was inside the event horizon of one black hole, is pushed or pulled out of that event horizon?

No, by definition.  If it can escape a horizon, it was never behind one to begin with, because a horizon is by definition a region that nothing can ever escape.  (Mathematically, this means you kind of need to know the entire future history of the universe in order to define whether a horizon is present.)

So... If two Event horizons overlap, or come extremely close... What happens?

A lagrange point inbetween in the short time before they fall into each other.

A how how how short of a time?


Depends. What was their relative velocity before meeting? Could be zero seconds if they were head on, never if they 'missed' by only a few inches(slingshot), millions of years if they end up orbiting each other.
 
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